ncurses 6.1 - patch 20190615
authorThomas E. Dickey <dickey@invisible-island.net>
Sun, 16 Jun 2019 00:13:35 +0000 (00:13 +0000)
committerThomas E. Dickey <dickey@invisible-island.net>
Sun, 16 Jun 2019 00:13:35 +0000 (00:13 +0000)
+ expand the portability section of the man/tabs.1 manual page.
+ regenerate HTML manpages.

31 files changed:
NEWS
VERSION
dist.mk
doc/html/ada/funcs/T.htm
doc/html/man/adacurses6-config.1.html
doc/html/man/captoinfo.1m.html
doc/html/man/clear.1.html
doc/html/man/curs_variables.3x.html
doc/html/man/form.3x.html
doc/html/man/infocmp.1m.html
doc/html/man/infotocap.1m.html
doc/html/man/menu.3x.html
doc/html/man/menu_spacing.3x.html
doc/html/man/ncurses.3x.html
doc/html/man/ncurses6-config.1.html
doc/html/man/panel.3x.html
doc/html/man/tabs.1.html
doc/html/man/terminfo.5.html
doc/html/man/tic.1m.html
doc/html/man/toe.1m.html
doc/html/man/tput.1.html
doc/html/man/tset.1.html
doc/html/man/user_caps.5.html
man/tabs.1
package/debian-mingw/changelog
package/debian-mingw64/changelog
package/debian/changelog
package/mingw-ncurses.nsi
package/mingw-ncurses.spec
package/ncurses.spec
package/ncursest.spec

diff --git a/NEWS b/NEWS
index 66b3c9f8e09904b08ebfba6cb694e23ce330d726..023649d235a1c3ef10838794b1908e7f9fa83493 100644 (file)
--- a/NEWS
+++ b/NEWS
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@
 -- sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written        --
 -- authorization.                                                            --
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--- $Id: NEWS,v 1.3329 2019/06/09 20:07:36 tom Exp $
+-- $Id: NEWS,v 1.3332 2019/06/15 23:39:53 tom Exp $
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 This is a log of changes that ncurses has gone through since Zeyd started
@@ -45,6 +45,10 @@ See the AUTHORS file for the corresponding full names.
 Changes through 1.9.9e did not credit all contributions;
 it is not possible to add this information.
 
+20190615
+       + expand the portability section of the man/tabs.1 manual page.
+       + regenerate HTML manpages.
+
 20190609
        + add mintty, mintty-direct (adapted from patch by Thomas Wolff).
          Some of the suggested user-defined capabilities are commented-out,
diff --git a/VERSION b/VERSION
index 59a811fa1040d65c43bc5789f80e4905bc408da4..7068aa5b389c80b043252d8abdfcd443068870a4 100644 (file)
--- a/VERSION
+++ b/VERSION
@@ -1 +1 @@
-5:0:10 6.1     20190609
+5:0:10 6.1     20190615
diff --git a/dist.mk b/dist.mk
index 9ec52a51d2787264f484ec5507dacdab3a7f0fe9..5878c74d7d2b081a4e05cad4c84c872699fb8538 100644 (file)
--- a/dist.mk
+++ b/dist.mk
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@
 # use or other dealings in this Software without prior written               #
 # authorization.                                                             #
 ##############################################################################
-# $Id: dist.mk,v 1.1287 2019/06/09 20:06:01 tom Exp $
+# $Id: dist.mk,v 1.1288 2019/06/15 12:46:35 tom Exp $
 # Makefile for creating ncurses distributions.
 #
 # This only needs to be used directly as a makefile by developers, but
@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ SHELL = /bin/sh
 # These define the major/minor/patch versions of ncurses.
 NCURSES_MAJOR = 6
 NCURSES_MINOR = 1
-NCURSES_PATCH = 20190609
+NCURSES_PATCH = 20190615
 
 # We don't append the patch to the version, since this only applies to releases
 VERSION = $(NCURSES_MAJOR).$(NCURSES_MINOR)
index 782d38b7983dd888abfd9ac49b48482b923575f8..098d0da7e912fc375578b8c7b2dbf4325180fdb0 100644 (file)
@@ -20,8 +20,8 @@
 <LI><A HREF="../terminal_interface-curses-termcap__adb.htm#ref_89_16" TARGET="main">tgetnum</A>
 <LI><A HREF="../terminal_interface-curses-termcap__adb.htm#ref_108_16" TARGET="main">tgetstr -  terminal_interface-curses-termcap.adb:108</A>
 <LI><A HREF="../terminal_interface-curses-termcap__adb.htm#ref_129_16" TARGET="main">tgetstr -  terminal_interface-curses-termcap.adb:129</A>
-<LI><A HREF="../terminal_interface-curses-termcap__adb.htm#ref_151_16" TARGET="main">tgoto</A>
 <LI><A HREF="../terminal_interface-curses-termcap__ads.htm#ref_53_13" TARGET="main">TGoto</A>
+<LI><A HREF="../terminal_interface-curses-termcap__adb.htm#ref_151_16" TARGET="main">tgoto</A>
 <LI><A HREF="../terminal_interface-curses-terminfo__adb.htm#ref_69_16" TARGET="main">tigetflag</A>
 <LI><A HREF="../terminal_interface-curses-terminfo__adb.htm#ref_87_16" TARGET="main">tigetstr -  terminal_interface-curses-terminfo.adb:87</A>
 <LI><A HREF="../terminal_interface-curses-terminfo__adb.htm#ref_108_16" TARGET="main">tigetstr -  terminal_interface-curses-terminfo.adb:108</A>
index cf21a4ef1187ef3d11e3726c5c935b1919ed6039..88b9e229fd234338fc91f6a13986f88dfb50c6a2 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 
index 1b764725fceec347c9b6ae719489aa320dd2dfd0..7748893cd4d6f51bad5ca4732003b1e89fb64a04 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-AUTHOR">AUTHOR</a></H2><PRE>
index eb1ccb053b367092574fe800d29f1b2d0d5a8f0f..41a525b7322dc12a8e4e98d6b34a412ac6956680 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="tput.1.html">tput(1)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 
index 50a5fa07d46a70a9e41bba829f23e4c32dd7a224..afeca3b21e894698f094f0f5e3f225a305d9be0f 100644 (file)
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@
   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
   * authorization.                                                           *
   ****************************************************************************
-  * @Id: curs_variables.3x,v 1.12 2019/02/16 23:43:23 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: curs_variables.3x,v 1.13 2019/06/01 22:51:21 tom Exp @
 -->
 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
 <HTML>
            <STRONG><A HREF="addch.3x.html">ch(3x)</A></STRONG> as well as the physical screen with <STRONG><A HREF="curs_terminfo.3x.html">mvcur(3x)</A></STRONG>.
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   This implementation uses the current value of <STRONG>TABSIZE</STRONG> only for  up-
-           dating  the  virtual  screen.   It  uses the terminal description's
-           <STRONG>init_tabs</STRONG> capability  for  computing  tab  stops  on  the  physical
-           screen.
+           dating  the  virtual screen.  It uses the terminal description's <STRONG>it</STRONG>
+           (<STRONG>init_tabs</STRONG>) capability for computing hardware tabs (i.e., tab stops
+           on the physical screen).
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Other  implementations  differ.  For instance, NetBSD curses allows
            <STRONG>TABSIZE</STRONG> to be set through an environment variable.  This  implemen-
            tation does not.
 
