ncurses 6.1 - patch 20190518
[ncurses.git] / doc / html / man / term.7.html
index 91a55c2df8aa86fa1eb23f4be410ce0dfabf5fc0..50c58d1a466b899ebc91cf3d57160407de5f3a96 100644 (file)
@@ -1,7 +1,6 @@
-<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD HTML 2.0//EN">
 <!-- 
   ****************************************************************************
-  * Copyright (c) 1998-2007,2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.              *
+  * Copyright (c) 1998-2017,2018 Free Software Foundation, Inc.              *
   *                                                                          *
   * Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a  *
   * copy of this software and associated documentation files (the            *
   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
   * authorization.                                                           *
   ****************************************************************************
-  * @Id: term.7,v 1.21 2010/07/31 15:28:39 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: term.7,v 1.26 2018/07/28 22:19:56 tom Exp @
 -->
+<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
 <HTML>
 <HEAD>
+<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
+<meta name="generator" content="Manpage converted by man2html - see https://invisible-island.net/scripts/readme.html#others_scripts">
 <TITLE>term 7</TITLE>
-<link rev=made href="mailto:bug-ncurses@gnu.org">
+<link rel="author" href="mailto:bug-ncurses@gnu.org">
 <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
 </HEAD>
 <BODY>
-<H1>term 7</H1>
-<HR>
+<H1 class="no-header">term 7</H1>
 <PRE>
-<!-- Manpage converted by man2html 3.0.1 -->
-<STRONG><A HREF="term.7.html">term(7)</A></STRONG>                                                         <STRONG><A HREF="term.7.html">term(7)</A></STRONG>
+<STRONG><A HREF="term.7.html">term(7)</A></STRONG>                Miscellaneous Information Manual                <STRONG><A HREF="term.7.html">term(7)</A></STRONG>
 
 
 
 
-</PRE>
-<H2>NAME</H2><PRE>
+</PRE><H2><a name="h2-NAME">NAME</a></H2><PRE>
        term - conventions for naming terminal types
 
 
-</PRE>
-<H2>DESCRIPTION</H2><PRE>
-       The  environment variable <STRONG>TERM</STRONG> should normally contain the
-       type name of the terminal, console or display-device  type
-       you  are  using.   This  information  is  critical for all
-       screen-oriented  programs,  including  your   editor   and
-       mailer.
-
-       A  default  <STRONG>TERM</STRONG>  value will be set on a per-line basis by
-       either  <STRONG>/etc/inittab</STRONG>  (e.g.,  System-V-like   UNIXes)   or
-       <STRONG>/etc/ttys</STRONG>  (BSD  UNIXes).  This will nearly always suffice
-       for workstation and microcomputer consoles.
-
-       If you use a dialup line, the type of device  attached  to
-       it  may vary.  Older UNIX systems pre-set a very dumb ter-
-       minal type like `dumb' or `dialup' on dialup lines.  Newer
-       ones may pre-set `vt100', reflecting the prevalence of DEC
-       VT100-compatible terminals  and  personal-computer  emula-
-       tors.
-
-       Modern  telnets  pass  your <STRONG>TERM</STRONG> environment variable from
-       the local side to the remote one.  There can  be  problems
-       if  the  remote terminfo or termcap entry for your type is
-       not compatible with yours, but this situation is rare  and
-       can  almost  always  be  avoided  by  explicitly exporting
-       `vt100' (assuming you are in fact using  a  VT100-superset
-       console, terminal, or terminal emulator.)
-
-       In any case, you are free to override the system <STRONG>TERM</STRONG> set-
-       ting to your taste in your  shell  profile.   The  <STRONG><A HREF="tset.1.html">tset(1)</A></STRONG>
-       utility  may  be  of  assistance; you can give it a set of
-       rules for deducing or requesting a terminal type based  on
-       the tty device and baud rate.
-
-       Setting your own <STRONG>TERM</STRONG> value may also be useful if you have
-       created a custom entry incorporating options (such as vis-
-       ual  bell or reverse-video) which you wish to override the
-       system default type for your line.
-
-       Terminal type descriptions are stored as files of capabil-
-       ity data underneath /usr/share/terminfo.  To browse a list
-       of all terminal names recognized by the system, do
+</PRE><H2><a name="h2-DESCRIPTION">DESCRIPTION</a></H2><PRE>
+       The  environment variable <STRONG>TERM</STRONG> should normally contain the type name of
+       the terminal, console or  display-device  type  you  are  using.   This
+       information  is  critical  for  all screen-oriented programs, including
+       your editor and mailer.
+
+       A default <STRONG>TERM</STRONG> value  will  be  set  on  a  per-line  basis  by  either
+       <STRONG>/etc/inittab</STRONG>  (e.g.,  System-V-like  UNIXes) or <STRONG>/etc/ttys</STRONG> (BSD UNIXes).
+       This will nearly always suffice for workstation and microcomputer  con-
+       soles.
+
+       If  you  use a dialup line, the type of device attached to it may vary.
+       Older UNIX systems pre-set a very dumb terminal  type  like  "dumb"  or
+       "dialup"  on  dialup lines.  Newer ones may pre-set "vt100", reflecting
+       the prevalence of DEC VT100-compatible terminals and  personal-computer
+       emulators.
+
+       Modern  telnets pass your <STRONG>TERM</STRONG> environment variable from the local side
+       to the remote one.  There can be problems if  the  remote  terminfo  or
+       termcap entry for your type is not compatible with yours, but this sit-
+       uation is rare and can almost always be avoided by explicitly exporting
+       "vt100"  (assuming you are in fact using a VT100-superset console, ter-
+       minal, or terminal emulator.)
+
+       In any case, you are free to override the system <STRONG>TERM</STRONG> setting  to  your
+       taste in your shell profile.  The <STRONG><A HREF="tset.1.html">tset(1)</A></STRONG> utility may be of assistance;
+       you can give it a set of rules for deducing or  requesting  a  terminal
+       type based on the tty device and baud rate.
+
+       Setting  your  own  <STRONG>TERM</STRONG> value may also be useful if you have created a
+       custom entry incorporating options (such as  visual  bell  or  reverse-
+       video)  which  you  wish  to  override the system default type for your
+       line.
+
+       Terminal type descriptions are  stored  as  files  of  capability  data
+       underneath /usr/share/terminfo.  To browse a list of all terminal names
+       recognized by the system, do
 
