ncurses 6.0 - patch 20180106
[ncurses.git] / doc / html / man / scr_dump.5.html
index dafb1c0e38cabdc5921157e89214be233ba44e03..081c90edd48e504fd3a4576b5c19f2498326d5eb 100644 (file)
   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
   * authorization.                                                           *
   ****************************************************************************
   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
   * authorization.                                                           *
   ****************************************************************************
-  * @Id: scr_dump.5,v 1.9 2017/04/22 18:44:25 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: scr_dump.5,v 1.12 2017/11/25 20:12:55 tom Exp @
 -->
 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
 <HTML>
 <HEAD>
 <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
 -->
 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
 <HTML>
 <HEAD>
 <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
-<meta name="generator" content="Manpage converted by man2html - see http://invisible-island.net/scripts/readme.html#others_scripts">
+<meta name="generator" content="Manpage converted by man2html - see https://invisible-island.net/scripts/readme.html#others_scripts">
 <TITLE>scr_dump 5</TITLE>
 <link rev=made href="mailto:bug-ncurses@gnu.org">
 <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
 <TITLE>scr_dump 5</TITLE>
 <link rev=made href="mailto:bug-ncurses@gnu.org">
 <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@
 <BODY>
 <H1 class="no-header">scr_dump 5</H1>
 <PRE>
 <BODY>
 <H1 class="no-header">scr_dump 5</H1>
 <PRE>
-<STRONG><A HREF="scr_dump.5.html">scr_dump(5)</A></STRONG>                                                 <STRONG><A HREF="scr_dump.5.html">scr_dump(5)</A></STRONG>
+<STRONG><A HREF="scr_dump.5.html">scr_dump(5)</A></STRONG>                   File Formats Manual                  <STRONG><A HREF="scr_dump.5.html">scr_dump(5)</A></STRONG>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-DESCRIPTION">DESCRIPTION</a></H2><PRE>
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-DESCRIPTION">DESCRIPTION</a></H2><PRE>
-       The  curses library provides applications with the ability
-       to write the contents of a  window  to  an  external  file
-       using   <STRONG>scr_dump</STRONG>   or  <STRONG>putwin</STRONG>,  and  read  it  back  using
-       <STRONG>scr_restore</STRONG> or <STRONG>getwin</STRONG>.
+       The  curses library provides applications with the ability to write the
+       contents of a window to an external file using <STRONG>scr_dump</STRONG> or <STRONG>putwin</STRONG>,  and
+       read it back using <STRONG>scr_restore</STRONG> or <STRONG>getwin</STRONG>.
 
 
-       The  <STRONG>putwin</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>getwin</STRONG>  functions  do  the  work;  while
-       <STRONG>scr_dump</STRONG> and <STRONG>scr_restore</STRONG> conveniently save and restore the
-       whole screen, i.e., <STRONG>stdscr</STRONG>.
+       The  <STRONG>putwin</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>getwin</STRONG>  functions  do  the  work;  while <STRONG>scr_dump</STRONG> and
+       <STRONG>scr_restore</STRONG> conveniently save and restore the whole screen, i.e.,  <STRONG>std-</STRONG>
+       <STRONG>scr</STRONG>.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-ncurses6">ncurses6</a></H3><PRE>
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-ncurses6">ncurses6</a></H3><PRE>
-       A longstanding implementation of screen-dump  was  revised
-       with   ncurses6   to  remedy  problems  with  the  earlier
-       approach:
+       A  longstanding implementation of screen-dump was revised with ncurses6
+       to remedy problems with the earlier approach:
 
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   A "magic number" is written to the  beginning  of  the
-           dump  file, allowing applications (such as <STRONG>file(1)</STRONG>) to
-           recognize curses dump files.
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   A "magic number" is written to the  beginning  of  the  dump  file,
+           allowing  applications  (such  as <STRONG>file(1)</STRONG>) to recognize curses dump
+           files.
 