+           NetBSD curses does not support hardware tabs; it uses the <STRONG>init_tabs</STRONG>
+           capability and the <STRONG>TABSIZE</STRONG> variable only for updating  the  virtual
+           screen.
+
        <STRONG>ESCDELAY</STRONG> is an extension in AIX curses:
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   In AIX, the units for <STRONG>ESCDELAY</STRONG> are <EM>fifths</EM> of a millisecond.
index 6e4bb87a12462c6e71897fc927a493189c679e01..c5cc022f9ec9e314f4796ed6533497b66e4c78c3 100644 (file)
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>  and  related  pages  whose names begin "form_" for detailed
        descriptions of the entry points.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 
index 20ee73ec5c9417867b1d9acb31a9de6d14e7f6dd..855847269f6489db65e26f6ddfe70cdd89a25f0f 100644 (file)
 
        https://invisible-island.net/ncurses/tctest.html
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-AUTHOR">AUTHOR</a></H2><PRE>
index 7e647d8da84a9cfe70e135c9325364144d223b69..0f04aa30e813ea506e065c32f14b42556a24e0ea 100644 (file)
@@ -85,7 +85,7 @@
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-AUTHOR">AUTHOR</a></H2><PRE>
index 30cce931b5d62858a005fc766eec797a23eec5dc..7bc3f8fb15498eb8704c4fc6ce4e0c8974aea3cd 100644 (file)
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>  and  related  pages  whose names begin "menu_" for detailed
        descriptions of the entry points.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 
index 9865a5e8942ad56ae632db79ef46f77a510e04db..13e64d8a1df2bd32878224fa27d8966c324a377c 100644 (file)
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 <!-- 
   * t
   ****************************************************************************
-  * Copyright (c) 1998-2015,2018 Free Software Foundation, Inc.              *
+  * Copyright (c) 1998-2018,2019 Free Software Foundation, Inc.              *
   *                                                                          *
   * Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a  *
   * copy of this software and associated documentation files (the            *
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@
   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
   * authorization.                                                           *
   ****************************************************************************
-  * @Id: menu_spacing.3x,v 1.14 2018/07/28 22:20:54 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: menu_spacing.3x,v 1.15 2019/06/01 22:33:45 tom Exp @
 -->
 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
 <HTML>
@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@
        lines  between item rows, these lines will contain the pad character in
        the appropriate positions.  The <STRONG>spc_columns</STRONG> parameter controls the num-
        ber  of  blanks  between  columns of items.  It must not be larger than
-       TABSIZE.  A value of 0 for all the spacing values resets  them  to  the
+       <STRONG>TABSIZE</STRONG>.  A value of 0 for all the spacing values resets  them  to  the
        default, which is 1 for all of them.
        The  function  <STRONG>menu_spacing</STRONG>  passes back the spacing info for the menu.
        If a pointer is NULL, this specific info is simply not returned.
index 5a8d917ad2ee4d4b55788acf8f585b47373337c4..26f8865c7650363a193ceaffae6507a07d553187 100644 (file)
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@
        method of updating  character  screens  with  reasonable  optimization.
        This  implementation  is  "new  curses"  (ncurses)  and is the approved
        replacement for 4.4BSD classic curses,  which  has  been  discontinued.
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
        The  <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  library emulates the curses library of System V Release 4
        UNIX, and XPG4 (X/Open Portability Guide) curses  (also  known  as  XSI
index 7345d2bf3bc37dd6eb39c9ea0e22673ca36a694b..beb36ba714149b34b0ccb7a782c013ab13994f3e 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 
index 0a199d109bc5aadfc12ead49e4e67555149c0cf8..1a5abb260e8e7d0fac207792087f48053af1d1e7 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="curs_variables.3x.html">curs_variables(3x)</A></STRONG>,
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-AUTHOR">AUTHOR</a></H2><PRE>
index bdd8f6acdedf4135f079e4fb0766e6023d677743..b921bf8570da9e2aabe4da1b60b83da7bc99b99b 100644 (file)
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@
   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
   * authorization.                                                           *
   ****************************************************************************
-  * @Id: tabs.1,v 1.20 2019/02/16 23:56:38 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: tabs.1,v 1.25 2019/06/15 23:08:12 tom Exp @
 -->
 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
 <HTML>
        tions running in the terminal, if at all.  Curses and other full-screen
        applications  may  use  hardware tabs in optimizing their output to the
        terminal.  If the hardware tabstops differ from the information in  the
-       terminal database, the result is unpredictable.
+       terminal  database, the result is unpredictable.  Before running curses
+       programs, you should either reset tab-stops to the standard interval
+
+           tabs -8
+
+       or use the <STRONG>reset</STRONG> program, since the normal initialization sequences  do
+       not ensure that tab-stops are reset.
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-OPTIONS">OPTIONS</a></H2><PRE>
        (POSIX.1-2008) describes a <STRONG>tabs</STRONG> utility.  However
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   This  standard describes a <STRONG>+m</STRONG> option, to set a terminal's left-mar-
-           gin.  Very few of the entries in the terminal database provide this
-           capability.
+           gin.  Very few of the entries in the terminal database provide  the
+           <STRONG>smgl</STRONG>  (<STRONG>set_left_margin</STRONG>)  or <STRONG>smglp</STRONG> (<STRONG>set_left_margin_parm</STRONG>) capability
+           needed to support the feature.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   There  is no counterpart in X/Open Curses Issue 7 for this utility,
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   There is no counterpart in X/Open Curses Issue 7 for this  utility,
            unlike <STRONG>tput(1)</STRONG>.
 
-       The <STRONG>-d</STRONG> (debug) and <STRONG>-n</STRONG> (no-op) options are extensions  not  provided  by
+       The  <STRONG>-d</STRONG>  (debug)  and <STRONG>-n</STRONG> (no-op) options are extensions not provided by
        other implementations.
 
-       Documentation for other implementations states that there is a limit on
-       the number of tab stops.  While some terminals may not accept an  arbi-
-       trary  number of tab stops, this implementation will attempt to set tab
-       stops up to the right margin of the screen, if the given  list  happens
-       to be that long.
+       A <STRONG>tabs</STRONG> utility appeared in PWB/Unix 1.0 (1977), and thereafter in  3BSD
+       (1979).  It supported a single "-n" option (to cause the first tab stop
+       to be set on the left margin).  That option is not documented by POSIX.
+       Initially, <STRONG>tabs</STRONG> used built-in tables rather than the terminal database,
+       to support a half-dozen terminal types.  It also had built-in logic  to
+       support  the left-margin, as well as a feature for copying the tab set-
+       tings from a file.
+
+       Later versions of Unix, e.g., SVr4,  added  support  for  the  terminal
+       database,  but  kept the tables, as a fallback.  In an earlier develop-
+       ment effort, the tab-stop initialization provided by  <STRONG>tset</STRONG>  (1982)  and
+       incorporated into <STRONG>tput</STRONG> uses the terminal database,
+
+       POSIX  documents  no  limits on the number of tab stops.  Documentation
+       for other implementations states that there is a limit on the number of
+       tab  stops.  While some terminals may not accept an arbitrary number of
+       tab stops, this implementation will attempt to set tab stops up to  the
+       right margin of the screen, if the given list happens to be that long.
+
+       The  <EM>Rationale</EM> section of the POSIX documentation goes into some detail
+       about the ways the committee considered redesigning the <STRONG>tabs</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>tput</STRONG>
+       utilities, without proposing an improved solution.  It comments that
+
+            no  known  historical  version  of tabs supports the capability of
+            setting arbitrary tab stops.
+
+       However, the <EM>Explicit</EM> <EM>Lists</EM> described in this manual page  were  imple-
+       mented  in  PWB/Unix.  Those provide the capability of setting abitrary
+       tab stops.
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="tset.1.html">tset(1)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 
index 09ba56ca2c8409dd32814b42de8ad6a427d61ae0..5d128260bdab4cfaa8b0a63f876e33e4f22107ab 100644 (file)
@@ -33,7 +33,7 @@
   ****************************************************************************
   * @Id: terminfo.head,v 1.35 2018/07/28 22:29:09 tom Exp @
   * Head of terminfo man page ends here
-  * @Id: terminfo.tail,v 1.90 2019/01/20 20:21:46 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: terminfo.tail,v 1.93 2019/06/01 22:32:15 tom Exp @
   * Beginning of terminfo.tail file
   * This file is part of ncurses.
   * See "terminfo.head" for copyright.
@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@
        <EM>Terminfo</EM> describes terminals by giving a set of capabilities which they
        have, by specifying how to perform screen operations, and by specifying
        padding  requirements  and  initialization  sequences.   This describes
-       <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Terminfo-Entry-Syntax">Terminfo Entry Syntax</a></H3><PRE>
        applies to storage scope terminals, such as TEKTRONIX 4010  series,  as
        well  as  hard copy and APL terminals.)  If there is a code to move the
        cursor to the left edge of the current row, give this as <STRONG>cr</STRONG>.  (Normally
-       this  will  be carriage return, control M.)  If there is a code to pro-
+       this  will  be carriage return, control/M.)  If there is a code to pro-
        duce an audible signal (bell, beep, etc) give this as <STRONG>bel</STRONG>.
 
