ncurses 5.5
[ncurses.git] / doc / html / man / terminfo.5.html
index 366da6548e31edd0b0195816a92efefb7161415c..d0d65def47a67371598f3a4409c4ccd91fb7e7c5 100644 (file)
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
   * Note: this must be run through tbl before nroff.
   * The magic cookie on the first line triggers this under some man programs.
   ****************************************************************************
-  * Copyright (c) 1998-2000,2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.              *
+  * Copyright (c) 1998-2002,2004 Free Software Foundation, Inc.              *
   *                                                                          *
   * Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a  *
   * copy of this software and associated documentation files (the            *
   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
   * authorization.                                                           *
   ****************************************************************************
-  * @Id: terminfo.head,v 1.10 2002/08/17 23:37:10 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: terminfo.head,v 1.12 2004/09/25 19:07:11 tom Exp @
   * Head of terminfo man page ends here
-  * @Id: terminfo.tail,v 1.35 2002/04/20 16:49:33 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: terminfo.tail,v 1.42 2005/06/25 22:46:03 tom Exp @
   * Beginning of terminfo.tail file
+  * See "terminfo.head" for copyright.
+  *.in -2
+  *.in +2
+  *.in -2
+  *.in +2
   *.TH
 -->
 <HTML>
 <HR>
 <PRE>
 <!-- Manpage converted by man2html 3.0.1 -->
+<STRONG><A HREF="TERMINFO.5.html">TERMINFO(5)</A></STRONG>                   File Formats                  <STRONG><A HREF="TERMINFO.5.html">TERMINFO(5)</A></STRONG>
+
+
+
 
 </PRE>
 <H2>NAME</H2><PRE>
        no blanks; the last name may well contain upper  case  and
        blanks for readability.
 
+       Lines beginning with a `#' in the first column are treated
+       as comments.  While comment lines are legal at any  point,
+       the  output  of  <EM>captoinfo</EM> and <EM>infotocap</EM> (aliases for <EM>tic</EM>)
+       will move comments so they occur only between entries.
+
+       Newlines and leading  tabs  may  be  used  for  formatting
+       entries  for  readability.   These are removed from parsed
+       entries.  The <EM>infocmp</EM> <EM>-f</EM> option relies on this  to  format
+       if-then-else expressions: the result can be read by <EM>tic</EM>.
+
        Terminal names (except for the last, verbose entry) should
        be chosen using the following conventions.  The particular
        piece  of  hardware  making  up the terminal should have a
        vt100-w.  The following suffixes should be used where pos-
        sible:
 
+
       <STRONG>Suffix</STRONG>                  <STRONG>Meaning</STRONG>                   <STRONG>Example</STRONG>
       -<EM>nn</EM>      Number of lines on the screen            aaa-60
       -<EM>n</EM>p      Number of pages of memory                c100-4p
       -rv      Reverse video                            c100-rv
       -s       Enable status line                       vt100-s
       -vb      Use visible bell instead of beep         wy370-vb
+
       -w       Wide mode (&gt; 80 columns, usually 132)    vt100-w
 
        For  more  on terminal naming conventions, see the <STRONG>term(7)</STRONG>
 
        These are the boolean capabilities:
 
+
                <STRONG>Variable</STRONG>          <STRONG>Cap-</STRONG>  <STRONG>TCap</STRONG>      <STRONG>Description</STRONG>
                <STRONG>Booleans</STRONG>          <STRONG>name</STRONG>  <STRONG>Code</STRONG>
        auto_left_margin          bw    bw    cub1 wraps from col-
        can_change                ccc   cc    terminal can re-
                                              define existing col-
                                              ors
-
        ceol_standout_glitch      xhp   xs    standout not erased
                                              by overwriting (hp)
        col_addr_glitch           xhpa  YA    only positive motion
                                              for hpa/mhpa caps
+
+
+
        cpi_changes_res           cpix  YF    changing character
                                              pitch changes reso-
                                              lution
                                              f2=ctrl C)
        no_pad_char               npc   NP    pad character does
                                              not exist
-
-
        non_dest_scroll_region    ndscr ND    scrolling region is
                                              non-destructive
        non_rev_rmcup             nrrmc NR    smcup does not
                                              on the status line
        tilde_glitch              hz    hz    cannot print ~'s
                                              (hazeltine)
+
+
        transparent_underline     ul    ul    underline character
                                              overstrikes
        xon_xoff                  xon   xo    terminal uses
 
        These are the numeric capabilities:
 
+
             <STRONG>Variable</STRONG>         <STRONG>Cap-</STRONG>     <STRONG>TCap</STRONG>       <STRONG>Description</STRONG>
              <STRONG>Numeric</STRONG>         <STRONG>name</STRONG>     <STRONG>Code</STRONG>
        columns               cols     co     number of columns in
        no_color_video        ncv      NC     video attributes
                                              that cannot be used
                                              with colors
-
-
        num_labels            nlab     Nl     number of labels on
                                              screen
        padding_baud_rate     pb       pb     lowest baud rate
        SVr4.0 term structure, but are not yet documented  in  the
        man page.  They came in with SVr4's printer support.
 
+
              <STRONG>Variable</STRONG>         <STRONG>Cap-</STRONG>    <STRONG>TCap</STRONG>       <STRONG>Description</STRONG>
              <STRONG>Numeric</STRONG>          <STRONG>name</STRONG>    <STRONG>Code</STRONG>
        bit_image_entwining    bitwin  Yo     number of passes for
        dot_horz_spacing       spinh   Yc     spacing of dots hor-
                                              izontally in dots
                                              per inch
+
        dot_vert_spacing       spinv   Yb     spacing of pins ver-
                                              tically in pins per
                                              inch
                                              in units per inch
        print_rate             cps     Ym     print rate in char-
                                              acters per second
-
-
        wide_char_size         widcs   Yn     character step size
                                              when in double wide
                                              mode
 
        These are the string capabilities:
 