 
-           Because ncurses6 uses a new format,  that  requires  a
-           new  magic  number  was  unused by other applications.
-           This 16-bit number was unused:
+           Because ncurses6 uses a new format, that requires a new magic  num-
+           ber  was  unused  by  other  applications.   This 16-bit number was
+           unused:
 
 
-             0x8888 (octal "\210\210")
+               0x8888 (octal "\210\210")
 
            but to be more certain, this 32-bit number was chosen:
 
 
            but to be more certain, this 32-bit number was chosen:
 
-             0x88888888 (octal "\210\210\210\210")
+               0x88888888 (octal "\210\210\210\210")
 
 
-           This is the pattern submitted to  the  maintainers  of
-           the <STRONG>file</STRONG> program:
+           This is the pattern submitted to the maintainers of the  <STRONG>file</STRONG>  pro-
+           gram:
 
 
-             #
-             # ncurses5 (and before) did not use a magic number,
-             # making screen dumps "data".
-             #
-             # ncurses6 (2015) uses this format, ignoring byte-order
-             0    string    \210\210\210\210ncurses    ncurses6 screen image
-             #
+               #
+               # ncurses5 (and before) did not use a magic number,
+               # making screen dumps "data".
+               #
+               # ncurses6 (2015) uses this format, ignoring byte-order
+               0    string    \210\210\210\210ncurses    ncurses6 screen image
+               #
 
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The  screen dumps are written in textual form, so that
-           internal data sizes are not directly  related  to  the
-           dump-format,  and  enabling  the library to read dumps
-           from either narrow- or wide-character- configurations.
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The screen dumps are written in textual form, so that internal data
+           sizes are not directly related to the dump-format, and enabling the
+           library  to  read dumps from either narrow- or wide-character- con-
+           figurations.
 
 
-           The <EM>narrow</EM> library configuration holds characters  and
-           video  attributes  in a 32-bit <STRONG>chtype</STRONG>, while the <EM>wide-</EM>
-           <EM>character</EM>  library  stores  this  information  in  the
-           <STRONG>cchar_t</STRONG> structure, which is much larger than 32-bits.
+           The  <EM>narrow</EM>  library  configuration  holds  characters  and   video
+           attributes  in  a  32-bit  <STRONG>chtype</STRONG>, while the <EM>wide-character</EM> library
+           stores this information in the <STRONG>cchar_t</STRONG>  structure,  which  is  much
+           larger than 32-bits.
 
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   It  is  possible to read a screen dump into a terminal
-           with a  different  screen-size,  because  the  library
-           truncates or fills the screen as necessary.
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   It is possible to read a screen dump into a terminal with a differ-
+           ent screen-size, because the library truncates or fills the  screen
+           as necessary.
 
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The ncurses6 <STRONG>getwin</STRONG> reads the legacy screen dumps from
-           ncurses5.
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The ncurses6 <STRONG>getwin</STRONG> reads the legacy screen dumps from ncurses5.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-ncurses5-_legacy_">ncurses5 (legacy)</a></H3><PRE>
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-ncurses5-_legacy_">ncurses5 (legacy)</a></H3><PRE>
-       The screen-dump feature was added to ncurses in June 1995.
-       While  there  were  fixes  and  improvements in succeeding
-       years, the basic scheme was unchanged:
+       The screen-dump feature was added to ncurses in June 1995.  While there
+       were fixes and improvements in succeeding years, the basic  scheme  was
+       unchanged:
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG> structure was written in binary form.
 
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG> structure was written in binary form.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG> structure refers to lines  of  data,  which
-           were  written as an array of binary data following the
-           <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG>.
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG> structure refers to lines of data, which were written as
+           an array of binary data following the <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG>.
 
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   When <STRONG>getwin</STRONG> restored the window, it would  keep  track
-           of  offsets into the array of line-data and adjust the
-           <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG> structure which was read back into memory.
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   When <STRONG>getwin</STRONG> restored the window, it would  keep  track  of  offsets
+           into  the  array of line-data and adjust the <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG> structure which
+           was read back into memory.
 