        If there is a code to move the cursor one position to the left (such as
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Tabs-and-Initialization">Tabs and Initialization</a></H3><PRE>
-       If  the  terminal has hardware tabs, the command to advance to the next
-       tab stop can be given as <STRONG>ht</STRONG> (usually control I).  A "back-tab"  command
-       which moves leftward to the preceding tab stop can be given as <STRONG>cbt</STRONG>.  By
-       convention, if the teletype modes indicate that tabs are being expanded
-       by the computer rather than being sent to the terminal, programs should
-       not use <STRONG>ht</STRONG> or <STRONG>cbt</STRONG> even if they are present, since the user may not have
-       the  tab  stops  properly set.  If the terminal has hardware tabs which
-       are initially set every <EM>n</EM> spaces when the terminal is powered  up,  the
-       numeric  parameter  <STRONG>it</STRONG>  is given, showing the number of spaces the tabs
-       are set to.  This is normally used by the  <STRONG>tset</STRONG>  command  to  determine
-       whether  to set the mode for hardware tab expansion, and whether to set
-       the tab stops.  If the terminal has tab stops that can be saved in non-
-       volatile  memory,  the  terminfo  description  can assume that they are
-       properly set.
-
-       Other capabilities include <STRONG>is1</STRONG>, <STRONG>is2</STRONG>, and  <STRONG>is3</STRONG>,  initialization  strings
-       for  the  terminal, <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>, the path name of a program to be run to ini-
-       tialize the terminal, and <STRONG>if</STRONG>, the name of a file containing  long  ini-
-       tialization  strings.   These  strings are expected to set the terminal
-       into modes consistent with the rest of the terminfo description.   They
-       are  normally sent to the terminal, by the <EM>init</EM> option of the <STRONG>tput</STRONG> pro-
-       gram, each time the user logs in.  They will be printed in the  follow-
-       ing order:
+       A few capabilities are used only for tabs:
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If  the  terminal  has hardware tabs, the command to advance to the
+           next tab stop can be given as <STRONG>ht</STRONG> (usually control/I).
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   A "back-tab" command which moves leftward to the preceding tab stop
+           can be given as <STRONG>cbt</STRONG>.
+
+           By  convention,  if the teletype modes indicate that tabs are being
+           expanded by the computer rather than being sent  to  the  terminal,
+           programs  should  not use <STRONG>ht</STRONG> or <STRONG>cbt</STRONG> even if they are present, since
+           the user may not have the tab stops properly set.
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If the terminal has hardware tabs which are initially set  every  <EM>n</EM>
+           spaces when the terminal is powered up, the numeric parameter <STRONG>it</STRONG> is
+           given, showing the number of spaces the tabs are set to.
+
+           The <STRONG>it</STRONG> capability is normally used by the <STRONG>tset</STRONG> command to determine
+           whether  to set the mode for hardware tab expansion, and whether to
+           set the tab stops.  If the terminal has tab stops that can be saved
+           in  non-volatile  memory,  the terminfo description can assume that
+           they are properly set.
+
+       Other capabilities include
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>is1</STRONG>, <STRONG>is2</STRONG>, and <STRONG>is3</STRONG>, initialization strings for the terminal,
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>, the path name of a program to be run to initialize the  ter-
+           minal,
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and <STRONG>if</STRONG>, the name of a file containing long initialization strings.
+
+       These  strings  are  expected to set the terminal into modes consistent
+       with the rest of the terminfo description.  They are normally  sent  to
+       the  terminal,  by  the  <EM>init</EM> option of the <STRONG>tput</STRONG> program, each time the
+       user logs in.  They will be printed in the following order:
 
               run the program
                      <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>
               and finally
                      output <STRONG>is3</STRONG>.
 
-       Most  initialization  is  done with <STRONG>is2</STRONG>.  Special terminal modes can be
-       set up without duplicating strings by putting the common  sequences  in
+       Most initialization is done with <STRONG>is2</STRONG>.  Special terminal  modes  can  be
+       set  up  without duplicating strings by putting the common sequences in
        <STRONG>is2</STRONG> and special cases in <STRONG>is1</STRONG> and <STRONG>is3</STRONG>.
 
-       A  set  of  sequences  that  does a harder reset from a totally unknown
+       A set of sequences that does a harder  reset  from  a  totally  unknown
        state can be given as <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs2</STRONG>, <STRONG>rf</STRONG> and <STRONG>rs3</STRONG>, analogous to <STRONG>is1</STRONG> <STRONG>,</STRONG> <STRONG>is2</STRONG> <STRONG>,</STRONG> <STRONG>if</STRONG>
-       and  <STRONG>is3</STRONG>  respectively.  These strings are output by the <STRONG>reset</STRONG> program,
-       which is used when the terminal gets into a wedged state.  Commands are
-       normally  placed  in  <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs2</STRONG> <STRONG>rs3</STRONG> and <STRONG>rf</STRONG> only if they produce annoying
-       effects on the screen and are not necessary when logging in.  For exam-
-       ple, the command to set the vt100 into 80-column mode would normally be
-       part of <STRONG>is2</STRONG>, but it causes an annoying glitch of the screen and is  not
-       normally  needed  since  the  terminal  is usually already in 80 column
-       mode.
-
-       The <STRONG>reset</STRONG> program writes strings including <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>,  etc.,  in  the  same
-       order  as  the  <EM>init</EM> program, using <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, etc., instead of <STRONG>is1</STRONG>, etc.  If
-       any of <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs2</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs3</STRONG>, or <STRONG>rf</STRONG> reset capability strings are  missing,  the
+       and <STRONG>is3</STRONG> respectively.  These strings are output by  the  <STRONG>reset</STRONG>  program
+       (an  alias of <STRONG>tset</STRONG>), which is used when the terminal gets into a wedged
+       state.  Commands are normally placed in <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs2</STRONG> <STRONG>rs3</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>rf</STRONG>  only  if
+       they  produce annoying effects on the screen and are not necessary when
+       logging in.  For example, the command to set the vt100  into  80-column
+       mode would normally be part of <STRONG>is2</STRONG>, but it causes an annoying glitch of
+       the screen and is not normally needed since  the  terminal  is  usually
+       already in 80 column mode.
+
+       The  <STRONG>reset</STRONG>  program  writes  strings including <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>, etc., in the same
+       order as the <EM>init</EM> program, using <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, etc., instead of  <STRONG>is1</STRONG>,  etc.   If
+       any  of  <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs2</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs3</STRONG>, or <STRONG>rf</STRONG> reset capability strings are missing, the
        <STRONG>reset</STRONG> program falls back upon the corresponding initialization capabil-
        ity string.
 
-       If there are commands to set and clear tab stops, they can be given  as
+       If  there are commands to set and clear tab stops, they can be given as
        <STRONG>tbc</STRONG> (clear all tab stops) and <STRONG>hts</STRONG> (set a tab stop in the current column
-       of every row).  If a more complex sequence is needed to  set  the  tabs
+       of  every  row).   If a more complex sequence is needed to set the tabs
        than can be described by this, the sequence can be placed in <STRONG>is2</STRONG> or <STRONG>if</STRONG>.
 
+       The <STRONG>tput</STRONG> <STRONG>reset</STRONG> command uses the same capability strings  as  the  <STRONG>reset</STRONG>
+       command,  although  the two programs (<STRONG>tput</STRONG> and <STRONG>reset</STRONG>) provide different
+       command-line options.
+
+       In practice, these terminfo capabilities are not often used in initial-
+       ization of tabs (though they are required for the <STRONG>tabs</STRONG> program):
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Almost all hardware terminals (at least those which supported tabs)
+           initialized those to every <EM>eight</EM> columns:
+
+           The only exception was the AT&amp;T 2300  series,  which  set  tabs  to
+           every <EM>five</EM> columns.
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   In  particular, developers of the hardware terminals which are com-
+           monly used as models for modern terminal emulators  provided  docu-
+           mentation demonstrating that <EM>eight</EM> columns were the standard.
+
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Because of this, the terminal initialization programs <STRONG>tput</STRONG> and <STRONG>tset</STRONG>
+           use  the  <STRONG>tbc</STRONG>  (<STRONG>clear_all_tabs</STRONG>)  and  <STRONG>hts</STRONG>  (<STRONG>set_tab</STRONG>)   capabilities
+           directly  only when the <STRONG>it</STRONG> (<STRONG>init_tabs</STRONG>) capability is set to a value
+           other than <EM>eight</EM>.
+
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Delays-and-Padding">Delays and Padding</a></H3><PRE>
-       Many  older  and slower terminals do not support either XON/XOFF or DTR
-       handshaking, including hard copy terminals and some very  archaic  CRTs
-       (including,  for example, DEC VT100s).  These may require padding char-
+       Many older and slower terminals do not support either XON/XOFF  or  DTR
+       handshaking,  including  hard copy terminals and some very archaic CRTs
+       (including, for example, DEC VT100s).  These may require padding  char-
        acters after certain cursor motions and screen changes.
 
