ncurses 5.7 - patch 20090906
[ncurses.git] / man / terminfo.tail
index fa9a90d8665498d4c1bf39664ca9d14874712d59..d06d3a963a63105363eaf1f1bd62cefff7e1aa4a 100644 (file)
@@ -1,11 +1,11 @@
-.\" $Id: terminfo.tail,v 1.44 2006/04/01 22:47:01 tom Exp $
+.\" $Id: terminfo.tail,v 1.49 2008/02/16 20:57:43 tom Exp $
 .\" Beginning of terminfo.tail file
 .\" This file is part of ncurses.
 .\" See "terminfo.head" for copyright.
 .ps +1
 .\" Beginning of terminfo.tail file
 .\" This file is part of ncurses.
 .\" See "terminfo.head" for copyright.
 .ps +1
-..
+.
 .SS A Sample Entry
 .SS A Sample Entry
-..
+.
 The following entry, describing an ANSI-standard terminal, is representative
 of what a \fBterminfo\fR entry for a modern terminal typically looks like.
 .PP
 The following entry, describing an ANSI-standard terminal, is representative
 of what a \fBterminfo\fR entry for a modern terminal typically looks like.
 .PP
@@ -297,7 +297,7 @@ while the Lear Siegler \s-1ADM-3\s0 is described as
 Cursor addressing and other strings requiring parameters
 in the terminal are described by a
 parameterized string capability, with
 Cursor addressing and other strings requiring parameters
 in the terminal are described by a
 parameterized string capability, with
-.IR printf (3S)
+.IR printf (3)
 like escapes \fB%x\fR in it.
 For example, to address the cursor, the
 .B cup
 like escapes \fB%x\fR in it.
 For example, to address the cursor, the
 .B cup
@@ -325,7 +325,9 @@ The \fB%\fR encodings have the following meanings:
 outputs `%'
 .TP
 %\fI[[\fP:\fI]flags][width[.precision]][\fPdoxXs\fI]\fP
 outputs `%'
 .TP
 %\fI[[\fP:\fI]flags][width[.precision]][\fPdoxXs\fI]\fP
-as in \fBprintf\fP, flags are [-+#] and space
+as in \fBprintf\fP, flags are [-+#] and space.
+Use a `:' to allow the next character to be a `-' flag,
+avoiding interpreting "%-" as an operator.
 .TP
 %c
 print pop() like %c in \fBprintf\fP
 .TP
 %c
 print pop() like %c in \fBprintf\fP
@@ -395,7 +397,7 @@ It is possible to form else-if's a la Algol 68:
 .IP
 where c\di\u are conditions, b\di\u are bodies.
 .IP
 .IP
 where c\di\u are conditions, b\di\u are bodies.
 .IP
-Use the \fB-f\fP option of \fBtic\fP or \fBinfocmp\fP to see
+Use the \fB-f\fP option of \fBtic\fP or \fB@INFOCMP@\fP to see
 the structure of if-the-else's.
 Some strings, e.g., \fBsgr\fP can be very complicated when written
 on one line.
 the structure of if-the-else's.
 Some strings, e.g., \fBsgr\fP can be very complicated when written
 on one line.
@@ -993,7 +995,7 @@ with the rest of the terminfo description.
 They are normally sent to the terminal, by the
 .I init
 option of the
 They are normally sent to the terminal, by the
 .I init
 option of the
-.IR tput
+.IR @TPUT@
 program, each time the user logs in.
 They will be printed in the following order:
 .RS
 program, each time the user logs in.
 They will be printed in the following order:
 .RS
@@ -1578,7 +1580,7 @@ and the application has only allocated a 1k buffer,
 *
 and the termcap library (like the one in BSD/OS 1.1 and GNU) reads
 the whole entry into the buffer, no matter what its length, to see
 *
 and the termcap library (like the one in BSD/OS 1.1 and GNU) reads
 the whole entry into the buffer, no matter what its length, to see
-if it's the entry it wants,
+if it is the entry it wants,
 .TP 5
 *
 and \fBtgetent()\fP is searching for a terminal type that either is the
 .TP 5
 *
 and \fBtgetent()\fP is searching for a terminal type that either is the
@@ -1599,19 +1601,19 @@ here but will return incorrect data for the terminal.
 .PP
 The "after tc expansion" length will have a similar effect to the
 above, but only for people who actually set TERM to that terminal
 .PP
 The "after tc expansion" length will have a similar effect to the
 above, but only for people who actually set TERM to that terminal
-type, since \fBtgetent()\fP only does "tc" expansion once it's found the
+type, since \fBtgetent()\fP only does "tc" expansion once it is found the
 terminal type it was looking for, not while searching.
 .PP
 In summary, a termcap entry that is longer than 1023 bytes can cause,
 on various combinations of termcap libraries and applications, a core
 dump, warnings, or incorrect operation.
 terminal type it was looking for, not while searching.
 .PP
 In summary, a termcap entry that is longer than 1023 bytes can cause,
 on various combinations of termcap libraries and applications, a core
 dump, warnings, or incorrect operation.
-If it's too long even before
+If it is too long even before
 "tc" expansion, it will have this effect even for users of some other
 terminal types and users whose TERM variable does not have a termcap
 entry.
 .PP
 When in -C (translate to termcap) mode, the \fBncurses\fR implementation of
 "tc" expansion, it will have this effect even for users of some other
 terminal types and users whose TERM variable does not have a termcap
 entry.
 .PP
 When in -C (translate to termcap) mode, the \fBncurses\fR implementation of
-\fBtic\fR(1) issues warning messages when the pre-tc length of a termcap
+\fB@TIC@\fR(1M) issues warning messages when the pre-tc length of a termcap
 translation is too long.
 The -c (check) option also checks resolved (after tc
 expansion) lengths.
 translation is too long.
 The -c (check) option also checks resolved (after tc
 expansion) lengths.
@@ -1688,7 +1690,7 @@ files containing terminal descriptions
 \fB@TIC@\fR(1M),
 \fB@INFOCMP@\fR(1M),
 \fBcurses\fR(3X),
 \fB@TIC@\fR(1M),
 \fB@INFOCMP@\fR(1M),
 \fBcurses\fR(3X),
-\fBprintf\fR(3S),
+\fBprintf\fR(3),
 \fBterm\fR(\*n).
 .SH AUTHORS
 Zeyd M. Ben-Halim, Eric S. Raymond, Thomas E. Dickey.
 \fBterm\fR(\*n).
 .SH AUTHORS
 Zeyd M. Ben-Halim, Eric S. Raymond, Thomas E. Dickey.