+
                <STRONG>Variable</STRONG>          <STRONG>Cap-</STRONG>   <STRONG>TCap</STRONG>     <STRONG>Description</STRONG>
                 <STRONG>String</STRONG>           <STRONG>name</STRONG>   <STRONG>Code</STRONG>
        acs_chars                 acsc   ac   graphics charset
                                              home cursor (P*)
        clr_bol                   el1    cb   Clear to beginning
                                              of line
+
+
        clr_eol                   el     ce   clear to end of line
                                              (P)
        clr_eos                   ed     cd   clear to end of
        cursor_address            cup    cm   move to row #1
                                              columns #2
        cursor_down               cud1   do   down one line
-
-
        cursor_home               home   ho   home cursor (if no
                                              cup)
        cursor_invisible          civis  vi   make cursor invisi-
        enter_italics_mode        sitm   ZH   Enter italic mode
        enter_leftward_mode       slm    ZI   Start leftward car-
                                              riage motion
+
        enter_micro_mode          smicm  ZJ   Start micro-motion
                                              mode
-
        enter_near_letter_quality snlq   ZK   Enter NLQ mode
        enter_normal_quality      snrmq  ZL   Enter normal-quality
                                              mode
        flash_hook                hook   fh   flash switch hook
        flash_screen              flash  vb   visible bell (may
                                              not move cursor)
-
        form_feed                 ff     ff   hardcopy terminal
                                              page eject (P*)
        from_status_line          fsl    fs   return from status
                                              string
        init_2string              is2    is   initialization
                                              string
+
        init_3string              is3    i3   initialization
                                              string
        init_file                 if     if   name of initializa-
                                              in insert mode
        key_end                   kend   @7   end key
        key_enter                 kent   @8   enter/send key
-
-
        key_eol                   kel    kE   clear-to-end-of-line
                                              key
        key_eos                   ked    kS   clear-to-end-of-
        key_f22                   kf22   FC   F22 function key
        key_f23                   kf23   FD   F23 function key
        key_f24                   kf24   FE   F24 function key
+
        key_f25                   kf25   FF   F25 function key
        key_f26                   kf26   FG   F26 function key
        key_f27                   kf27   FH   F27 function key
        key_f5                    kf5    k5   F5 function key
        key_f50                   kf50   Fe   F50 function key
        key_f51                   kf51   Ff   F51 function key
-
        key_f52                   kf52   Fg   F52 function key
        key_f53                   kf53   Fh   F53 function key
        key_f54                   kf54   Fi   F54 function key
        key_previous              kprv   %8   previous key
        key_print                 kprt   %9   print key
        key_redo                  krdo   %0   redo key
+
        key_reference             kref   &amp;1   reference key
        key_refresh               krfr   &amp;2   refresh key
        key_replace               krpl   &amp;3   replace key
                                              key
        key_select                kslt   *6   select key
        key_send                  kEND   *7   shifted end key
-
        key_seol                  kEOL   *8   shifted clear-to-
                                              end-of-line key
        key_sexit                 kEXT   *9   shifted exit key
                                              key f3 if not f3
        lab_f4                    lf4    l4   label on function
                                              key f4 if not f4
+
+
        lab_f5                    lf5    l5   label on function
                                              key f5 if not f5
        lab_f6                    lf6    l6   label on function
                                              key f6 if not f6
        lab_f7                    lf7    l7   label on function
                                              key f7 if not f7
-
-
        lab_f8                    lf8    l8   label on function
                                              key f8 if not f8
        lab_f9                    lf9    l9   label on function
                                              sor in micro mode
        parm_rindex               rin    SR   scroll back #1 lines
                                              (P)
-
        parm_up_cursor            cuu    UP   up #1 lines (P*)
        parm_up_micro             mcuu   Zi   Like parm_up_cursor
                                              in micro mode
        pkey_key                  pfkey  pk   program function key
                                              #1 to type string #2
+
+
        pkey_local                pfloc  pl   program function key
                                              #1 to execute string
                                              #2
                                              line #1 or (if smgtp
                                              is not given) #2
                                              lines from bottom
-
        set_clock                 sclk   SC   set clock, #1 hrs #2
                                              mins #3 secs
        set_color_pair            scp    sp   Set current color
                                              umn
        set_right_margin_parm     smgrp  Zn   Set right margin at
                                              column #1
+
        set_tab                   hts    st   set a tab in every
                                              row, current columns
        set_top_margin            smgt   Zo   Set top margin at
                                              move past it
        up_half_line              hu     hu   half a line up
        user0                     u0     u0   User string #0
-
        user1                     u1     u1   User string #1
        user2                     u2     u2   User string #2
        user3                     u3     u3   User string #3
        SVr4.0  term structure, but were originally not documented
        in the man page.
 
+
                <STRONG>Variable</STRONG>          <STRONG>Cap-</STRONG>     <STRONG>TCap</STRONG>    <STRONG>Description</STRONG>
                 <STRONG>String</STRONG>           <STRONG>name</STRONG>     <STRONG>Code</STRONG>
        alt_scancode_esc          scesa    S8   Alternate escape
                                                of same row
        bit_image_newline         binel    Zz   Move to next row
                                                of the bit image
+
        bit_image_repeat          birep    Xy   Repeat bit image
                                                cell #1 #2 times
        char_set_names            csnm     Zy   Produce #1'th item
                                                mode
        exit_pc_charset_mode      rmpch    S3   Exit PC character
                                                display mode
-
        exit_scancode_mode        rmsc     S5   Exit PC scancode
                                                mode
        get_mouse                 getm     Gm   Curses should get
                                                cap).
        set_page_length           slines   YZ   Set page length to
                                                #1 lines
+
        set_tb_margin             smgtb    MT   Sets both top and
                                                bottom margins to
                                                #1, #2
         these, they may not be binary-compatible  with  System  V
         terminfo entries after SVr4.1; beware!
 
-                <STRONG>Variable</STRONG>         <STRONG>Cap-</STRONG>   <STRONG>TCap</STRONG>     <STRONG>Description</STRONG>
 
+                <STRONG>Variable</STRONG>         <STRONG>Cap-</STRONG>   <STRONG>TCap</STRONG>     <STRONG>Description</STRONG>
                  <STRONG>String</STRONG>          <STRONG>name</STRONG>   <STRONG>Code</STRONG>
         enter_horizontal_hl_mode ehhlm  Xh   Enter horizontal
                                              highlight mode
        space at the beginning of  each  line  except  the  first.
        Comments  may  be  included on lines beginning with ``#''.
        Capabilities in <EM>terminfo</EM> are of three types: Boolean capa-
-       bilities which indicate that the terminal has some partic-
-       ular feature, numeric capabilities giving the size of  the
-       terminal  or  the  size  of  particular delays, and string
-       capabilities, which give a sequence which can be  used  to
-       perform particular terminal operations.
+       bilities   which  indicate  that  the  terminal  has  some
+       particular feature, numeric capabilities giving  the  size
+       of  the  terminal  or  the  size of particular delays, and
+       string capabilities, which give a sequence  which  can  be
+       used to perform particular terminal operations.
 
 
    <STRONG>Types</STRONG> <STRONG>of</STRONG> <STRONG>Capabilities</STRONG>
        To do this, put a period before the capability name.   For
        example, see the second <STRONG>ind</STRONG> in the example above.
 
+
    <STRONG>Fetching</STRONG> <STRONG>Compiled</STRONG> <STRONG>Descriptions</STRONG>
        If  the environment variable TERMINFO is set, it is inter-
        preted as the pathname of a directory containing the  com-
        beginning  of the next line when it reaches the right mar-
        gin, then it should have the <STRONG>am</STRONG> capability.  If the termi-
        nal  can  clear its screen, leaving the cursor in the home
-       position,  then  this  is  given  by  the   <STRONG>clear</STRONG>   string
-       capability.   If  the  terminal  overstrikes  (rather than
-       clearing a position when a character is struck over)  then
-       it  should  have  the <STRONG>os</STRONG> capability.  If the terminal is a
-       printing terminal, with no soft copy unit, give it both <STRONG>hc</STRONG>
-       and  <STRONG>os</STRONG>.   (<STRONG>os</STRONG> applies to storage scope terminals, such as
-       TEKTRONIX 4010 series, as well as hard copy and APL termi-
-       nals.)   If there is a code to move the cursor to the left
-       edge of the current row, give this as <STRONG>cr</STRONG>.  (Normally  this
-       will  be  carriage return, control M.)  If there is a code
-       to produce an audible signal (bell, beep, etc)  give  this
-       as <STRONG>bel</STRONG>.
-
-       If  there is a code to move the cursor one position to the
-       left (such as backspace) that capability should  be  given
-       as  <STRONG>cub1</STRONG>.   Similarly, codes to move to the right, up, and
+       position, then this is given by the <STRONG>clear</STRONG> string  capabil-
+       ity.   If the terminal overstrikes (rather than clearing a
+       position when a character is struck over) then  it  should
+       have  the  <STRONG>os</STRONG>  capability.   If the terminal is a printing
+       terminal, with no soft copy unit, give it both <STRONG>hc</STRONG> and  <STRONG>os</STRONG>.
+       (<STRONG>os</STRONG>  applies to storage scope terminals, such as TEKTRONIX
+       4010 series, as well as hard copy and APL terminals.)   If
+       there is a code to move the cursor to the left edge of the
+       current row, give this as <STRONG>cr</STRONG>.  (Normally this will be car-
+       riage  return,  control M.)  If there is a code to produce
+       an audible signal (bell, beep, etc) give this as <STRONG>bel</STRONG>.
+
+       If there is a code to move the cursor one position to  the
+       left  (such  as backspace) that capability should be given
+       as <STRONG>cub1</STRONG>.  Similarly, codes to move to the right,  up,  and
        down should be given as <STRONG>cuf1</STRONG>, <STRONG>cuu1</STRONG>, and <STRONG>cud1</STRONG>.  These local
-       cursor  motions  should not alter the text they pass over,
-       for example, you would not normally use  `<STRONG>cuf1</STRONG>= '  because
+       cursor motions should not alter the text they  pass  over,
+       for  example,  you would not normally use `<STRONG>cuf1</STRONG>= ' because
        the space would erase the character moved over.
 