             toe | more
 
-       from your shell.  These capability files are in  a  binary
-       format optimized for retrieval speed (unlike the old text-
-       based <STRONG>termcap</STRONG> format they replace); to examine  an  entry,
-       you  must  use the <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG> command.  Invoke it as fol-
-       lows:
+       from your shell.  These capability files are in a binary  format  opti-
+       mized  for  retrieval  speed  (unlike the old text-based <STRONG>termcap</STRONG> format
+       they replace); to examine an entry, you must use the  <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>  com-
+       mand.  Invoke it as follows:
 
             infocmp <EM>entry</EM><STRONG>_</STRONG><EM>name</EM>
 
-       where <EM>entry</EM><STRONG>_</STRONG><EM>name</EM> is the name of the type you wish to exam-
-       ine  (and the name of its capability file the subdirectory
-       of /usr/share/terminfo named for its first letter).   This
-       command  dumps  a  capability  file  in  the  text  format
-       described by <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>.
-
-       The first line of  a  <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>  description  gives  the
-       names by which terminfo knows a terminal, separated by `|'
-       (pipe-bar) characters with the last name field  terminated
-       by  a  comma.   The first name field is the type's <EM>primary</EM>
-       <EM>name</EM>, and is the one to use when setting <STRONG>TERM</STRONG>.   The  last
-       name  field  (if  distinct  from  the first) is actually a
-       description of the terminal type (it may  contain  blanks;
-       the others must be single words).  Name fields between the
-       first and last (if present) are aliases for the  terminal,
-       usually historical names retained for compatibility.
-
-       There are some conventions for how to choose terminal pri-
-       mary names that help keep  them  informative  and  unique.
-       Here is a step-by-step guide to naming terminals that also
-       explains how to parse them:
-
-       First, choose a root name.  The root  will  consist  of  a
-       lower-case  letter followed by up to seven lower-case let-
-       ters or digits.  You need to avoid using punctuation char-
-       acters  in  root  names,  because they are used and inter-
-       preted as filenames and shell meta-characters (such as  !,
-       $,  *, ?, etc.) embedded in them may cause odd and unhelp-
-       ful behavior.  The slash (/), or any other character  that
-       may  be  interpreted by anyone's file system (\, $, [, ]),
-       is especially dangerous (terminfo is platform-independent,
-       and  choosing  names with special characters could someday
-       make life difficult for users of a future port).  The  dot
-       (.)  character  is  relatively safe as long as there is at
-       most one per root name; some historical terminfo names use
-       it.
-
-       The  root  name for a terminal or workstation console type
-       should almost always begin with a vendor prefix  (such  as
-       <STRONG>hp</STRONG>  for Hewlett-Packard, <STRONG>wy</STRONG> for Wyse, or <STRONG>att</STRONG> for AT&amp;T ter-
-       minals), or a common name of the terminal line (<STRONG>vt</STRONG> for the
-       VT  series of terminals from DEC, or <STRONG>sun</STRONG> for Sun Microsys-
-       tems workstation consoles, or <STRONG>regent</STRONG> for the  ADDS  Regent
-       series.   You  can list the terminfo tree to see what pre-
-       fixes are already in common use.   The  root  name  prefix
-       should  be  followed  when  appropriate by a model number;
-       thus <STRONG>vt100</STRONG>, <STRONG>hp2621</STRONG>, <STRONG>wy50</STRONG>.
-
-       The root name for a PC-Unix console type should be the  OS
-       name,  i.e., <STRONG>linux</STRONG>, <STRONG>bsdos</STRONG>, <STRONG>freebsd</STRONG>, <STRONG>netbsd</STRONG>.  It should <EM>not</EM>
-       be <STRONG>console</STRONG> or any other generic that might cause confusion
-       in  a  multi-platform environment!  If a model number fol-
-       lows, it should indicate either the OS  release  level  or