        If the terminal uses xon/xoff handshaking for flow control (that is, it
-       automatically  emits  ^S  back  to  the host when its input buffers are
-       close to full), set <STRONG>xon</STRONG>.  This capability suppresses  the  emission  of
-       padding.   You can also set it for memory-mapped console devices effec-
-       tively that do not have a  speed  limit.   Padding  information  should
+       automatically emits ^S back to the host  when  its  input  buffers  are
+       close  to  full),  set <STRONG>xon</STRONG>.  This capability suppresses the emission of
+       padding.  You can also set it for memory-mapped console devices  effec-
+       tively  that  do  not  have  a speed limit.  Padding information should
        still be included so that routines can make better decisions about rel-
        ative costs, but actual pad characters will not be transmitted.
 
        If <STRONG>pb</STRONG> (padding baud rate) is given, padding is suppressed at baud rates
-       below  the  value  of  <STRONG>pb</STRONG>.  If the entry has no padding baud rate, then
+       below the value of <STRONG>pb</STRONG>.  If the entry has no  padding  baud  rate,  then
        whether padding is emitted or not is completely controlled by <STRONG>xon</STRONG>.
 
-       If the terminal requires other than a null (zero) character as  a  pad,
-       then  this  can  be  given as <STRONG>pad</STRONG>.  Only the first character of the <STRONG>pad</STRONG>
+       If  the  terminal requires other than a null (zero) character as a pad,
+       then this can be given as <STRONG>pad</STRONG>.  Only the first  character  of  the  <STRONG>pad</STRONG>
        string is used.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Status-Lines">Status Lines</a></H3><PRE>
-       Some terminals have an extra "status line" which is not  normally  used
+       Some  terminals  have an extra "status line" which is not normally used
        by software (and thus not counted in the terminal's <STRONG>lines</STRONG> capability).
 
-       The  simplest case is a status line which is cursor-addressable but not
+       The simplest case is a status line which is cursor-addressable but  not
        part of the main scrolling region on the screen; the Heathkit H19 has a
-       status  line  of  this  kind,  as  would a 24-line VT100 with a 23-line
+       status line of this kind, as would  a  24-line  VT100  with  a  23-line
        scrolling region set up on initialization.  This situation is indicated
        by the <STRONG>hs</STRONG> capability.
 
-       Some  terminals  with status lines need special sequences to access the
-       status line.  These may be expressed as a string with single  parameter
-       <STRONG>tsl</STRONG>  which takes the cursor to a given zero-origin column on the status
-       line.  The capability <STRONG>fsl</STRONG> must return to the main-screen  cursor  posi-
-       tions  before the last <STRONG>tsl</STRONG>.  You may need to embed the string values of
-       <STRONG>sc</STRONG> (save cursor) and <STRONG>rc</STRONG> (restore cursor) in <STRONG>tsl</STRONG> and <STRONG>fsl</STRONG>  to  accomplish
+       Some terminals with status lines need special sequences to  access  the
+       status  line.  These may be expressed as a string with single parameter
+       <STRONG>tsl</STRONG> which takes the cursor to a given zero-origin column on the  status
+       line.   The  capability <STRONG>fsl</STRONG> must return to the main-screen cursor posi-
+       tions before the last <STRONG>tsl</STRONG>.  You may need to embed the string values  of
+       <STRONG>sc</STRONG>  (save  cursor) and <STRONG>rc</STRONG> (restore cursor) in <STRONG>tsl</STRONG> and <STRONG>fsl</STRONG> to accomplish
        this.
 
-       The  status  line is normally assumed to be the same width as the width
-       of the terminal.  If this is  untrue,  you  can  specify  it  with  the
+       The status line is normally assumed to be the same width as  the  width
+       of  the  terminal.   If  this  is  untrue,  you can specify it with the
        numeric capability <STRONG>wsl</STRONG>.
 
        A command to erase or blank the status line may be specified as <STRONG>dsl</STRONG>.
 
-       The  boolean  capability  <STRONG>eslok</STRONG>  specifies that escape sequences, tabs,
+       The boolean capability <STRONG>eslok</STRONG> specifies  that  escape  sequences,  tabs,
        etc., work ordinarily in the status line.
 
-       The <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> implementation does not yet use any of these  capabilities.
+       The  <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> implementation does not yet use any of these capabilities.
        They are documented here in case they ever become important.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Line-Graphics">Line Graphics</a></H3><PRE>
-       Many  terminals have alternate character sets useful for forms-drawing.
+       Many terminals have alternate character sets useful for  forms-drawing.
        Terminfo and <STRONG>curses</STRONG> have built-in support for most of the drawing char-
-       acters  supported  by  the  VT100,  with  some characters from the AT&amp;T
-       4410v1 added.  This alternate character set may  be  specified  by  the
+       acters supported by the VT100,  with  some  characters  from  the  AT&amp;T
+       4410v1  added.   This  alternate  character set may be specified by the
        <STRONG>acsc</STRONG> capability.
 
          <STRONG>Glyph</STRONG>                       <STRONG>ACS</STRONG>            <STRONG>Ascii</STRONG>     <STRONG>acsc</STRONG>     <STRONG>acsc</STRONG>
          degree symbol               ACS_DEGREE     \         f        0x66
          plus/minus                  ACS_PLMINUS    #         g        0x67
          board of squares            ACS_BOARD      #         h        0x68
-
          lantern symbol              ACS_LANTERN    #         i        0x69
          lower right corner          ACS_LRCORNER   +         j        0x6a
          upper right corner          ACS_URCORNER   +         k        0x6b
 
        A few notes apply to the table itself:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   X/Open  Curses  incorrectly  states that the mapping for <EM>lantern</EM> is
-           uppercase "I" although Unix implementations use the  lowercase  "i"
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   X/Open Curses incorrectly states that the mapping  for  <EM>lantern</EM>  is
+           uppercase  "I"  although Unix implementations use the lowercase "i"
            mapping.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The  DEC  VT100  implemented graphics using the alternate character
-           set feature, temporarily switching <EM>modes</EM> and sending characters  in
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The DEC VT100 implemented graphics using  the  alternate  character
+           set  feature, temporarily switching <EM>modes</EM> and sending characters in
            the range 0x60 (96) to 0x7e (126) (the <STRONG>acsc</STRONG> <STRONG>Value</STRONG> column in the ta-
            ble).
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The AT&amp;T terminal added graphics characters outside that range.
 
-           Some of the characters within the range do  not  match  the  VT100;
-           presumably  they  were  used in the AT&amp;T terminal: <EM>board</EM> <EM>of</EM> <EM>squares</EM>
-           replaces the VT100 <EM>newline</EM> symbol, while  <EM>lantern</EM>  <EM>symbol</EM>  replaces
+           Some  of  the  characters  within the range do not match the VT100;
+           presumably they were used in the AT&amp;T terminal:  <EM>board</EM>  <EM>of</EM>  <EM>squares</EM>
+           replaces  the  VT100  <EM>newline</EM> symbol, while <EM>lantern</EM> <EM>symbol</EM> replaces
            the VT100 <EM>vertical</EM> <EM>tab</EM> symbol.  The other VT100 symbols for control
-           characters (<EM>horizontal</EM> <EM>tab</EM>, <EM>carriage</EM> <EM>return</EM> and <EM>line-feed</EM>) are  not
+           characters  (<EM>horizontal</EM> <EM>tab</EM>, <EM>carriage</EM> <EM>return</EM> and <EM>line-feed</EM>) are not
            (re)used in curses.
 
-       The  best  way to define a new device's graphics set is to add a column
-       to a copy of this table for your terminal, giving the  character  which
-       (when  emitted  between  <STRONG>smacs</STRONG>/<STRONG>rmacs</STRONG>  switches) will be rendered as the
+       The best way to define a new device's graphics set is to add  a  column
+       to  a  copy of this table for your terminal, giving the character which
+       (when emitted between <STRONG>smacs</STRONG>/<STRONG>rmacs</STRONG> switches) will  be  rendered  as  the
        corresponding graphic.  Then read off the VT100/your terminal character
        pairs right to left in sequence; these become the ACSC string.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Color-Handling">Color Handling</a></H3><PRE>
-       The  curses  library  functions <STRONG>init_pair</STRONG> and <STRONG>init_color</STRONG> manipulate the
-       <EM>color</EM>  <EM>pairs</EM>  and  <EM>color</EM>  <EM>values</EM>  discussed  in   this   section   (see
+       The curses library functions <STRONG>init_pair</STRONG> and  <STRONG>init_color</STRONG>  manipulate  the
+       <EM>color</EM>   <EM>pairs</EM>   and   <EM>color</EM>  <EM>values</EM>  discussed  in  this  section  (see
        <STRONG><A HREF="curs_color.3x.html">curs_color(3x)</A></STRONG> for details on these and related functions).
 