-       A  very  important  point  here  is  that the local cursor
-       motions encoded in <EM>terminfo</EM> are undefined at the left  and
-       top  edges  of  a  CRT  terminal.   Programs  should never
-       attempt to backspace around the left edge,  unless  <STRONG>bw</STRONG>  is
+       A very important point  here  is  that  the  local  cursor
+       motions  encoded in <EM>terminfo</EM> are undefined at the left and
+       top edges  of  a  CRT  terminal.   Programs  should  never
+       attempt  to  backspace  around the left edge, unless <STRONG>bw</STRONG> is
        given, and never attempt to go up locally off the top.  In
-       order to scroll text up, a program will go to  the  bottom
+       order  to  scroll text up, a program will go to the bottom
        left corner of the screen and send the <STRONG>ind</STRONG> (index) string.
 
        To scroll text down, a program goes to the top left corner
-       of  the  screen  and  sends the <STRONG>ri</STRONG> (reverse index) string.
-       The strings <STRONG>ind</STRONG> and <STRONG>ri</STRONG> are undefined  when  not  on  their
+       of the screen and sends the  <STRONG>ri</STRONG>  (reverse  index)  string.
+       The  strings  <STRONG>ind</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>ri</STRONG> are undefined when not on their
        respective corners of the screen.
 
        Parameterized versions of the scrolling sequences are <STRONG>indn</STRONG>
        and <STRONG>rin</STRONG> which have the same semantics as <STRONG>ind</STRONG> and <STRONG>ri</STRONG> except
-       that  they take one parameter, and scroll that many lines.
-       They are also undefined except at the appropriate edge  of
+       that they take one parameter, and scroll that many  lines.
+       They  are also undefined except at the appropriate edge of
        the screen.
 
-       The  <STRONG>am</STRONG>  capability tells whether the cursor sticks at the
-       right edge of the screen when text  is  output,  but  this
+       The <STRONG>am</STRONG> capability tells whether the cursor sticks  at  the
+       right  edge  of  the  screen when text is output, but this
        does not necessarily apply to a <STRONG>cuf1</STRONG> from the last column.
-       The only local motion which is defined from the left  edge
-       is  if  <STRONG>bw</STRONG>  is  given, then a <STRONG>cub1</STRONG> from the left edge will
-       move to the right edge of the previous row.  If <STRONG>bw</STRONG> is  not
-       given,  the effect is undefined.  This is useful for draw-
-       ing a box around the edge of the screen, for example.   If
-       the  terminal has switch selectable automatic margins, the
-       <EM>terminfo</EM> file usually assumes that this is on;  i.e.,  <STRONG>am</STRONG>.
-       If  the  terminal  has  a command which moves to the first
-       column of the next line, that command can be given as  <STRONG>nel</STRONG>
-       (newline).   It  does not matter if the command clears the
-       remainder of the current line, so if the terminal  has  no
-       <STRONG>cr</STRONG>  and <STRONG>lf</STRONG> it may still be possible to craft a working <STRONG>nel</STRONG>
+       The  only local motion which is defined from the left edge
+       is if <STRONG>bw</STRONG> is given, then a <STRONG>cub1</STRONG> from  the  left  edge  will
+       move  to the right edge of the previous row.  If <STRONG>bw</STRONG> is not
+       given, the effect is undefined.  This is useful for  draw-
+       ing  a box around the edge of the screen, for example.  If
+       the terminal has switch selectable automatic margins,  the
+       <EM>terminfo</EM>  file  usually assumes that this is on; i.e., <STRONG>am</STRONG>.
+       If the terminal has a command which  moves  to  the  first
+       column  of the next line, that command can be given as <STRONG>nel</STRONG>
+       (newline).  It does not matter if the command  clears  the
+       remainder  of  the current line, so if the terminal has no
+       <STRONG>cr</STRONG> and <STRONG>lf</STRONG> it may still be possible to craft a working  <STRONG>nel</STRONG>
        out of one or both of them.
 
        These  capabilities  suffice  to  describe  hard-copy  and
-       "glass-tty"  terminals.   Thus  the  model  33 teletype is
+       "glass-tty" terminals.  Thus  the  model  33  teletype  is
        described as
 
-     33|tty33|tty|model 33 teletype,
-     bel=^G, cols#72, cr=^M, cud1=^J, hc, ind=^J, os,
+       33|tty33|tty|model 33 teletype,
+            bel=^G, cols#72, cr=^M, cud1=^J, hc, ind=^J, os,
 
        while the Lear Siegler ADM-3 is described as
 
-     adm3|3|lsi adm3,
-     am, bel=^G, clear=^Z, cols#80, cr=^M, cub1=^H, cud1=^J,
-     ind=^J, lines#24,
+       adm3|3|lsi adm3,
+            am, bel=^G, clear=^Z, cols#80, cr=^M, cub1=^H, cud1=^J,
+            ind=^J, lines#24,
 
 
    <STRONG>Parameterized</STRONG> <STRONG>Strings</STRONG>
-       Cursor addressing and other strings  requiring  parameters
-       in  the  terminal  are described by a parameterized string
-       capability, with <STRONG><A HREF="printf.3S.html">printf(3S)</A></STRONG> like escapes <STRONG>%x</STRONG>  in  it.   For
-       example,  to  address  the  cursor,  the <STRONG>cup</STRONG> capability is
+       Cursor  addressing  and other strings requiring parameters
+       in the terminal are described by  a  parameterized  string
+       capability,  with  <STRONG><A HREF="printf.3S.html">printf(3S)</A></STRONG>  like escapes <STRONG>%x</STRONG> in it.  For
+       example, to address the  cursor,  the  <STRONG>cup</STRONG>  capability  is
        given, using two parameters: the row and column to address
        to.  (Rows and columns are numbered from zero and refer to
        the physical screen visible to the user, not to any unseen
-       memory.)   If  the  terminal  has  memory  relative cursor
+       memory.)  If  the  terminal  has  memory  relative  cursor
        addressing, that can be indicated by <STRONG>mrcup</STRONG>.
 
-       The parameter mechanism uses a stack and special  <STRONG>%</STRONG>  codes
-       to  manipulate  it.  Typically a sequence will push one of
-       the parameters onto the stack and then print  it  in  some
-       format.  Often more complex operations are necessary.
+       The  parameter  mechanism uses a stack and special <STRONG>%</STRONG> codes
+       to manipulate it.  Typically a sequence will push  one  of
+       the  parameters  onto  the stack and then print it in some
+       format.  Print (e.g., "%d")  is  a  special  case.   Other
+       operations,  including  "%t"  pop  their  operand from the
+       stack.  It is noted that more complex operations are often
+       necessary, e.g., in the <STRONG>sgr</STRONG> string.
 