-       the console driver release level.
-
-       The  root  name  for a terminal emulator (assuming it does
-       not fit one of the standard ANSI or vt100 types) should be
-       the program name or a readily recognizable abbreviation of
-       it (i.e., <STRONG>versaterm</STRONG>, <STRONG>ctrm</STRONG>).
-
-       Following the root name, you may add any reasonable number
-       of hyphen-separated feature suffixes.
+       where  <EM>entry</EM><STRONG>_</STRONG><EM>name</EM>  is the name of the type you wish to examine (and the
+       name of its capability file  the  subdirectory  of  /usr/share/terminfo
+       named  for  its first letter).  This command dumps a capability file in
+       the text format described by <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>.
+
+       The first line of a <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG> description gives the  names  by  which
+       terminfo  knows a terminal, separated by "|" (pipe-bar) characters with
+       the last name field terminated by a comma.  The first name field is the
+       type's <EM>primary</EM> <EM>name</EM>, and is the one to use when setting <STRONG>TERM</STRONG>.  The last
+       name field (if distinct from the first) is actually  a  description  of
+       the  terminal  type  (it  may contain blanks; the others must be single
+       words).  Name fields between  the  first  and  last  (if  present)  are
+       aliases for the terminal, usually historical names retained for compat-
+       ibility.
+
+       There are some conventions for how to  choose  terminal  primary  names
+       that  help  keep  them  informative and unique.  Here is a step-by-step
+       guide to naming terminals that also explains how to parse them:
+
+       First, choose a root name.  The root will consist of a lower-case  let-
+       ter  followed by up to seven lower-case letters or digits.  You need to
+       avoid using punctuation characters in root names, because they are used
+       and  interpreted  as filenames and shell meta-characters (such as !, $,
+       *, ?, etc.) embedded in them may cause odd and unhelpful behavior.  The
+       slash  (/),  or any other character that may be interpreted by anyone's
+       file system (\, $, [, ]), is especially dangerous  (terminfo  is  plat-
+       form-independent,  and  choosing  names  with  special characters could
+       someday make life difficult for users of a future port).  The  dot  (.)
+       character  is  relatively safe as long as there is at most one per root
+       name; some historical terminfo names use it.
+
+       The root name for a terminal or workstation console type should  almost
+       always  begin  with a vendor prefix (such as <STRONG>hp</STRONG> for Hewlett-Packard, <STRONG>wy</STRONG>
+       for Wyse, or <STRONG>att</STRONG> for AT&amp;T terminals), or a common name of the  terminal
+       line  (<STRONG>vt</STRONG>  for  the  VT  series  of  terminals from DEC, or <STRONG>sun</STRONG> for Sun
+       Microsystems workstation  consoles,  or  <STRONG>regent</STRONG>  for  the  ADDS  Regent
+       series.   You  can  list  the  terminfo  tree  to see what prefixes are
+       already in common use.  The root name prefix should  be  followed  when
+       appropriate by a model number; thus <STRONG>vt100</STRONG>, <STRONG>hp2621</STRONG>, <STRONG>wy50</STRONG>.
+
+       The  root  name for a PC-Unix console type should be the OS name, i.e.,
+       <STRONG>linux</STRONG>, <STRONG>bsdos</STRONG>, <STRONG>freebsd</STRONG>, <STRONG>netbsd</STRONG>.  It should <EM>not</EM> be <STRONG>console</STRONG> or  any  other
+       generic that might cause confusion in a multi-platform environment!  If
+       a model number follows, it should indicate either the OS release  level
+       or the console driver release level.
+
+       The  root name for a terminal emulator (assuming it does not fit one of
+       the standard ANSI or vt100 types) should be the program name or a read-
+       ily recognizable abbreviation of it (i.e., <STRONG>versaterm</STRONG>, <STRONG>ctrm</STRONG>).
+
+       Following  the  root name, you may add any reasonable number of hyphen-
+       separated feature suffixes.
 