 
-       This is similar to Unix SystemV,  but  does  not  write  a
-       "magic number" to identify the file format.
+       This is similar to Unix SystemV, but does not write a "magic number" to
+       identify the file format.
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-PORTABILITY">PORTABILITY</a></H2><PRE>
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-PORTABILITY">PORTABILITY</a></H2><PRE>
-       There  is  no  standard  format  for <STRONG>putwin</STRONG>.  This section
-       gives a brief description of the existing formats.
+       There  is  no  standard  format for <STRONG>putwin</STRONG>.  This section gives a brief
+       description of the existing formats.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-X_Open-Curses">X/Open Curses</a></H3><PRE>
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-X_Open-Curses">X/Open Curses</a></H3><PRE>
 
        X/Open's documentation for <EM>enhanced</EM> <EM>curses</EM> says only:
 
 
        X/Open's documentation for <EM>enhanced</EM> <EM>curses</EM> says only:
 
-          The <EM>getwin(</EM> <EM>)</EM> function reads window-related data stored
-          in  the  file  by <EM>putwin(</EM> <EM>)</EM>.  The function then creates
-          and initializes a new window using that data.
+          The <EM>getwin(</EM> <EM>)</EM> function reads window-related data stored in the  file
+          by  <EM>putwin(</EM> <EM>)</EM>.  The function then creates and initializes a new win-
+          dow using that data.
 
 
-          The <EM>putwin(</EM> <EM>)</EM> function writes all data associated  with
-          <EM>win</EM>  into the <EM>stdio</EM> stream to which <EM>filep</EM> points, using
-          an  <STRONG>unspecified</STRONG>  <STRONG>format</STRONG>.   This  information   can   be
-          retrieved later using <EM>getwin(</EM> <EM>)</EM>.
+          The <EM>putwin(</EM> <EM>)</EM> function writes all data associated with <EM>win</EM> into  the
+          <EM>stdio</EM>  stream  to  which  <EM>filep</EM> points, using an <STRONG>unspecified</STRONG> <STRONG>format</STRONG>.
+          This information can be retrieved later using <EM>getwin(</EM> <EM>)</EM>.
 
 
-       In the mid-1990s when the X/Open Curses document was writ-
-       ten, there were still systems using  older,  less  capable
-       curses  libraries (aside from the BSD curses library which
-       was not relevant to X/Open because it  did  not  meet  the
-       criteria  for  <EM>base</EM>  <EM>curses</EM>).   The document explained the
+       In the mid-1990s when the X/Open Curses  document  was  written,  there
+       were  still  systems  using older, less capable curses libraries (aside
+       from the BSD curses library which was not relevant to X/Open because it
+       did not meet the criteria for <EM>base</EM> <EM>curses</EM>).  The document explained the
        term "enhanced" as follows:
 
        term "enhanced" as follows:
 
-          <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Shading is used to identify <EM>X/Open</EM> <EM>Enhanced</EM>  <EM>Curses</EM>
-              material,  relating  to interfaces included to pro-
-              vide enhanced capabilities for applications  origi-
-              nally  written  to  be compiled on systems based on
-              the UNIX operating system. Therefore, the  features
-              described  may  not be present on systems that con-
-              form to <STRONG>XPG4</STRONG> <STRONG>or</STRONG> <STRONG>to</STRONG> <STRONG>earlier</STRONG> <STRONG>XPG</STRONG> <STRONG>releases</STRONG>.  The rele-
-              vant reference pages may provide additional or more
-              specific portability  warnings  about  use  of  the
-              material.
+          <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Shading is used to identify  <EM>X/Open</EM>  <EM>Enhanced</EM>  <EM>Curses</EM>  material,
+              relating to interfaces included to provide enhanced capabilities
+              for applications originally written to be  compiled  on  systems
+              based  on  the  UNIX  operating  system. Therefore, the features
+              described may not be present on systems that conform to <STRONG>XPG4</STRONG>  <STRONG>or</STRONG>
+              <STRONG>to</STRONG>  <STRONG>earlier</STRONG> <STRONG>XPG</STRONG> <STRONG>releases</STRONG>.  The relevant reference pages may pro-
+              vide additional or more specific portability warnings about  use
+              of the material.
 
