ncurses 5.7 - patch 20101002
[ncurses.git] / man / term.5
index 19af62a350ed48c68b3f45fcee6c9e38f88b353d..608f0d0f080f56306a0a3f3a28edfac88730ff15 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 .\"***************************************************************************
-.\" Copyright (c) 1998-2004,2006 Free Software Foundation, Inc.              *
+.\" Copyright (c) 1998-2006,2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.              *
 .\"                                                                          *
 .\" Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a  *
 .\" copy of this software and associated documentation files (the            *
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@
 .\" authorization.                                                           *
 .\"***************************************************************************
 .\"
-.\" $Id: term.5,v 1.19 2006/12/24 18:12:38 tom Exp $
+.\" $Id: term.5,v 1.20 2010/07/31 16:13:27 tom Exp $
 .TH term 5
 .ds n 5
 .ds d @TERMINFO@
@@ -109,7 +109,7 @@ Short integers are stored in two 8-bit bytes.
 The first byte contains the least significant 8 bits of the value,
 and the second byte contains the most significant 8 bits.
 (Thus, the value represented is 256*second+first.)
-The value -1 is represented by the two bytes 0377, 0377; other negative
+The value \-1 is represented by the two bytes 0377, 0377; other negative
 values are illegal. This value generally
 means that the corresponding capability is missing from this terminal.
 Note that this format corresponds to the hardware of the \s-1VAX\s+1
@@ -130,7 +130,7 @@ The capabilities are in the same order as the file <term.h>.
 Between the boolean section and the number section,
 a null byte will be inserted, if necessary,
 to ensure that the number section begins on an even byte (this is a
-relic of the PDP-11's word-addressed architecture, originally
+relic of the PDP\-11's word-addressed architecture, originally
 designed in to avoid IOT traps induced by addressing a word on an
 odd byte boundary).
 All short integers are aligned on a short word boundary.
@@ -138,11 +138,11 @@ All short integers are aligned on a short word boundary.
 The numbers section is similar to the flags section.
 Each capability takes up two bytes,
 and is stored as a little-endian short integer.
-If the value represented is -1, the capability is taken to be missing.
+If the value represented is \-1, the capability is taken to be missing.
 .PP
 The strings section is also similar.
 Each capability is stored as a short integer, in the format above.
-A value of -1 means the capability is missing.
+A value of \-1 means the capability is missing.
 Otherwise, the value is taken as an offset from the beginning
 of the string table.
 Special characters in ^X or \ec notation are stored in their
@@ -217,14 +217,14 @@ of boolean, number, and string capabilities.
 Despite the consistent use of little-endian for numbers and the otherwise
 self-describing format, it is not wise to count on portability of binary
 terminfo entries between commercial UNIX versions.  The problem is that there
-are at least three versions of terminfo (under HP-UX, AIX, and OSF/1) which
+are at least three versions of terminfo (under HP\-UX, AIX, and OSF/1) which
 diverged from System V terminfo after SVr1, and have added extension
 capabilities to the string table that (in the binary format) collide with
 System V and XSI Curses extensions.  See \fBterminfo\fR(\*n) for detailed
 discussion of terminfo source compatibility issues.
 .SH EXAMPLE
 As an example, here is a hex dump of the description for the Lear-Siegler
-ADM-3, a popular though rather stupid early terminal:
+ADM\-3, a popular though rather stupid early terminal:
 .nf
 .sp
 adm3a|lsi adm3a,