        Most color terminals are either "Tektronix-like" or "HP-like":
            is usually 8), and can set character-cell foreground and background
            characters independently, mixing them into <EM>N</EM> * <EM>N</EM> color-pairs.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On  HP-like  terminals,  the user must set each color pair up sepa-
-           rately (foreground and background are not independently  settable).
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On HP-like terminals, the user must set each color  pair  up  sepa-
+           rately  (foreground and background are not independently settable).
            Up to <EM>M</EM> color-pairs may be set up from 2*<EM>M</EM> different colors.  ANSI-
            compatible terminals are Tektronix-like.
 
        Some basic color capabilities are independent of the color method.  The
-       numeric  capabilities  <STRONG>colors</STRONG>  and <STRONG>pairs</STRONG> specify the maximum numbers of
-       colors and color-pairs that can be displayed  simultaneously.   The  <STRONG>op</STRONG>
+       numeric capabilities <STRONG>colors</STRONG> and <STRONG>pairs</STRONG> specify the  maximum  numbers  of
+       colors  and  color-pairs  that can be displayed simultaneously.  The <STRONG>op</STRONG>
        (original pair) string resets foreground and background colors to their
-       default values for the terminal.  The <STRONG>oc</STRONG> string resets  all  colors  or
-       color-pairs  to  their default values for the terminal.  Some terminals
+       default  values  for  the terminal.  The <STRONG>oc</STRONG> string resets all colors or
+       color-pairs to their default values for the terminal.   Some  terminals
        (including many PC terminal emulators) erase screen areas with the cur-
-       rent  background  color  rather  than  the power-up default background;
+       rent background color rather  than  the  power-up  default  background;
        these should have the boolean capability <STRONG>bce</STRONG>.
 
        While the curses library works with <EM>color</EM> <EM>pairs</EM> (reflecting the inabil-
-       ity  of  some  devices to set foreground and background colors indepen-
+       ity of some devices to set foreground and  background  colors  indepen-
        dently), there are separate capabilities for setting these features:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   To change the current foreground or  background  color  on  a  Tek-
-           tronix-type  terminal,  use  <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>  (set ANSI foreground) and <STRONG>setab</STRONG>
-           (set ANSI background) or <STRONG>setf</STRONG> (set foreground) and <STRONG>setb</STRONG> (set  back-
-           ground).   These  take  one  parameter, the color number.  The SVr4
-           documentation describes only <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG>; the XPG4 draft says  that
-           "If  the  terminal supports ANSI escape sequences to set background
-           and foreground, they should be coded as <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>setab</STRONG>,  respec-
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   To  change  the  current  foreground  or background color on a Tek-
+           tronix-type terminal, use <STRONG>setaf</STRONG> (set  ANSI  foreground)  and  <STRONG>setab</STRONG>
+           (set  ANSI background) or <STRONG>setf</STRONG> (set foreground) and <STRONG>setb</STRONG> (set back-
+           ground).  These take one parameter, the  color  number.   The  SVr4
+           documentation  describes only <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG>; the XPG4 draft says that
+           "If the terminal supports ANSI escape sequences to  set  background
+           and  foreground,  they  should be coded as <STRONG>setaf</STRONG> and <STRONG>setab</STRONG>, respec-
            tively.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If  the  terminal supports other escape sequences to set background
-           and foreground, they should be coded  as  <STRONG>setf</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>setb</STRONG>,  respec-
-           tively.   The  <STRONG>vidputs</STRONG>  and the <STRONG><A HREF="curs_refresh.3x.html">refresh(3x)</A></STRONG> functions use the <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If the terminal supports other escape sequences to  set  background
+           and  foreground,  they  should  be  coded as <STRONG>setf</STRONG> and <STRONG>setb</STRONG>, respec-
+           tively.  The <STRONG>vidputs</STRONG> and the <STRONG><A HREF="curs_refresh.3x.html">refresh(3x)</A></STRONG> functions  use  the  <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>
            and <STRONG>setab</STRONG> capabilities if they are defined.
 
-       The <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG> and <STRONG>setf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setb</STRONG> capabilities take a single numeric  argu-
-       ment  each.  Argument values 0-7 of <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG> are portably defined as
-       follows (the middle column is the symbolic  #define  available  in  the
-       header  for the <STRONG>curses</STRONG> or <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> libraries).  The terminal hardware is
+       The  <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG> and <STRONG>setf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setb</STRONG> capabilities take a single numeric argu-
+       ment each.  Argument values 0-7 of <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG> are portably defined  as
+       follows  (the  middle  column  is the symbolic #define available in the
+       header for the <STRONG>curses</STRONG> or <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> libraries).  The terminal hardware  is
        free to map these as it likes, but the RGB values indicate normal loca-
        tions in color space.
 
                     green     <STRONG>COLOR_GREEN</STRONG>       2     0,max,0
                     yellow    <STRONG>COLOR_YELLOW</STRONG>      3     max,max,0
                     blue      <STRONG>COLOR_BLUE</STRONG>        4     0,0,max
+
                     magenta   <STRONG>COLOR_MAGENTA</STRONG>     5     max,0,max
                     cyan      <STRONG>COLOR_CYAN</STRONG>        6     0,max,max
                     white     <STRONG>COLOR_WHITE</STRONG>       7     max,max,max
        It is important to not confuse the two sets of color capabilities; oth-
        erwise red/blue will be interchanged on the display.
 
-       On  an  HP-like terminal, use <STRONG>scp</STRONG> with a color-pair number parameter to
+       On an HP-like terminal, use <STRONG>scp</STRONG> with a color-pair number  parameter  to
        set which color pair is current.
 
        Some terminals allow the <EM>color</EM> <EM>values</EM> to be modified:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On a Tektronix-like terminal, the capability <STRONG>ccc</STRONG> may be present  to
-           indicate  that colors can be modified.  If so, the <STRONG>initc</STRONG> capability
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On  a Tektronix-like terminal, the capability <STRONG>ccc</STRONG> may be present to
+           indicate that colors can be modified.  If so, the <STRONG>initc</STRONG>  capability
            will take a color number (0 to <STRONG>colors</STRONG> - 1)and three more parameters
-           which  describe the color.  These three parameters default to being
+           which describe the color.  These three parameters default to  being
            interpreted as RGB (Red, Green, Blue) values.  If the boolean capa-
-           bility  <STRONG>hls</STRONG>  is  present,  they are instead as HLS (Hue, Lightness,
+           bility <STRONG>hls</STRONG> is present, they are instead  as  HLS  (Hue,  Lightness,
            Saturation) indices.  The ranges are terminal-dependent.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On an HP-like terminal, <STRONG>initp</STRONG> may give a capability for changing  a
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On  an HP-like terminal, <STRONG>initp</STRONG> may give a capability for changing a
            color-pair value.  It will take seven parameters; a color-pair num-
-           ber (0 to <STRONG>max_pairs</STRONG> - 1), and two triples  describing  first  back-
-           ground  and then foreground colors.  These parameters must be (Red,
+           ber  (0  to  <STRONG>max_pairs</STRONG> - 1), and two triples describing first back-
+           ground and then foreground colors.  These parameters must be  (Red,
            Green, Blue) or (Hue, Lightness, Saturation) depending on <STRONG>hls</STRONG>.
 
-       On some color terminals, colors collide with highlights.  You can  reg-
-       ister  these collisions with the <STRONG>ncv</STRONG> capability.  This is a bit-mask of
-       attributes not to be used when colors are enabled.  The  correspondence
+       On  some color terminals, colors collide with highlights.  You can reg-
+       ister these collisions with the <STRONG>ncv</STRONG> capability.  This is a bit-mask  of
+       attributes  not to be used when colors are enabled.  The correspondence
        with the attributes understood by <STRONG>curses</STRONG> is as follows:
 
                   <STRONG>Attribute</STRONG>              <STRONG>Bit</STRONG>   <STRONG>Decimal</STRONG>      <STRONG>Set</STRONG> <STRONG>by</STRONG>
                   A_VERTICAL             14    16384        sgr1
                   A_ITALIC               15    32768        sitm
 
-       For  example, on many IBM PC consoles, the underline attribute collides
-       with the foreground color blue and is  not  available  in  color  mode.
+       For example, on many IBM PC consoles, the underline attribute  collides
+       with  the  foreground  color  blue  and is not available in color mode.
        These should have an <STRONG>ncv</STRONG> capability of 2.
 