        2p   Has two pages of memory.  Likewise 4p, 8p, etc.
 
-       mc   Magic-cookie.   Some  terminals (notably older Wyses)
-            can only support one attribute  without  magic-cookie
-            lossage.   Their  base  entry  is usually paired with
-            another that has this suffix and uses  magic  cookies
-            to support multiple attributes.
+       mc   Magic-cookie.  Some terminals (notably older Wyses) can only  sup-
+            port one attribute without magic-cookie lossage.  Their base entry
+            is usually paired with another that has this suffix and uses magic
+            cookies to support multiple attributes.
 
        -am  Enable auto-margin (right-margin wraparound).
 
        -m   Mono mode - suppress color support.
 
-       -na  No  arrow keys - termcap ignores arrow keys which are
-            actually there on the terminal, so the user  can  use
-            the arrow keys locally.
+       -na  No  arrow  keys  -  termcap  ignores arrow keys which are actually
+            there on the terminal, so the user can use the arrow keys locally.
 
        -nam No auto-margin - suppress am capability.
 
 
        -w   Wide; terminal is in 132 column mode.
 
-       Conventionally,   if  your  terminal  type  is  a  variant
-       intended to specify a line height, that suffix  should  go
-       first.  So, for a hypothetical FuBarCo model 2317 terminal
-       in 30-line mode with reverse video,  best  form  would  be
-       <STRONG>fubar-30-rv</STRONG> (rather than, say, `fubar-rv-30').
+       Conventionally, if your terminal type is a variant intended to  specify
+       a  line  height,  that  suffix should go first.  So, for a hypothetical
+       FuBarCo model 2317 terminal in 30-line mode with  reverse  video,  best
+       form would be <STRONG>fubar-30-rv</STRONG> (rather than, say, "fubar-rv-30").
 
-       Terminal types that are written not as standalone entries,
-       but rather as components to be plugged into other  entries
-       via  <STRONG>use</STRONG> capabilities, are distinguished by using embedded
-       plus signs rather than dashes.
+       Terminal  types  that are written not as standalone entries, but rather
+       as components to be plugged into other entries  via  <STRONG>use</STRONG>  capabilities,
+       are distinguished by using embedded plus signs rather than dashes.
 
-       Commands which use a  terminal  type  to  control  display
-       often  accept  a  -T  option  that accepts a terminal name
-       argument.  Such programs should  fall  back  on  the  <STRONG>TERM</STRONG>
-       environment variable when no -T option is specified.
+       Commands which use a terminal type to control display often accept a -T
+       option that accepts a terminal name  argument.   Such  programs  should
+       fall  back on the <STRONG>TERM</STRONG> environment variable when no -T option is speci-
+       fied.
 
 
-</PRE>
-<H2>PORTABILITY</H2><PRE>
-       For  maximum  compatibility  with  older  System V UNIXes,
-       names and aliases should be unique  within  the  first  14
-       characters.
+</PRE><H2><a name="h2-PORTABILITY">PORTABILITY</a></H2><PRE>
+       For maximum compatibility with older System V UNIXes, names and aliases
+       should be unique within the first 14 characters.
 
 
-</PRE>
-<H2>FILES</H2><PRE>
+</PRE><H2><a name="h2-FILES">FILES</a></H2><PRE>
        /usr/share/terminfo/?/*
             compiled terminal capability data base
 
             tty line initialization (BSD-like UNIXes)
 
 
-</PRE>
-<H2>SEE ALSO</H2><PRE>
+</PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="term.5.html">term(5)</A></STRONG>.
 
 
 
-                                                                <STRONG><A HREF="term.7.html">term(7)</A></STRONG>
+                                                                       <STRONG><A HREF="term.7.html">term(7)</A></STRONG>
 </PRE>
-<HR>
-<ADDRESS>
-Man(1) output converted with
-<a href="http://www.oac.uci.edu/indiv/ehood/man2html.html">man2html</a>
-</ADDRESS>
+<div class="nav">
+<ul>
+<li><a href="#h2-NAME">NAME</a></li>
+<li><a href="#h2-DESCRIPTION">DESCRIPTION</a></li>
+<li><a href="#h2-PORTABILITY">PORTABILITY</a></li>
+<li><a href="#h2-FILES">FILES</a></li>
+<li><a href="#h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></li>
+</ul>
+</div>
 </BODY>
 </HTML>