        The <STRONG>%</STRONG> encodings have the following meanings:
 
-            %%        outputs `%'
-            %<EM>[[</EM>:<EM>]flags][width[.precision]][</EM>doxXs<EM>]</EM>
-                      as in <STRONG>printf</STRONG>, flags are [-+#] and space
-            %c        print pop() like %c in printf()
-            %s        print pop() like %s in printf()
-
-            %p[1-9]   push <EM>i</EM>'th parm
-            %P[a-z]   set dynamic variable [a-z] to pop()
-            %g[a-z]   get dynamic variable [a-z] and push it
-            %P[A-Z]   set static variable [a-z] to pop()
-            %g[A-Z]   get static variable [a-z] and push it
-            %'<EM>c</EM>'      char constant <EM>c</EM>
-            %{<EM>nn</EM>}     integer constant <EM>nn</EM>
-            %l        push strlen(pop)
-
-            %+ %- %* %/ %m
-                      arithmetic (%m is mod): push(pop() op pop())
-            %&amp; %| %^  bit operations: push(pop() op pop())
-            %= %&gt; %&lt;  logical operations: push(pop() op pop())
-            %A, %O    logical and &amp; or operations (for conditionals)
-            %! %~     unary operations push(op pop())
-            %i        add 1 to first two parameters (for ANSI terminals)
-
-            %? expr %t thenpart %e elsepart %;
-                      if-then-else, %e elsepart is optional.
-                      else-if's are possible a la Algol 68:
-                      %? c1 %t b1 %e c2 %t b2 %e c3 %t b3 %e c4 %t b4 %e %;
-                      ci are conditions, bi are bodies.
+
+       %%   outputs `%'
+
+       %<EM>[[</EM>:<EM>]flags][width[.precision]][</EM>doxXs<EM>]</EM>
+            as in <STRONG>printf</STRONG>, flags are [-+#] and space
+
+       %c   print pop() like %c in <STRONG>printf</STRONG>
+
+       %s   print pop() like %s in <STRONG>printf</STRONG>
+
+       %p[1-9]
+            push <EM>i</EM>'th parameter
+
+       %P[a-z]
+            set dynamic variable [a-z] to pop()
+
+       %g[a-z]
+            get dynamic variable [a-z] and push it
+
+       %P[A-Z]
+            set static variable [a-z] to pop()
+
+       %g[A-Z]
+            get static variable [a-z] and push it
+
+            The  terms  "static"  and  "dynamic"  are misleading.
+            Historically, these are simply two different sets  of
+            variables,  whose  values are not reset between calls
+            to <STRONG>tparm</STRONG>.  However, that fact is  not  documented  in
+            other  implementations.  Relying on it will adversely
+            impact portability to other implementations.
+
+       %'<EM>c</EM>' char constant <EM>c</EM>
+
+       %{<EM>nn</EM>}
+            integer constant <EM>nn</EM>
+
+       %l   push strlen(pop)
+
+       %+ %- %* %/ %m
+            arithmetic (%m is mod): push(pop() op pop())
+
+       %&amp; %| %^
+            bit operations (AND, OR and exclusive-OR): push(pop()
+            op pop())
+
+       %= %&gt; %&lt;
+            logical operations: push(pop() op pop())
+
+       %A, %O
+            logical AND and OR operations (for conditionals)
+
+       %! %~
+            unary   operations   (logical  and  bit  complement):
+            push(op pop())
+
+       %i   add 1 to first two parameters (for ANSI terminals)
+
+       %? <EM>expr</EM> %t <EM>thenpart</EM> %e <EM>elsepart</EM> %;
+            This forms  an  if-then-else.   The  %e  <EM>elsepart</EM>  is
+            optional.   Usually  the  %? <EM>expr</EM> part pushes a value
+            onto the stack,  and  %t  pops  it  from  the  stack,
+            testing  if  it  is  nonzero  (true).   If it is zero
+            (false), control passes to the %e (else) part.
+
+            It is possible to form else-if's a la Algol 68:
+            %? c1 %t b1 %e c2 %t b2 %e c3 %t b3 %e c4 %t b4 %e %;
+
+            where ci are conditions, bi are bodies.
+
+            Use the <STRONG>-f</STRONG> option of <STRONG>tic</STRONG> or <STRONG>infocmp</STRONG> to see the struc-
+            ture of if-the-else's.  Some strings, e.g.,  <STRONG>sgr</STRONG>  can
+            be very complicated when written on one line.  The <STRONG>-f</STRONG>
+            option splits the string into lines  with  the  parts
+            indented.
 
        Binary operations are in postfix form with the operands in
        the usual order.  That  is,  to  get  x-5  one  would  use
 
        Inserting  lines  at  the  top or bottom of the screen can
        also be done using <STRONG>ri</STRONG> or <STRONG>ind</STRONG> on many terminals  without  a
-       true  insert/delete line, and is often faster even on ter-
-       minals with those features.
+       true  insert/delete  line,  and  is  often  faster even on
+       terminals with those features.
 
        The boolean <STRONG>non_dest_scroll_region</STRONG> should be set  if  each
        scrolling  window  is effectively a view port on a screen-
 
        For example, the DEC vt220 supports most of the modes:
 
+
            <STRONG>tparm</STRONG> <STRONG>parameter</STRONG>   <STRONG>attribute</STRONG>    <STRONG>escape</STRONG> <STRONG>sequence</STRONG>
 
            none              none         \E[0m
        Writing  out  the above sequences, along with their depen-
        dencies yields
 
+
          <STRONG>sequence</STRONG>    <STRONG>when</STRONG> <STRONG>to</STRONG> <STRONG>output</STRONG>     <STRONG>terminfo</STRONG> <STRONG>translation</STRONG>
 
          \E[0       always              \E[0
          ;4         if p2               %?%p2%|%t;4%;
          ;5         if p4               %?%p4%|%t;5%;
          ;7         if p1 or p3         %?%p1%p3%|%t;7%;
-         ;8         if p7               %?%p7%|%t;8%;
 
+         ;8         if p7               %?%p7%|%t;8%;
          m          always              m
          ^N or ^O   if p9 ^N, else ^O   %?%p9%t^N%e^O%;
 
                %?%p4%t;5%;%?%p7%t;8%;m%?%p9%t\016%e\017%;,
 
        Remember that if you specify sgr, you  must  also  specify
-       sgr0.
+       sgr0.   Also, some implementations rely on sgr being given
+       if sgr0 is, Not all terminfo entries necessarily  have  an
+       sgr  string,  however.   Many terminfo entries are derived
+       from termcap entries which have no sgr string.   The  only
+       drawback  to  adding  an  sgr  string is that termcap also
+       assumes that sgr0 does not exit  alternate  character  set
+       mode.
 