-       SVr4  curses does nothing with <STRONG>ncv</STRONG>, ncurses recognizes it and optimizes
+       SVr4 curses does nothing with <STRONG>ncv</STRONG>, ncurses recognizes it and  optimizes
        the output in favor of colors.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Miscellaneous">Miscellaneous</a></H3><PRE>
-       If the terminal requires other than a null (zero) character as  a  pad,
-       then  this  can  be  given as pad.  Only the first character of the pad
+       If  the  terminal requires other than a null (zero) character as a pad,
+       then this can be given as pad.  Only the first  character  of  the  pad
        string is used.  If the terminal does not have a pad character, specify
-       npc.   Note that ncurses implements the termcap-compatible <STRONG>PC</STRONG> variable;
-       though the application may set this value to  something  other  than  a
-       null,  ncurses will test <STRONG>npc</STRONG> first and use napms if the terminal has no
+       npc.  Note that ncurses implements the termcap-compatible <STRONG>PC</STRONG>  variable;
+       though  the  application  may  set this value to something other than a
+       null, ncurses will test <STRONG>npc</STRONG> first and use napms if the terminal has  no
        pad character.
 
-       If the terminal can move up or down half a line, this can be  indicated
+       If  the terminal can move up or down half a line, this can be indicated
        with <STRONG>hu</STRONG> (half-line up) and <STRONG>hd</STRONG> (half-line down).  This is primarily use-
        ful for superscripts and subscripts on hard-copy terminals.  If a hard-
-       copy  terminal  can eject to the next page (form feed), give this as <STRONG>ff</STRONG>
-       (usually control L).
+       copy terminal can eject to the next page (form feed), give this  as  <STRONG>ff</STRONG>
+       (usually control/L).
 
-       If there is a command to repeat a given character  a  given  number  of
-       times  (to  save  time transmitting a large number of identical charac-
-       ters) this can be indicated with the  parameterized  string  <STRONG>rep</STRONG>.   The
-       first  parameter  is the character to be repeated and the second is the
+       If  there  is  a  command to repeat a given character a given number of
+       times (to save time transmitting a large number  of  identical  charac-
+       ters)  this  can  be  indicated with the parameterized string <STRONG>rep</STRONG>.  The
+       first parameter is the character to be repeated and the second  is  the
        number of times to repeat it.  Thus, tparm(repeat_char, 'x', 10) is the
        same as "xxxxxxxxxx".
 
        If the terminal has a settable command character, such as the TEKTRONIX
-       4025, this can be indicated with <STRONG>cmdch</STRONG>.  A prototype command  character
-       is  chosen  which is used in all capabilities.  This character is given
-       in the <STRONG>cmdch</STRONG> capability to identify it.  The  following  convention  is
+       4025,  this can be indicated with <STRONG>cmdch</STRONG>.  A prototype command character
+       is chosen which is used in all capabilities.  This character  is  given
+       in  the  <STRONG>cmdch</STRONG>  capability to identify it.  The following convention is
        supported on some UNIX systems: The environment is to be searched for a
-       <STRONG>CC</STRONG> variable, and if found, all occurrences of the  prototype  character
+       <STRONG>CC</STRONG>  variable,  and if found, all occurrences of the prototype character
        are replaced with the character in the environment variable.
 
-       Terminal  descriptions  that  do not represent a specific kind of known
-       terminal, such as <EM>switch</EM>, <EM>dialup</EM>, <EM>patch</EM>, and  <EM>network</EM>,  should  include
-       the  <STRONG>gn</STRONG> (generic) capability so that programs can complain that they do
-       not know how to talk to the terminal.  (This capability does not  apply
-       to  <EM>virtual</EM>  terminal  descriptions  for which the escape sequences are
+       Terminal descriptions that do not represent a specific  kind  of  known
+       terminal,  such  as  <EM>switch</EM>, <EM>dialup</EM>, <EM>patch</EM>, and <EM>network</EM>, should include
+       the <STRONG>gn</STRONG> (generic) capability so that programs can complain that they  do
+       not  know how to talk to the terminal.  (This capability does not apply
+       to <EM>virtual</EM> terminal descriptions for which  the  escape  sequences  are
        known.)
 
        If the terminal has a "meta key" which acts as a shift key, setting the
-       8th  bit  of any character transmitted, this fact can be indicated with
-       <STRONG>km</STRONG>.  Otherwise, software will assume that the 8th bit is parity and  it
-       will  usually be cleared.  If strings exist to turn this "meta mode" on
+       8th bit of any character transmitted, this fact can be  indicated  with
+       <STRONG>km</STRONG>.   Otherwise, software will assume that the 8th bit is parity and it
+       will usually be cleared.  If strings exist to turn this "meta mode"  on
        and off, they can be given as <STRONG>smm</STRONG> and <STRONG>rmm</STRONG>.
 
        If the terminal has more lines of memory than will fit on the screen at
-       once,  the number of lines of memory can be indicated with <STRONG>lm</STRONG>.  A value
+       once, the number of lines of memory can be indicated with <STRONG>lm</STRONG>.  A  value
        of <STRONG>lm</STRONG>#0 indicates that the number of lines is not fixed, but that there
        is still more memory than fits on the screen.
 
-       If  the terminal is one of those supported by the UNIX virtual terminal
+       If the terminal is one of those supported by the UNIX virtual  terminal
        protocol, the terminal number can be given as <STRONG>vt</STRONG>.
 
-       Media copy strings which control an auxiliary printer connected to  the
-       terminal  can  be  given as <STRONG>mc0</STRONG>: print the contents of the screen, <STRONG>mc4</STRONG>:
-       turn off the printer, and <STRONG>mc5</STRONG>: turn on the printer.  When  the  printer
-       is  on,  all text sent to the terminal will be sent to the printer.  It
-       is undefined whether the text is also displayed on the terminal  screen
-       when  the  printer  is  on.   A variation <STRONG>mc5p</STRONG> takes one parameter, and
+       Media  copy strings which control an auxiliary printer connected to the
+       terminal can be given as <STRONG>mc0</STRONG>: print the contents of  the  screen,  <STRONG>mc4</STRONG>:
+       turn  off  the printer, and <STRONG>mc5</STRONG>: turn on the printer.  When the printer
+       is on, all text sent to the terminal will be sent to the  printer.   It
+       is  undefined whether the text is also displayed on the terminal screen
+       when the printer is on.  A variation  <STRONG>mc5p</STRONG>  takes  one  parameter,  and
        leaves the printer on for as many characters as the value of the param-
        eter, then turns the printer off.  The parameter should not exceed 255.
-       All text, including <STRONG>mc4</STRONG>, is transparently passed to the  printer  while
+       All  text,  including <STRONG>mc4</STRONG>, is transparently passed to the printer while
        an <STRONG>mc5p</STRONG> is in effect.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Glitches-and-Braindamage">Glitches and Braindamage</a></H3><PRE>
-       Hazeltine  terminals, which do not allow "~" characters to be displayed
+       Hazeltine terminals, which do not allow "~" characters to be  displayed
        should indicate <STRONG>hz</STRONG>.
 
-       Terminals which ignore a line-feed immediately after an <STRONG>am</STRONG>  wrap,  such
+       Terminals  which  ignore a line-feed immediately after an <STRONG>am</STRONG> wrap, such
        as the Concept and vt100, should indicate <STRONG>xenl</STRONG>.
 
-       If  <STRONG>el</STRONG>  is  required  to get rid of standout (instead of merely writing
+       If <STRONG>el</STRONG> is required to get rid of standout  (instead  of  merely  writing
        normal text on top of it), <STRONG>xhp</STRONG> should be given.
 
        Teleray terminals, where tabs turn all characters moved over to blanks,
-       should  indicate  <STRONG>xt</STRONG> (destructive tabs).  Note: the variable indicating
-       this is now "dest_tabs_magic_smso"; in  older  versions,  it  was  tel-
+       should indicate <STRONG>xt</STRONG> (destructive tabs).  Note: the  variable  indicating
+       this  is  now  "dest_tabs_magic_smso";  in  older versions, it was tel-
        eray_glitch.  This glitch is also taken to mean that it is not possible
        to position the cursor on top of a "magic cookie", that to erase stand-
-       out  mode  it  is instead necessary to use delete and insert line.  The
+       out mode it is instead necessary to use delete and  insert  line.   The
        ncurses implementation ignores this glitch.
 