 
-       In the foregoing, emphasis was added to <STRONG>unspecified</STRONG> <STRONG>format</STRONG>
-       and to <STRONG>XPG4</STRONG> <STRONG>or</STRONG> <STRONG>to</STRONG> <STRONG>earlier</STRONG> <STRONG>XPG</STRONG> <STRONG>releases</STRONG>, for clarity.
+       In  the foregoing, emphasis was added to <STRONG>unspecified</STRONG> <STRONG>format</STRONG> and to <STRONG>XPG4</STRONG>
+       <STRONG>or</STRONG> <STRONG>to</STRONG> <STRONG>earlier</STRONG> <STRONG>XPG</STRONG> <STRONG>releases</STRONG>, for clarity.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Unix-SystemV">Unix SystemV</a></H3><PRE>
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Unix-SystemV">Unix SystemV</a></H3><PRE>
-       Unix SystemV curses identified the file format by  writing
-       a "magic number" at the beginning of the dump.  The <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG>
-       data and the lines of text follow, all in binary form.
+       Unix SystemV curses identified the file format by writing a "magic num-
+       ber"  at  the  beginning of the dump.  The <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG> data and the lines of
+       text follow, all in binary form.
 
        The Solaris curses source has these definitions:
 
 
        The Solaris curses source has these definitions:
 
-         /* terminfo magic number */
-         #define MAGNUM  0432
+           /* terminfo magic number */
+           #define MAGNUM  0432
 
 
-         /* curses screen dump magic number */
-         #define SVR2_DUMP_MAGIC_NUMBER  0433
-         #define SVR3_DUMP_MAGIC_NUMBER  0434
+           /* curses screen dump magic number */
+           #define SVR2_DUMP_MAGIC_NUMBER  0433
+           #define SVR3_DUMP_MAGIC_NUMBER  0434
 
 
-       That is, the feature was likely introduced in SVr2 (1984),
-       and  improved  in  SVr3 (1987).  The Solaris curses source
-       has no magic number for SVr4 (1989).  Other operating sys-
-       tems  (AIX and HPUX) use a magic number which would corre-
-       spond to this definition:
+       That is, the feature was likely introduced in SVr2 (1984), and improved
+       in SVr3 (1987).  The Solaris curses source has no magic number for SVr4
+       (1989).  Other operating systems (AIX and  HPUX)  use  a  magic  number
+       which would correspond to this definition:
 
 
-         /* curses screen dump magic number */
-         #define SVR4_DUMP_MAGIC_NUMBER  0435
+           /* curses screen dump magic number */
+           #define SVR4_DUMP_MAGIC_NUMBER  0435
 
 
-       That octal number in bytes is 001, 035.  Because most Unix
-       vendors use big-endian hardware, the magic number is writ-
-       ten with the high-order byte first, e.g.,
+       That  octal number in bytes is 001, 035.  Because most Unix vendors use
+       big-endian hardware, the magic number is written  with  the  high-order
+       byte first, e.g.,
 
 
-          01 35
+            01 35
 
 
-       After the magic number, the <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG> structure and line-data
-       are written in binary format.  While the magic number used
-       by the Unix systems can be seen using <STRONG>od(1)</STRONG>, none  of  the
-       Unix systems documents the format used for screen-dumps.
+       After  the magic number, the <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG> structure and line-data are written
+       in binary format.  While the magic number used by the Unix systems  can
+       be seen using <STRONG>od(1)</STRONG>, none of the Unix systems documents the format used
+       for screen-dumps.
 
 
-       The Unix systems do not use identical formats.  While col-
-       lecting information for for this manual  page,  the  <EM>save-</EM>
-       <EM>screen</EM>  test-program produced dumps of different size (all
-       on 64-bit hardware, on 40x80 screens):
+       The Unix systems do not use identical formats.  While collecting infor-
+       mation  for  for this manual page, the <EM>savescreen</EM> test-program produced
+       dumps of different size (all on 64-bit hardware, on 40x80 screens):
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   AIX (51817 bytes)
 
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   AIX (51817 bytes)
 
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Solaris">Solaris</a></H3><PRE>
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Solaris">Solaris</a></H3><PRE>
-       As noted above, Solaris curses has no magic number  corre-
-       sponding  to  SVr4  curses.  This is odd since Solaris was
-       the first operating system to pass  the  SVr4  guidelines.
-       Solaris has two versions of curses:
+       As noted above, Solaris curses has no  magic  number  corresponding  to
+       SVr4  curses.  This is odd since Solaris was the first operating system
+       to pass the SVr4 guidelines.  Solaris has two versions of curses:
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The default curses library uses the SVr3 magic number.
 
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The default curses library uses the SVr3 magic number.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   There  is  an  alternate  curses library in <STRONG>/usr/xpg4</STRONG>.
-           This uses a textual format with no magic number.
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   There is an alternate curses library in  <STRONG>/usr/xpg4</STRONG>.   This  uses  a
+           textual format with no magic number.
 