        Terminals  with  the ``magic cookie'' glitch (<STRONG>xmc</STRONG>) deposit
        special  ``cookies''  when   they   receive   mode-setting
        <STRONG>rmkx</STRONG>.  Otherwise the keypad is assumed to always transmit.
        The  codes  sent by the left arrow, right arrow, up arrow,
        down arrow, and home keys can be given  as  <STRONG>kcub1,</STRONG>  <STRONG>kcuf1,</STRONG>
-       <STRONG>kcuu1,</STRONG>  <STRONG>kcud1,</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>khome</STRONG>  respectively.   If  there  are
-       function keys such as f0, f1, ...,  f10,  the  codes  they
-       send  can  be given as <STRONG>kf0,</STRONG> <STRONG>kf1,</STRONG> <STRONG>...,</STRONG> <STRONG>kf10</STRONG>.  If these keys
-       have labels other than the default  f0  through  f10,  the
-       labels  can  be  given  as <STRONG>lf0,</STRONG> <STRONG>lf1,</STRONG> <STRONG>...,</STRONG> <STRONG>lf10</STRONG>.  The codes
-       transmitted by certain other special keys  can  be  given:
-       <STRONG>kll</STRONG>  (home  down), <STRONG>kbs</STRONG> (backspace), <STRONG>ktbc</STRONG> (clear all tabs),
-       <STRONG>kctab</STRONG> (clear the tab stop in  this  column),  <STRONG>kclr</STRONG>  (clear
-       screen  or  erase  key),  <STRONG>kdch1</STRONG>  (delete  character), <STRONG>kdl1</STRONG>
-       (delete line), <STRONG>krmir</STRONG> (exit insert mode), <STRONG>kel</STRONG> (clear to end
-       of  line),  <STRONG>ked</STRONG>  (clear  to  end of screen), <STRONG>kich1</STRONG> (insert
-       character or enter insert mode), <STRONG>kil1</STRONG> (insert  line),  <STRONG>knp</STRONG>
-       (next  page),  <STRONG>kpp</STRONG>  (previous  page),  <STRONG>kind</STRONG>  (scroll  for-
-       ward/down), <STRONG>kri</STRONG> (scroll backward/up), <STRONG>khts</STRONG> (set a tab stop
-       in  this column).  In addition, if the keypad has a 3 by 3
-       array of keys including the four  arrow  keys,  the  other
-       five  keys  can  be  given as <STRONG>ka1</STRONG>, <STRONG>ka3</STRONG>, <STRONG>kb2</STRONG>, <STRONG>kc1</STRONG>, and <STRONG>kc3</STRONG>.
-       These keys are useful when the effects of a 3 by 3  direc-
-       tional pad are needed.
-
-       Strings  to  program  function keys can be given as <STRONG>pfkey</STRONG>,
-       <STRONG>pfloc</STRONG>, and <STRONG>pfx</STRONG>.  A string to program screen labels  should
-       be  specified  as  <STRONG>pln</STRONG>.   Each  of these strings takes two
-       parameters: the function key number to program (from 0  to
-       10)  and the string to program it with.  Function key num-
-       bers out of this range may program  undefined  keys  in  a
-       terminal  dependent  manner.   The  difference between the
-       capabilities is that <STRONG>pfkey</STRONG> causes pressing the  given  key
-       to  be the same as the user typing the given string; <STRONG>pfloc</STRONG>
+       <STRONG>kcuu1,</STRONG>  <STRONG>kcud1,</STRONG> and <STRONG>khome</STRONG> respectively.  If there are func-
+       tion keys such as f0, f1, ..., f10, the  codes  they  send
+       can  be  given as <STRONG>kf0,</STRONG> <STRONG>kf1,</STRONG> <STRONG>...,</STRONG> <STRONG>kf10</STRONG>.  If these keys have
+       labels other than the default f0 through f10,  the  labels
+       can  be given as <STRONG>lf0,</STRONG> <STRONG>lf1,</STRONG> <STRONG>...,</STRONG> <STRONG>lf10</STRONG>.  The codes transmit-
+       ted by certain other special keys can be given: <STRONG>kll</STRONG>  (home
+       down),  <STRONG>kbs</STRONG>  (backspace),  <STRONG>ktbc</STRONG>  (clear  all  tabs), <STRONG>kctab</STRONG>
+       (clear the tab stop in this column), <STRONG>kclr</STRONG> (clear screen or
+       erase  key), <STRONG>kdch1</STRONG> (delete character), <STRONG>kdl1</STRONG> (delete line),
+       <STRONG>krmir</STRONG> (exit insert mode), <STRONG>kel</STRONG> (clear to end of line),  <STRONG>ked</STRONG>
+       (clear to end of screen), <STRONG>kich1</STRONG> (insert character or enter
+       insert mode), <STRONG>kil1</STRONG> (insert line),  <STRONG>knp</STRONG>  (next  page),  <STRONG>kpp</STRONG>
+       (previous  page),  <STRONG>kind</STRONG> (scroll forward/down), <STRONG>kri</STRONG> (scroll
+       backward/up), <STRONG>khts</STRONG> (set a tab stop in  this  column).   In
+       addition, if the keypad has a 3 by 3 array of keys includ-
+       ing the four arrow keys, the other five keys can be  given
+       as  <STRONG>ka1</STRONG>,  <STRONG>ka3</STRONG>,  <STRONG>kb2</STRONG>,  <STRONG>kc1</STRONG>, and <STRONG>kc3</STRONG>.  These keys are useful
+       when the effects of a 3 by 3 directional pad are needed.
+
+       Strings to program function keys can be  given  as  <STRONG>pfkey</STRONG>,
+       <STRONG>pfloc</STRONG>,  and <STRONG>pfx</STRONG>.  A string to program screen labels should
+       be specified as <STRONG>pln</STRONG>.  Each  of  these  strings  takes  two
+       parameters:  the function key number to program (from 0 to
+       10) and the string to program it with.  Function key  num-
+       bers  out  of  this  range may program undefined keys in a
+       terminal dependent manner.   The  difference  between  the
+       capabilities  is  that <STRONG>pfkey</STRONG> causes pressing the given key
+       to be the same as the user typing the given string;  <STRONG>pfloc</STRONG>
        causes the string to be executed by the terminal in local;
-       and  <STRONG>pfx</STRONG>  causes  the string to be transmitted to the com-
+       and <STRONG>pfx</STRONG> causes the string to be transmitted  to  the  com-
        puter.
 
        The capabilities <STRONG>nlab</STRONG>, <STRONG>lw</STRONG> and <STRONG>lh</STRONG> define the number of pro-
-       grammable  screen  labels  and their width and height.  If
-       there are commands to turn the labels  on  and  off,  give
-       them  in <STRONG>smln</STRONG> and <STRONG>rmln</STRONG>.  <STRONG>smln</STRONG> is normally output after one
+       grammable screen labels and their width  and  height.   If
+       there  are  commands  to  turn the labels on and off, give
+       them in <STRONG>smln</STRONG> and <STRONG>rmln</STRONG>.  <STRONG>smln</STRONG> is normally output after  one
        or more pln sequences to make sure that the change becomes
        visible.
 
 
    <STRONG>Tabs</STRONG> <STRONG>and</STRONG> <STRONG>Initialization</STRONG>
-       If  the terminal has hardware tabs, the command to advance
-       to the next tab stop can be given as <STRONG>ht</STRONG>  (usually  control
-       I).   A  ``back-tab''  command which moves leftward to the
+       If the terminal has hardware tabs, the command to  advance
+       to  the  next tab stop can be given as <STRONG>ht</STRONG> (usually control
+       I).  A ``back-tab'' command which moves  leftward  to  the
        preceding tab stop can be given as <STRONG>cbt</STRONG>.  By convention, if
-       the  teletype  modes indicate that tabs are being expanded
-       by the computer rather than being sent  to  the  terminal,
-       programs  should  not  use <STRONG>ht</STRONG> or <STRONG>cbt</STRONG> even if they are pre-
-       sent, since the user may not have the tab  stops  properly
-       set.   If  the  terminal  has hardware tabs which are ini-
-       tially set every <EM>n</EM> spaces when the terminal is powered up,
-       the  numeric  parameter <STRONG>it</STRONG> is given, showing the number of
-       spaces the tabs are set to.  This is normally used by  the
-       <EM>tset</EM>  command  to  determine  whether  to set the mode for
-       hardware tab expansion, and whether to set the tab  stops.
-       If  the  terminal  has tab stops that can be saved in non-
-       volatile memory, the terminfo description can assume  that
+       the teletype modes indicate that tabs are  being  expanded
+       by  the  computer  rather than being sent to the terminal,
+       programs should not  use  <STRONG>ht</STRONG>  or  <STRONG>cbt</STRONG>  even  if  they  are
+       present,  since  the user may not have the tab stops prop-
+       erly set.  If the terminal has  hardware  tabs  which  are
+       initially  set every <EM>n</EM> spaces when the terminal is powered
+       up, the numeric parameter <STRONG>it</STRONG> is given, showing the  number
+       of  spaces  the tabs are set to.  This is normally used by
+       the <EM>tset</EM> command to determine whether to set the mode  for
+       hardware  tab expansion, and whether to set the tab stops.
+       If the terminal has tab stops that can be  saved  in  non-
+       volatile  memory, the terminfo description can assume that
        they are properly set.
 