-       The Beehive Superbee, which is unable to correctly transmit the  escape
-       or  control  C  characters, has <STRONG>xsb</STRONG>, indicating that the f1 key is used
-       for escape and f2 for control C.  (Only  certain  Superbees  have  this
-       problem,  depending on the ROM.)  Note that in older terminfo versions,
+       The  Beehive Superbee, which is unable to correctly transmit the escape
+       or control/C characters, has <STRONG>xsb</STRONG>, indicating that the f1  key  is  used
+       for  escape  and  f2  for control/C.  (Only certain Superbees have this
+       problem, depending on the ROM.)  Note that in older terminfo  versions,
        this capability was called "beehive_glitch"; it is now "no_esc_ctl_c".
 
-       Other specific terminal problems may be corrected by adding more  capa-
+       Other  specific terminal problems may be corrected by adding more capa-
        bilities of the form <STRONG>x</STRONG><EM>x</EM>.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Pitfalls-of-Long-Entries">Pitfalls of Long Entries</a></H3><PRE>
-       Long  terminfo  entries are unlikely to be a problem; to date, no entry
-       has even approached terminfo's 4096-byte string-table maximum.   Unfor-
-       tunately,  the  termcap translations are much more strictly limited (to
-       1023 bytes), thus termcap translations of  long  terminfo  entries  can
+       Long terminfo entries are unlikely to be a problem; to date,  no  entry
+       has  even approached terminfo's 4096-byte string-table maximum.  Unfor-
+       tunately, the termcap translations are much more strictly  limited  (to
+       1023  bytes),  thus  termcap  translations of long terminfo entries can
        cause problems.
 
-       The  man  pages  for  4.3BSD and older versions of <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> instruct the
-       user to allocate a 1024-byte buffer for the termcap entry.   The  entry
-       gets  null-terminated by the termcap library, so that makes the maximum
-       safe length for a termcap entry 1k-1 (1023) bytes.  Depending  on  what
-       the  application  and the termcap library being used does, and where in
-       the termcap file the terminal type that <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> is  searching  for  is,
+       The man pages for 4.3BSD and older versions  of  <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG>  instruct  the
+       user  to  allocate a 1024-byte buffer for the termcap entry.  The entry
+       gets null-terminated by the termcap library, so that makes the  maximum
+       safe  length  for a termcap entry 1k-1 (1023) bytes.  Depending on what
+       the application and the termcap library being used does, and  where  in
+       the  termcap  file  the terminal type that <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> is searching for is,
        several bad things can happen.
 
-       Some  termcap libraries print a warning message or exit if they find an
+       Some termcap libraries print a warning message or exit if they find  an
        entry that's longer than 1023 bytes; others do not; others truncate the
-       entries  to  1023  bytes.  Some application programs allocate more than
+       entries to 1023 bytes.  Some application programs  allocate  more  than
        the recommended 1K for the termcap entry; others do not.
 
-       Each termcap entry has two important sizes associated with  it:  before
-       "tc"  expansion, and after "tc" expansion.  "tc" is the capability that
+       Each  termcap  entry has two important sizes associated with it: before
+       "tc" expansion, and after "tc" expansion.  "tc" is the capability  that
        tacks on another termcap entry to the end of the current one, to add on
        its capabilities.  If a termcap entry does not use the "tc" capability,
        then of course the two lengths are the same.
 
-       The "before tc expansion" length is the most important one, because  it
-       affects  more than just users of that particular terminal.  This is the
-       length of the entry as it exists in /etc/termcap, minus the  backslash-
+       The  "before tc expansion" length is the most important one, because it
+       affects more than just users of that particular terminal.  This is  the
+       length  of the entry as it exists in /etc/termcap, minus the backslash-
        newline pairs, which <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> strips out while reading it.  Some termcap
        libraries strip off the final newline, too (GNU termcap does not).  Now
        suppose:
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and the application has only allocated a 1k buffer,
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and  the termcap library (like the one in BSD/OS 1.1 and GNU) reads
-           the whole entry into the buffer, no matter what its length, to  see
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and the termcap library (like the one in BSD/OS 1.1 and GNU)  reads
+           the  whole entry into the buffer, no matter what its length, to see
            if it is the entry it wants,
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and  <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG>  is  searching  for a terminal type that either is the
-           long entry, appears in the termcap file after the  long  entry,  or
-           does  not  appear in the file at all (so that <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> has to search
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> is searching for a terminal type  that  either  is  the
+           long  entry,  appears  in the termcap file after the long entry, or
+           does not appear in the file at all (so that <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> has  to  search
            the whole termcap file).
 
-       Then <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> will overwrite memory, perhaps  its  stack,  and  probably
-       core  dump the program.  Programs like telnet are particularly vulnera-
-       ble; modern telnets pass along values like the terminal type  automati-
-       cally.   The  results are almost as undesirable with a termcap library,
-       like SunOS 4.1.3 and Ultrix 4.4, that prints warning messages  when  it
-       reads  an  overly  long  termcap entry.  If a termcap library truncates
-       long entries, like OSF/1 3.0, it is  immune  to  dying  here  but  will
+       Then  <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG>  will  overwrite  memory, perhaps its stack, and probably
+       core dump the program.  Programs like telnet are particularly  vulnera-
+       ble;  modern telnets pass along values like the terminal type automati-
+       cally.  The results are almost as undesirable with a  termcap  library,
+       like  SunOS  4.1.3 and Ultrix 4.4, that prints warning messages when it
+       reads an overly long termcap entry.  If  a  termcap  library  truncates
+       long  entries,  like  OSF/1  3.0,  it  is immune to dying here but will
        return incorrect data for the terminal.
 
-       The  "after  tc  expansion"  length  will  have a similar effect to the
+       The "after tc expansion" length will  have  a  similar  effect  to  the
        above, but only for people who actually set TERM to that terminal type,
-       since  <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG>  only  does "tc" expansion once it is found the terminal
+       since <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> only does "tc" expansion once it is  found  the  terminal
        type it was looking for, not while searching.
 
-       In summary, a termcap entry that is longer than 1023 bytes  can  cause,
-       on  various  combinations of termcap libraries and applications, a core
-       dump, warnings, or incorrect operation.  If it is too long even  before
-       "tc"  expansion,  it will have this effect even for users of some other
-       terminal types and users whose TERM variable does not  have  a  termcap
+       In  summary,  a termcap entry that is longer than 1023 bytes can cause,
+       on various combinations of termcap libraries and applications,  a  core
+       dump,  warnings, or incorrect operation.  If it is too long even before
+       "tc" expansion, it will have this effect even for users of  some  other
+       terminal  types  and  users whose TERM variable does not have a termcap
        entry.
 
-       When  in  -C (translate to termcap) mode, the <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> implementation of
-       <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG> issues warning messages when the pre-tc  length  of  a  termcap
-       translation  is  too  long.  The -c (check) option also checks resolved
+       When in -C (translate to termcap) mode, the <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  implementation  of
+       <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>  issues  warning  messages  when the pre-tc length of a termcap
+       translation is too long.  The -c (check) option  also  checks  resolved
        (after tc expansion) lengths.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Binary-Compatibility">Binary Compatibility</a></H3><PRE>
-       It is not wise to count  on  portability  of  binary  terminfo  entries
-       between  commercial  UNIX  versions.   The problem is that there are at
-       least two versions of terminfo (under HP-UX  and  AIX)  which  diverged
-       from  System  V terminfo after SVr1, and have added extension capabili-
-       ties to the string table that (in the binary format) collide with  Sys-
+       It  is  not  wise  to  count  on portability of binary terminfo entries
+       between commercial UNIX versions.  The problem is  that  there  are  at
+       least  two  versions  of  terminfo (under HP-UX and AIX) which diverged
+       from System V terminfo after SVr1, and have added  extension  capabili-
+       ties  to the string table that (in the binary format) collide with Sys-
        tem V and XSI Curses extensions.
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-EXTENSIONS">EXTENSIONS</a></H2><PRE>
-       Searching   for  terminal  descriptions  in  <STRONG>$HOME/.terminfo</STRONG>  and  TER-
+       Searching  for  terminal  descriptions  in  <STRONG>$HOME/.terminfo</STRONG>  and   TER-
        MINFO_DIRS is not supported by older implementations.
 