 
-           According to the copyright notice,  the  <EM>xpg4</EM>  Solaris
-           curses library was developed by MKS (Mortice Kern Sys-
-           tems) from 1990 to 1995.
+           According  to the copyright notice, the <EM>xpg4</EM> Solaris curses library
+           was developed by MKS (Mortice Kern Systems) from 1990 to 1995.
 
 
-           Like ncurses6, there is a file-header with parameters.
-           Unlike  ncurses6, the contents of the window are writ-
-           ten piecemeal, with  coordinates  and  attributes  for
-           each  chunk of text rather than writing the whole win-
-           dow from top to bottom.
+           Like ncurses6, there is  a  file-header  with  parameters.   Unlike
+           ncurses6,  the  contents  of the window are written piecemeal, with
+           coordinates and attributes for each chunk of text rather than writ-
+           ing the whole window from top to bottom.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-PDCurses">PDCurses</a></H3><PRE>
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-PDCurses">PDCurses</a></H3><PRE>
-       PDCurses added support for screen  dumps  in  version  2.7
-       (2005).   Like  Unix  SystemV  and ncurses5, it writes the
-       <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG> structure in binary, but begins the file  with  its
-       three-byte  identifier  "PDC", followed by a one-byte ver-
-       sion, e.g.,
+       PDCurses  added  support  for screen dumps in version 2.7 (2005).  Like
+       Unix SystemV and ncurses5, it writes the <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG>  structure  in  binary,
+       but begins the file with its three-byte identifier "PDC", followed by a
+       one-byte version, e.g.,
 
 
-              "PDC\001"
+                "PDC\001"
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-NetBSD">NetBSD</a></H3><PRE>
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-NetBSD">NetBSD</a></H3><PRE>
-       As of April 2017,  NetBSD  curses  does  not  yet  support
-       screen dumps.
+       As  of  April  2017,  NetBSD  curses  does  not  support  <STRONG>scr_dump</STRONG>  and
+       <STRONG>scr_restore</STRONG> (or <STRONG>scr_init</STRONG>, <STRONG>scr_set</STRONG>), although it has <STRONG>putwin</STRONG> and <STRONG>getwin</STRONG>.
+
+       Like  ncurses5, NetBSD <STRONG>putwin</STRONG> does not identify its dumps with a useful
+       magic number.  It writes
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   the curses shared library major and minor versions as the first two
+           bytes (e.g., 7 and 1),
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   followed by a binary dump of the <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG>,
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   some  data  for wide-characters referenced by the <STRONG>WINDOW</STRONG> structure,
+           and
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   finally, lines as done by other implementations.
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-EXAMPLE">EXAMPLE</a></H2><PRE>
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-EXAMPLE">EXAMPLE</a></H2><PRE>
-       Given  a  simple  program  which writes text to the screen
-       (and for the sake of example, limiting the screen-size  to
-       10x20):
-
-         #include &lt;curses.h&gt;
-
-         int
-         main(void)
-         {
-             putenv("LINES=10");
-             putenv("COLUMNS=20");
-             initscr();
-             start_color();
-             init_pair(1, COLOR_WHITE, COLOR_BLUE);
-             init_pair(2, COLOR_RED, COLOR_BLACK);
-             bkgd(<STRONG>COLOR_PAIR(1)</STRONG>);
-             move(4, 5);
-             attron(A_BOLD);
-             addstr("Hello");
-             move(5, 5);
-             attroff(A_BOLD);
-             attrset(A_REVERSE | <STRONG>COLOR_PAIR(2)</STRONG>);
-             addstr("World!");
-             refresh();
-             scr_dump("foo.out");
-             endwin();
-             return 0;
-         }
+       Given a simple program which writes text to the  screen  (and  for  the
+       sake of example, limiting the screen-size to 10x20):
+
+           #include &lt;curses.h&gt;
+
+           int
+           main(void)
+           {
+               putenv("LINES=10");
+               putenv("COLUMNS=20");
+               initscr();
+               start_color();
+               init_pair(1, COLOR_WHITE, COLOR_BLUE);
+               init_pair(2, COLOR_RED, COLOR_BLACK);
+               bkgd(<STRONG>COLOR_PAIR(1)</STRONG>);
+               move(4, 5);
+               attron(A_BOLD);
+               addstr("Hello");
+               move(5, 5);
+               attroff(A_BOLD);
+               attrset(A_REVERSE | <STRONG>COLOR_PAIR(2)</STRONG>);
+               addstr("World!");
+               refresh();
+               scr_dump("foo.out");
+               endwin();
+               return 0;
+           }
 