-       Other  capabilities include <STRONG>is1</STRONG>, <STRONG>is2</STRONG>, and <STRONG>is3</STRONG>, initializa-
-       tion strings for the terminal, <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>, the path name  of  a
-       program  to be run to initialize the terminal, and <STRONG>if</STRONG>, the
-       name of a file  containing  long  initialization  strings.
-       These  strings are expected to set the terminal into modes
-       consistent with the  rest  of  the  terminfo  description.
+       Other capabilities include <STRONG>is1</STRONG>, <STRONG>is2</STRONG>, and <STRONG>is3</STRONG>,  initializa-
+       tion  strings  for the terminal, <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>, the path name of a
+       program to be run to initialize the terminal, and <STRONG>if</STRONG>,  the
+       name  of  a  file  containing long initialization strings.
+       These strings are expected to set the terminal into  modes
+       consistent  with  the  rest  of  the terminfo description.
        They are normally sent to the terminal, by the <EM>init</EM> option
-       of the <EM>tput</EM> program, each time the  user  logs  in.   They
-       will  be  printed  in the following order: run the program
-       <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>; output <STRONG>is1</STRONG>; <STRONG>is2</STRONG>; set the margins  using  <STRONG>mgc</STRONG>,  <STRONG>smgl</STRONG>
-       and  <STRONG>smgr</STRONG>;  set tabs using <STRONG>tbc</STRONG> and <STRONG>hts</STRONG>; print the file <STRONG>if</STRONG>;
+       of  the  <EM>tput</EM>  program,  each time the user logs in.  They
+       will be printed in the following order:  run  the  program
+       <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>;  output  <STRONG>is1</STRONG>;  <STRONG>is2</STRONG>; set the margins using <STRONG>mgc</STRONG>, <STRONG>smgl</STRONG>
+       and <STRONG>smgr</STRONG>; set tabs using <STRONG>tbc</STRONG> and <STRONG>hts</STRONG>; print the  file  <STRONG>if</STRONG>;
        and finally output <STRONG>is3</STRONG>.
 
-       Most initialization is done with  <STRONG>is2</STRONG>.   Special  terminal
+       Most  initialization  is  done with <STRONG>is2</STRONG>.  Special terminal
        modes can be set up without duplicating strings by putting
-       the common sequences in <STRONG>is2</STRONG> and special cases in  <STRONG>is1</STRONG>  and
-       <STRONG>is3</STRONG>.   A pair of sequences that does a harder reset from a
-       totally unknown state can be  analogously  given  as  <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>,
-       <STRONG>rs2</STRONG>,  <STRONG>rf</STRONG>, and <STRONG>rs3</STRONG>, analogous to <STRONG>is2</STRONG> and <STRONG>if</STRONG>.  These strings
-       are output by the <EM>reset</EM> program, which is  used  when  the
-       terminal  gets into a wedged state.  Commands are normally
-       placed in <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs2</STRONG> <STRONG>rs3</STRONG> and <STRONG>rf</STRONG> only if they produce  annoy-
-       ing  effects on the screen and are not necessary when log-
-       ging in.  For example, the command to set the  vt100  into
-       80-column  mode  would  normally  be  part  of <STRONG>is2</STRONG>, but it
-       causes an annoying glitch of the screen and  is  not  nor-
-       mally  needed  since the terminal is usually already in 80
+       the  common  sequences in <STRONG>is2</STRONG> and special cases in <STRONG>is1</STRONG> and
+       <STRONG>is3</STRONG>.  A pair of sequences that does a harder reset from  a
+       totally  unknown  state  can  be analogously given as <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>,
+       <STRONG>rs2</STRONG>, <STRONG>rf</STRONG>, and <STRONG>rs3</STRONG>, analogous to <STRONG>is2</STRONG> and <STRONG>if</STRONG>.  These  strings
+       are  output  by  the <EM>reset</EM> program, which is used when the
+       terminal gets into a wedged state.  Commands are  normally
+       placed  in <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs2</STRONG> <STRONG>rs3</STRONG> and <STRONG>rf</STRONG> only if they produce annoy-
+       ing effects on the screen and are not necessary when  log-
+       ging  in.   For example, the command to set the vt100 into
+       80-column mode would normally  be  part  of  <STRONG>is2</STRONG>,  but  it
+       causes  an  annoying  glitch of the screen and is not nor-
+       mally needed since the terminal is usually already  in  80
        column mode.
 
        If there are commands to set and clear tab stops, they can
-       be  given  as <STRONG>tbc</STRONG> (clear all tab stops) and <STRONG>hts</STRONG> (set a tab
-       stop in the current column of every row).  If a more  com-
-       plex  sequence  is  needed  to  set  the  tabs than can be
-       described by this, the sequence can be placed  in  <STRONG>is2</STRONG>  or
+       be given as <STRONG>tbc</STRONG> (clear all tab stops) and <STRONG>hts</STRONG> (set  a  tab
+       stop  in the current column of every row).  If a more com-
+       plex sequence is needed  to  set  the  tabs  than  can  be
+       described  by  this,  the sequence can be placed in <STRONG>is2</STRONG> or
        <STRONG>if</STRONG>.
 
    <STRONG>Delays</STRONG> <STRONG>and</STRONG> <STRONG>Padding</STRONG>
-       Many  older  and  slower  terminals  don't  support either
+       Many older and slower  terminals  do  not  support  either
        XON/XOFF or DTR handshaking, including hard copy terminals
-       and  some  very  archaic CRTs (including, for example, DEC
-       VT100s).  These may require padding characters after  cer-
+       and some very archaic CRTs (including,  for  example,  DEC
+       VT100s).   These may require padding characters after cer-
        tain cursor motions and screen changes.
 
        If the terminal uses xon/xoff handshaking for flow control
-       (that is, it automatically emits ^S back to the host  when
+       (that  is, it automatically emits ^S back to the host when
        its input buffers are close to full), set <STRONG>xon</STRONG>.  This capa-
-       bility suppresses the emission of padding.  You  can  also
-       set  it for memory-mapped console devices effectively that
-       don't have a  speed  limit.   Padding  information  should
-       still  be  included so that routines can make better deci-
+       bility  suppresses  the emission of padding.  You can also
+       set it for memory-mapped console devices effectively  that
+       do  not  have  a  speed limit.  Padding information should
+       still be included so that routines can make  better  deci-
        sions about relative costs, but actual pad characters will
        not be transmitted.
 
-       If  <STRONG>pb</STRONG> (padding baud rate) is given, padding is suppressed
-       at baud rates below the value of <STRONG>pb</STRONG>.  If the entry has  no
-       padding  baud rate, then whether padding is emitted or not
+       If <STRONG>pb</STRONG> (padding baud rate) is given, padding is  suppressed
+       at  baud rates below the value of <STRONG>pb</STRONG>.  If the entry has no
+       padding baud rate, then whether padding is emitted or  not
        is completely controlled by <STRONG>xon</STRONG>.
 
-       If the terminal requires other than a null (zero)  charac-
-       ter  as  a  pad,  then this can be given as <STRONG>pad</STRONG>.  Only the
+       If  the terminal requires other than a null (zero) charac-
+       ter as a pad, then this can be given  as  <STRONG>pad</STRONG>.   Only  the
        first character of the <STRONG>pad</STRONG> string is used.
 
 
    <STRONG>Status</STRONG> <STRONG>Lines</STRONG>
-       Some terminals have an extra `status line'  which  is  not
-       normally  used  by  software  (and thus not counted in the
+       Some  terminals  have  an extra `status line' which is not
+       normally used by software (and thus  not  counted  in  the
        terminal's <STRONG>lines</STRONG> capability).
 
-       The simplest case  is  a  status  line  which  is  cursor-
-       addressable  but  not part of the main scrolling region on
-       the screen; the Heathkit H19 has a  status  line  of  this
-       kind,  as  would  a 24-line VT100 with a 23-line scrolling
-       region set up on initialization.  This situation is  indi-
+       The  simplest  case  is  a  status  line  which is cursor-
+       addressable but not part of the main scrolling  region  on
+       the  screen;  the  Heathkit  H19 has a status line of this
+       kind, as would a 24-line VT100 with  a  23-line  scrolling
+       region  set up on initialization.  This situation is indi-
        cated by the <STRONG>hs</STRONG> capability.
 
        Some terminals with status lines need special sequences to
-       access the status line.   These  may  be  expressed  as  a
+       access  the  status  line.   These  may  be expressed as a
        string with single parameter <STRONG>tsl</STRONG> which takes the cursor to
-       a given zero-origin column on the status line.  The  capa-
-       bility <STRONG>fsl</STRONG> must return to the main-screen cursor positions
-       before the last <STRONG>tsl</STRONG>.  You may need  to  embed  the  string
-       values  of <STRONG>sc</STRONG> (save cursor) and <STRONG>rc</STRONG> (restore cursor) in <STRONG>tsl</STRONG>
-       and <STRONG>fsl</STRONG> to accomplish this.
-
-       The status line is normally assumed to be the  same  width
-       as  the width of the terminal.  If this is untrue, you can
+       a  given  zero-origin  column  on  the  status  line.  The
+       capability <STRONG>fsl</STRONG> must return to the main-screen cursor posi-
+       tions  before  the  last  <STRONG>tsl</STRONG>.   You may need to embed the
+       string values of <STRONG>sc</STRONG> (save cursor) and <STRONG>rc</STRONG> (restore  cursor)
+       in <STRONG>tsl</STRONG> and <STRONG>fsl</STRONG> to accomplish this.
+
+       The  status  line is normally assumed to be the same width
+       as the width of the terminal.  If this is untrue, you  can
        specify it with the numeric capability <STRONG>wsl</STRONG>.
 
-       A command to erase or blank the status line may be  speci-
+       A  command to erase or blank the status line may be speci-
        fied as <STRONG>dsl</STRONG>.
 
-       The   boolean   capability  <STRONG>eslok</STRONG>  specifies  that  escape
+       The  boolean  capability  <STRONG>eslok</STRONG>  specifies   that   escape
        sequences, tabs, etc., work ordinarily in the status line.
 
-       The  <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  implementation does not yet use any of these
-       capabilities.  They are documented here in case they  ever
+       The <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> implementation does not yet use any  of  these
+       capabilities.   They are documented here in case they ever
        become important.
 
 
    <STRONG>Line</STRONG> <STRONG>Graphics</STRONG>
-       Many  terminals  have  alternate character sets useful for
-       forms-drawing.  Terminfo and <STRONG>curses</STRONG> build in  support  for
-       the  drawing  characters supported by the VT100, with some
-       characters from the AT&amp;T  4410v1  added.   This  alternate
+       Many terminals have alternate character  sets  useful  for
+       forms-drawing.   Terminfo  and <STRONG>curses</STRONG> build in support for
+       the drawing characters supported by the VT100,  with  some
+       characters  from  the  AT&amp;T  4410v1 added.  This alternate
        character set may be specified by the <STRONG>acsc</STRONG> capability.
 
+
                 <STRONG>Glyph</STRONG>             <STRONG>ACS</STRONG>            <STRONG>Ascii</STRONG>      <STRONG>VT100</STRONG>
                  <STRONG>Name</STRONG>             <STRONG>Name</STRONG>           <STRONG>Default</STRONG>    <STRONG>Name</STRONG>
        UK pound sign              ACS_STERLING   f          }
        upper right corner         ACS_URCORNER   +          k
        vertical line              ACS_VLINE      |          x
 
-       The  best  way to define a new device's graphics set is to
-       add a column to a copy of this table  for  your  terminal,
-       giving   the   character   which   (when  emitted  between
-       <STRONG>smacs</STRONG>/<STRONG>rmacs</STRONG> switches) will be rendered as the  correspond-
-       ing  graphic.  Then read off the VT100/your terminal char-
-       acter pairs right to left in sequence;  these  become  the
+       The best way to define a new device's graphics set  is  to
+       add  a  column  to a copy of this table for your terminal,
+       giving  the  character   which   (when   emitted   between
+       <STRONG>smacs</STRONG>/<STRONG>rmacs</STRONG>  switches) will be rendered as the correspond-
+       ing graphic.  Then read off the VT100/your terminal  char-
+       acter  pairs  right  to left in sequence; these become the
        ACSC string.
 
 
    <STRONG>Color</STRONG> <STRONG>Handling</STRONG>
-       Most  color  terminals are either `Tektronix-like' or `HP-
-       like'.  Tektronix-like terminals have a predefined set  of
-       N  colors  (where N usually 8), and can set character-cell
+       Most color terminals are either `Tektronix-like'  or  `HP-
+       like'.   Tektronix-like terminals have a predefined set of
+       N colors (where N usually 8), and can  set  character-cell
        foreground and background characters independently, mixing
-       them  into  N  * N color-pairs.  On HP-like terminals, the
+       them into N * N color-pairs.  On  HP-like  terminals,  the
        use must set each color pair up separately (foreground and
-       background  are  not  independently  settable).   Up  to M
-       color-pairs may be  set  up  from  2*M  different  colors.
+       background are  not  independently  settable).   Up  to  M
+       color-pairs  may  be  set  up  from  2*M different colors.
        ANSI-compatible terminals are Tektronix-like.
 
        Some basic color capabilities are independent of the color
        method.  The numeric capabilities <STRONG>colors</STRONG> and <STRONG>pairs</STRONG> specify
-       the  maximum numbers of colors and color-pairs that can be
-       displayed simultaneously.  The <STRONG>op</STRONG> (original  pair)  string
-       resets  foreground  and background colors to their default
-       values for the terminal.  The <STRONG>oc</STRONG> string resets all  colors
-       or  color-pairs  to their default values for the terminal.
-       Some terminals  (including  many  PC  terminal  emulators)
-       erase  screen  areas  with  the  current  background color
-       rather than the power-up default background; these  should
+       the maximum numbers of colors and color-pairs that can  be
+       displayed  simultaneously.   The <STRONG>op</STRONG> (original pair) string
+       resets foreground and background colors to  their  default
+       values  for the terminal.  The <STRONG>oc</STRONG> string resets all colors
+       or color-pairs to their default values for  the  terminal.
+       Some  terminals  (including  many  PC  terminal emulators)
+       erase screen  areas  with  the  current  background  color
+       rather  than the power-up default background; these should
        have the boolean capability <STRONG>bce</STRONG>.
 
-       To  change the current foreground or background color on a
-       Tektronix-type terminal, use <STRONG>setaf</STRONG> (set  ANSI  foreground)
-       and  <STRONG>setab</STRONG>  (set ANSI background) or <STRONG>setf</STRONG> (set foreground)
-       and <STRONG>setb</STRONG> (set background).  These take one parameter,  the
+       To change the current foreground or background color on  a
+       Tektronix-type  terminal,  use <STRONG>setaf</STRONG> (set ANSI foreground)
+       and <STRONG>setab</STRONG> (set ANSI background) or <STRONG>setf</STRONG>  (set  foreground)
+       and  <STRONG>setb</STRONG> (set background).  These take one parameter, the
        color  number.   The  SVr4  documentation  describes  only
-       <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG>; the XPG4 draft says  that  "If  the  terminal
+       <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG>;  the  XPG4  draft  says that "If the terminal
        supports ANSI escape sequences to set background and fore-
-       ground, they should be coded as <STRONG>setaf</STRONG> and  <STRONG>setab</STRONG>,  respec-
-       tively.   If  the terminal supports other escape sequences
-       to set background and foreground, they should be coded  as
-       <STRONG>setf</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>setb</STRONG>, respectively.  The <EM>vidputs()</EM> function and
-       the refresh functions use <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>setab</STRONG>  if  they  are
+       ground,  they  should be coded as <STRONG>setaf</STRONG> and <STRONG>setab</STRONG>, respec-
+       tively.  If the terminal supports other  escape  sequences
+       to  set background and foreground, they should be coded as
+       <STRONG>setf</STRONG> and <STRONG>setb</STRONG>, respectively.  The <EM>vidputs()</EM>  function  and
+       the  refresh  functions  use  <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>  and <STRONG>setab</STRONG> if they are
        defined."
 