        When run using ncurses6, the output looks like this:
 
 
        When run using ncurses6, the output looks like this:
 
-         \210\210\210\210ncurses 6.0.20170415
-         _cury=5
-         _curx=11
-         _maxy=9
-         _maxx=19
-         _flags=14
-         _attrs=\{REVERSE|C2}
-         flag=_idcok
-         _delay=-1
-         _regbottom=9
-         _bkgrnd=\{NORMAL|C1}\s
-         rows:
-         1:\{NORMAL|C1}\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
-         2:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
-         3:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
-         4:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
-         5:\s\s\s\s\s\{BOLD}Hello\{NORMAL}\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
-         6:\s\s\s\s\s\{REVERSE|C2}World!\{NORMAL|C1}\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
-         7:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
-         8:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
-         9:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
-         10:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
-
-       The  first  four  octal  escapes  are actually nonprinting
-       characters, while the remainder of the file  is  printable
-       text.  You may notice:
-
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The  actual  color  pair values are not written to the
-           file.
-
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   All characters are shown in printable form; spaces are
-           "\s" to ensure they are not overlooked.
-
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Attributes  are written in escaped curly braces, e.g.,
-           "\{BOLD}", and may include a color-pair (C1 or  C2  in
-           this example).
-
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The  parameters  in the header are written out only if
-           they are nonzero.  When reading back, order  does  not
-           matter.
-
-       Running  the  same  program with Solaris <EM>xpg4</EM> curses gives
-       this dump:
-
-         MAX=10,20
-         BEG=0,0
-         SCROLL=0,10
-         VMIN=1
-         VTIME=0
-         FLAGS=0x1000
-         FG=0,0
-         BG=0,0,
-         0,0,0,1,
-         0,19,0,0,
-         1,0,0,1,
-         1,19,0,0,
-         2,0,0,1,
-         2,19,0,0,
-         3,0,0,1,
-         3,19,0,0,
-         4,0,0,1,
-         4,5,0x20,0,Hello
-         4,10,0,1,
-         4,19,0,0,
-         5,0,0,1,
-         5,5,0x4,2,World!
-         5,11,0,1,
-         5,19,0,0,
-         6,0,0,1,
-         6,19,0,0,
-         7,0,0,1,
-         7,19,0,0,
-         8,0,0,1,
-         8,19,0,0,
-         9,0,0,1,
-         9,19,0,0,
-         CUR=11,5
-
-       Solaris <STRONG>getwin</STRONG> requires that all parameters  are  present,
-       and  in  the same order.  The <EM>xpg4</EM> curses library does not
-       know about the <STRONG>bce</STRONG> (back color erase) capability, and does
-       not color the window background.
-
-       On the other hand, the SVr4 curses library does know about
-       the background color.  However, its screen  dumps  are  in
-       binary.   Here  is  the  corresponding  dump (using "od -t
-       x1"):
-
-         0000000 1c 01 c3 d6 f3 58 05 00 0b 00 0a 00 14 00 00 00
-         0000020 00 00 02 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
-         0000040 00 00 b8 1a 06 08 cc 1a 06 08 00 00 09 00 10 00
-         0000060 00 00 00 80 00 00 20 00 00 00 ff ff ff ff 00 00
-         0000100 ff ff ff ff 00 00 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00
-         0000120 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00
-         *
-         0000620 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 48 80 00 04
-         0000640 65 80 00 04 6c 80 00 04 6c 80 00 04 6f 80 00 04
-         0000660 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00
-         *
-         0000740 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 57 00 81 00
-         0000760 6f 00 81 00 72 00 81 00 6c 00 81 00 64 00 81 00
-         0001000 21 00 81 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00
-         0001020 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00
-         *
-         0001540 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 00 00 f6 d1 01 00 f6 d1
-         0001560 08 00 00 00 40 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 07
-         0001600 00 04 00 01 00 01 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 00 00 00
-         0001620 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
-         *
-         0002371
+           \210\210\210\210ncurses 6.0.20170415
+           _cury=5
+           _curx=11
+           _maxy=9
+           _maxx=19
+           _flags=14