-       The  <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG>  and <STRONG>setf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setb</STRONG> capabilities take a single
-       numeric argument each.  Argument values 0-7  are  portably
-       defined  as  follows  (the  middle  column is the symbolic
-       #define available in the header for the <STRONG>curses</STRONG> or  <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>
-       libraries).  The terminal hardware is free to map these as
-       it likes, but the RGB values indicate normal locations  in
-       color space.
+       The <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG> and <STRONG>setf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setb</STRONG> capabilities take  a  single
+       numeric argument each.  Argument values 0-7 of <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG>
+       are portably defined as follows (the middle column is  the
+       symbolic #define available in the header for the <STRONG>curses</STRONG> or
+       <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> libraries).  The terminal hardware is free to  map
+       these  as  it  likes,  but  the RGB values indicate normal
+       locations in color space.
+
 
              <STRONG>Color</STRONG>       <STRONG>#define</STRONG>       <STRONG>Value</STRONG>       <STRONG>RGB</STRONG>
              black     <STRONG>COLOR_BLACK</STRONG>       0     0, 0, 0
              cyan      <STRONG>COLOR_CYAN</STRONG>        6     0,max,max
              white     <STRONG>COLOR_WHITE</STRONG>       7     max,max,max
 
+       The argument values of <STRONG>setf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setb</STRONG>  historically  correspond
+       to a different mapping, i.e.,
+
+
+             <STRONG>Color</STRONG>       <STRONG>#define</STRONG>       <STRONG>Value</STRONG>       <STRONG>RGB</STRONG>
+             black     <STRONG>COLOR_BLACK</STRONG>       0     0, 0, 0
+             blue      <STRONG>COLOR_BLUE</STRONG>        1     0,0,max
+             green     <STRONG>COLOR_GREEN</STRONG>       2     0,max,0
+             cyan      <STRONG>COLOR_CYAN</STRONG>        3     0,max,max
+             red       <STRONG>COLOR_RED</STRONG>         4     max,0,0
+             magenta   <STRONG>COLOR_MAGENTA</STRONG>     5     max,0,max
+             yellow    <STRONG>COLOR_YELLOW</STRONG>      6     max,max,0
+             white     <STRONG>COLOR_WHITE</STRONG>       7     max,max,max
+       It is important to not confuse the two sets of color capa-
+       bilities; otherwise red/blue will be interchanged  on  the
+       display.
+
        On  an  HP-like terminal, use <STRONG>scp</STRONG> with a color-pair number
        parameter to set which color pair is current.
 
        ors  are  enabled.  The correspondence with the attributes
        understood by <STRONG>curses</STRONG> is as follows:
 
+
                       <STRONG>Attribute</STRONG>      <STRONG>Bit</STRONG>   <STRONG>Decimal</STRONG>
                       A_STANDOUT     0     1
                       A_UNDERLINE    1     2
        A capability can be canceled by placing <STRONG>xx@</STRONG> to the left of
        the  use  reference that imports it, where <EM>xx</EM> is the capa-
        bility.  For example, the entry
+
                    2621-nl, smkx@, rmkx@, use=2621,
 
        defines a 2621-nl that does not  have  the  <STRONG>smkx</STRONG>  or  <STRONG>rmkx</STRONG>
 
    <STRONG>Pitfalls</STRONG> <STRONG>of</STRONG> <STRONG>Long</STRONG> <STRONG>Entries</STRONG>
        Long  terminfo  entries  are  unlikely to be a problem; to
-       date, no entry has even approached terminfo's  4K  string-
-       table  maximum.   Unfortunately,  the termcap translations
-       are much more  strictly  limited  (to  1K),  thus  termcap
-       translations  of long terminfo entries can cause problems.
-
-       The man pages for 4.3BSD and older versions  of  tgetent()
-       instruct  the user to allocate a 1K buffer for the termcap
-       entry.  The entry  gets  null-terminated  by  the  termcap
-       library, so that makes the maximum safe length for a term-
-       cap entry 1k-1 (1023) bytes.  Depending on what the appli-
-       cation  and the termcap library being used does, and where
-       in the termcap file the terminal type  that  tgetent()  is
-       searching for is, several bad things can happen.
+       date, no entry has even  approached  terminfo's  4096-byte
+       string-table maximum.  Unfortunately, the termcap transla-
+       tions are much more strictly limited (to 1023 bytes), thus
+       termcap  translations  of  long terminfo entries can cause
+       problems.
+
+       The man pages for 4.3BSD and older versions  of  <STRONG>tgetent()</STRONG>
+       instruct  the  user to allocate a 1024-byte buffer for the
+       termcap entry.  The  entry  gets  null-terminated  by  the
+       termcap library, so that makes the maximum safe length for
+       a termcap entry 1k-1 (1023) bytes.  Depending on what  the
+       application  and  the termcap library being used does, and
+       where in the termcap file the terminal type that <STRONG>tgetent()</STRONG>
+       is searching for is, several bad things can happen.
 
        Some  termcap libraries print a warning message or exit if
        they find an entry that's longer than 1023  bytes;  others
-       don't;  others  truncate  the entries to 1023 bytes.  Some
+       do  not;  others truncate the entries to 1023 bytes.  Some
        application programs allocate more than the recommended 1K
-       for the termcap entry; others don't.
+       for the termcap entry; others do not.
 
        Each termcap entry has two important sizes associated with
        it: before "tc" expansion, and after "tc" expansion.  "tc"
        is  the  capability that tacks on another termcap entry to
        the end of the current one, to add  on  its  capabilities.
-       If  a  termcap entry doesn't use the "tc" capability, then
+       If  a termcap entry does not use the "tc" capability, then
        of course the two lengths are the same.
 
        The "before tc expansion" length  is  the  most  important
        one,  because it affects more than just users of that par-
        ticular terminal.  This is the length of the entry  as  it
        exists in /etc/termcap, minus the backslash-newline pairs,
-       which tgetent() strips out while reading it.  Some termcap
+       which <STRONG>tgetent()</STRONG> strips out while reading it.  Some termcap
        libraries  strip  off  the final newline, too (GNU termcap
        does not).  Now suppose:
 
             matter  what  its length, to see if it's the entry it
             wants,
 
-       *    and tgetent() is searching for a terminal  type  that
+       *    and <STRONG>tgetent()</STRONG> is searching for a terminal  type  that
             either is the long entry, appears in the termcap file
-            after the long entry, or doesn't appear in  the  file
-            at  all  (so  that  tgetent() has to search the whole
+            after the long entry, or does not appear in the  file
+            at  all  (so  that  <STRONG>tgetent()</STRONG> has to search the whole
             termcap file).
 
-       Then tgetent() will overwrite memory, perhaps  its  stack,
+       Then <STRONG>tgetent()</STRONG> will overwrite memory, perhaps  its  stack,
        and  probably core dump the program.  Programs like telnet
        are particularly vulnerable;  modern  telnets  pass  along
        values  like the terminal type automatically.  The results
 
        The "after tc expansion" length will have a similar effect
        to the above, but only for people who actually set TERM to
-       that  terminal type, since tgetent() only does "tc" expan-
+       that  terminal type, since <STRONG>tgetent()</STRONG> only does "tc" expan-
        sion once it's found the terminal type it was looking for,
        not while searching.
 
 </PRE>
 <H2>EXTENSIONS</H2><PRE>
        Some  SVr4  <STRONG>curses</STRONG>  implementations,  and  all previous to
-       SVr4, don't interpret the %A and %O operators in parameter
-       strings.
+       SVr4, do not interpret the %A and %O operators in  parame-
+       ter strings.
 
        SVr4/XPG4  do  not  specify whether <STRONG>msgr</STRONG> licenses movement
        while in an alternate-character-set mode (such modes  may,
-       among other things, map CR and NL to characters that don't
-       trigger  local  motions).   The   <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>   implementation
+       among  other  things,  map CR and NL to characters that do
+       not trigger local motions).   The  <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  implementation
        ignores  <STRONG>msgr</STRONG>  in <STRONG>ALTCHARSET</STRONG> mode.  This raises the possi-
        bility that an XPG4  implementation  making  the  opposite
        interpretation  may need terminfo entries made for <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>
                                 descriptions
 
 
-
 </PRE>
 <H2>SEE ALSO</H2><PRE>
-       <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="printf.3S.html">printf(3S)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="term.5.html">term(5)</A></STRONG>.
+       <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="printf.3S.html">printf(3S)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="term.5.html">term(5)</A></STRONG>.
 
 
 </PRE>
 
 
 
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+                                                            <STRONG><A HREF="TERMINFO.5.html">TERMINFO(5)</A></STRONG>
 </PRE>
 <HR>
 <ADDRESS>