+           _attrs=\{REVERSE|C2}
+           flag=_idcok
+           _delay=-1
+           _regbottom=9
+           _bkgrnd=\{NORMAL|C1}\s
+           rows:
+           1:\{NORMAL|C1}\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
+           2:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
+           3:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
+           4:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
+           5:\s\s\s\s\s\{BOLD}Hello\{NORMAL}\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
+           6:\s\s\s\s\s\{REVERSE|C2}World!\{NORMAL|C1}\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
+           7:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
+           8:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
+           9:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
+           10:\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s\s
+
+       The first four octal escapes are actually nonprinting characters, while
+       the remainder of the file is printable text.  You may notice:
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The actual color pair values are not written to the file.
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   All characters are shown in printable  form;  spaces  are  "\s"  to
+           ensure they are not overlooked.
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Attributes  are  written  in escaped curly braces, e.g., "\{BOLD}",
+           and may include a color-pair (C1 or C2 in this example).
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The parameters in the header are  written  out  only  if  they  are
+           nonzero.  When reading back, order does not matter.
+
+       Running the same program with Solaris <EM>xpg4</EM> curses gives this dump:
+
+           MAX=10,20
+           BEG=0,0
+           SCROLL=0,10
+           VMIN=1
+           VTIME=0
+           FLAGS=0x1000
+           FG=0,0
+           BG=0,0,
+           0,0,0,1,
+           0,19,0,0,
+           1,0,0,1,
+           1,19,0,0,
+           2,0,0,1,
+           2,19,0,0,
+           3,0,0,1,
+           3,19,0,0,
+           4,0,0,1,
+           4,5,0x20,0,Hello
+           4,10,0,1,
+           4,19,0,0,
+           5,0,0,1,
+           5,5,0x4,2,World!
+           5,11,0,1,
+           5,19,0,0,
+           6,0,0,1,
+           6,19,0,0,
+           7,0,0,1,
+           7,19,0,0,
+           8,0,0,1,
+           8,19,0,0,
+           9,0,0,1,
+           9,19,0,0,
+           CUR=11,5
+
+       Solaris  <STRONG>getwin</STRONG>  requires  that  all parameters are present, and in the
+       same order.  The <EM>xpg4</EM> curses library does not know about the <STRONG>bce</STRONG>  (back
+       color erase) capability, and does not color the window background.
+
+       On  the  other  hand, the SVr4 curses library does know about the back-
+       ground color.  However, its screen dumps are in binary.   Here  is  the
+       corresponding dump (using "od -t x1"):
+
+           0000000 1c 01 c3 d6 f3 58 05 00 0b 00 0a 00 14 00 00 00
+           0000020 00 00 02 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
+           0000040 00 00 b8 1a 06 08 cc 1a 06 08 00 00 09 00 10 00
+           0000060 00 00 00 80 00 00 20 00 00 00 ff ff ff ff 00 00
+           0000100 ff ff ff ff 00 00 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00
+           0000120 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00
+           *
+           0000620 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 48 80 00 04
+           0000640 65 80 00 04 6c 80 00 04 6c 80 00 04 6f 80 00 04
+           0000660 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00
+           *
+           0000740 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 57 00 81 00
+           0000760 6f 00 81 00 72 00 81 00 6c 00 81 00 64 00 81 00
+           0001000 21 00 81 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00
+           0001020 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00
+           *
+           0001540 20 80 00 00 20 80 00 00 00 00 f6 d1 01 00 f6 d1
+           0001560 08 00 00 00 40 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 07
+           0001600 00 04 00 01 00 01 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 00 00 00
+           0001620 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
+           *
+           0002371
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
 
 
 
 
 
 
-                                                            <STRONG><A HREF="scr_dump.5.html">scr_dump(5)</A></STRONG>
+                                                                   <STRONG><A HREF="scr_dump.5.html">scr_dump(5)</A></STRONG>
 </PRE>
 <div class="nav">
 <ul>
 </PRE>
 <div class="nav">
 <ul>