-       Some SVr4 <STRONG>curses</STRONG> implementations, and all  previous  to  SVr4,  do  not
+       Some  SVr4  <STRONG>curses</STRONG>  implementations,  and  all previous to SVr4, do not
        interpret the %A and %O operators in parameter strings.
 
-       SVr4/XPG4  do  not  specify  whether <STRONG>msgr</STRONG> licenses movement while in an
-       alternate-character-set mode (such modes may, among other  things,  map
-       CR  and  NL  to  characters  that  do  not trigger local motions).  The
-       <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> implementation ignores <STRONG>msgr</STRONG> in <STRONG>ALTCHARSET</STRONG>  mode.   This  raises
-       the  possibility that an XPG4 implementation making the opposite inter-
-       pretation may need terminfo entries  made  for  <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  to  have  <STRONG>msgr</STRONG>
+       SVr4/XPG4 do not specify whether <STRONG>msgr</STRONG> licenses  movement  while  in  an
+       alternate-character-set  mode  (such modes may, among other things, map
+       CR and NL to characters  that  do  not  trigger  local  motions).   The
+       <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  implementation  ignores  <STRONG>msgr</STRONG> in <STRONG>ALTCHARSET</STRONG> mode.  This raises
+       the possibility that an XPG4 implementation making the opposite  inter-
+       pretation  may  need  terminfo  entries  made  for <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> to have <STRONG>msgr</STRONG>
        turned off.
 
        The <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> library handles insert-character and insert-character modes
-       in a slightly non-standard way to get better  update  efficiency.   See
+       in  a  slightly  non-standard way to get better update efficiency.  See
        the <STRONG>Insert/Delete</STRONG> <STRONG>Character</STRONG> subsection above.
 
-       The  parameter  substitutions  for  <STRONG>set_clock</STRONG> and <STRONG>display_clock</STRONG> are not
-       documented in SVr4 or the XSI Curses standard.  They are  deduced  from
+       The parameter substitutions for <STRONG>set_clock</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>display_clock</STRONG>  are  not
+       documented  in  SVr4 or the XSI Curses standard.  They are deduced from
        the documentation for the AT&amp;T 505 terminal.
 
-       Be  careful  assigning the <STRONG>kmous</STRONG> capability.  The <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> library wants
-       to interpret it as <STRONG>KEY_MOUSE</STRONG>, for use by terminals and  emulators  like
-       xterm  that can return mouse-tracking information in the keyboard-input
+       Be careful assigning the <STRONG>kmous</STRONG> capability.  The <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  library  wants
+       to  interpret  it as <STRONG>KEY_MOUSE</STRONG>, for use by terminals and emulators like
+       xterm that can return mouse-tracking information in the  keyboard-input
        stream.
 
-       X/Open Curses does not mention  italics.   Portable  applications  must
-       assume  that  numeric  capabilities  are  signed  16-bit  values.  This
-       includes the <EM>no</EM><STRONG>_</STRONG><EM>color</EM><STRONG>_</STRONG><EM>video</EM> (ncv) capability.   The  32768  mask  value
-       used  for  italics with ncv can be confused with an absent or cancelled
-       ncv.  If italics should work with colors, then the ncv  value  must  be
+       X/Open  Curses  does  not  mention italics.  Portable applications must
+       assume that  numeric  capabilities  are  signed  16-bit  values.   This
+       includes  the  <EM>no</EM><STRONG>_</STRONG><EM>color</EM><STRONG>_</STRONG><EM>video</EM>  (ncv)  capability.  The 32768 mask value
+       used for italics with ncv can be confused with an absent  or  cancelled
+       ncv.   If  italics  should work with colors, then the ncv value must be
        specified, even if it is zero.
 
-       Different  commercial  ports  of  terminfo and curses support different
+       Different commercial ports of terminfo  and  curses  support  different
        subsets of the XSI Curses standard and (in some cases) different exten-
        sion sets.  Here is a summary, accurate as of October 1995:
 
            capability (<STRONG>set_pglen</STRONG>).
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>SVr1,</STRONG> <STRONG>Ultrix</STRONG> -- These support a restricted subset of terminfo capa-
-           bilities.   The  booleans  end  with  <STRONG>xon_xoff</STRONG>;  the  numerics with
+           bilities.  The  booleans  end  with  <STRONG>xon_xoff</STRONG>;  the  numerics  with
            <STRONG>width_status_line</STRONG>; and the strings with <STRONG>prtr_non</STRONG>.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>HP/UX</STRONG> -- Supports the  SVr1  subset,  plus  the  SVr[234]  numerics
-           <STRONG>num_labels</STRONG>,   <STRONG>label_height</STRONG>,  <STRONG>label_width</STRONG>,  plus  function  keys  11
-           through 63, plus <STRONG>plab_norm</STRONG>,  <STRONG>label_on</STRONG>,  and  <STRONG>label_off</STRONG>,  plus  some
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>HP/UX</STRONG>  --  Supports  the  SVr1  subset,  plus the SVr[234] numerics
+           <STRONG>num_labels</STRONG>,  <STRONG>label_height</STRONG>,  <STRONG>label_width</STRONG>,  plus  function  keys   11
+           through  63,  plus  <STRONG>plab_norm</STRONG>,  <STRONG>label_on</STRONG>,  and <STRONG>label_off</STRONG>, plus some
            incompatible extensions in the string table.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>AIX</STRONG>  -- Supports the SVr1 subset, plus function keys 11 through 63,
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>AIX</STRONG> -- Supports the SVr1 subset, plus function keys 11 through  63,
            plus a number of incompatible string table extensions.
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>OSF</STRONG> -- Supports both the SVr4 set and the AIX extensions.
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
-       <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="curs_color.3x.html">curs_color(3x)</A></STRONG>,  <STRONG>printf(3)</STRONG>,  <STRONG><A HREF="term.5.html">term(5)</A></STRONG>.
-       <STRONG><A HREF="term_variables.3x.html">term_variables(3x)</A></STRONG>.  <STRONG><A HREF="user_caps.5.html">user_caps(5)</A></STRONG>.
+       <STRONG><A HREF="tabs.1m.html">tabs(1m)</A></STRONG>,  <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="curs_color.3x.html">curs_color(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG>curs_vari-</STRONG>
+       <STRONG><A HREF="curs_variables.3x.html">ables(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG>printf(3)</STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="term.5.html">term(5)</A></STRONG>.  <STRONG><A HREF="term_variables.3x.html">term_variables(3x)</A></STRONG>.  <STRONG><A HREF="user_caps.5.html">user_caps(5)</A></STRONG>.
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-AUTHORS">AUTHORS</a></H2><PRE>
index 9b0b62122e9b66ce4ca684142baad532e9d8a13f..56b1b99347cd3b09b9bac8943f3de3c1959a7476 100644 (file)
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@
   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
   * authorization.                                                           *
   ****************************************************************************
-  * @Id: tic.1m,v 1.68 2019/05/18 21:59:56 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: tic.1m,v 1.69 2019/05/18 22:48:40 tom Exp @
 -->
 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
 <HTML>
        <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="captoinfo.1m.html">captoinfo(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="infotocap.1m.html">infotocap(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="toe.1m.html">toe(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>,
        <STRONG><A HREF="term.5.html">term(5)</A></STRONG>.  <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>.  <STRONG><A HREF="user_caps.5.html">user_caps(5)</A></STRONG>.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-AUTHOR">AUTHOR</a></H2><PRE>
index 2d4a174c0fdf28c14b3b362d83982fb81288115b..b63c452c28f474ddbe70ab3e51ef9aadf58b38af 100644 (file)
        <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="captoinfo.1m.html">captoinfo(1m)</A></STRONG>,  <STRONG><A HREF="infotocap.1m.html">infotocap(1m)</A></STRONG>,  <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>,  <STRONG>ter-</STRONG>
        <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">minfo(5)</A></STRONG>.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 
index 996bf11e5637b667073e6291045f94069fc96115..6ff0eebfc0df4a204a74c602610d507e17155f3d 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="clear.1.html">clear(1)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG>stty(1)</STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="tabs.1.html">tabs(1)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="tset.1.html">tset(1)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="curs_termcap.3x.html">curs_termcap(3x)</A></STRONG>.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 
index 4131977a0df6d03ba68bceba1471b37f90a90aae..cc5319de8017340c18a5bdff718a8e4716d73b6c 100644 (file)
        <STRONG>csh(1)</STRONG>,  <STRONG>sh(1)</STRONG>,  <STRONG>stty(1)</STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="curs_terminfo.3x.html">curs_terminfo(3x)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG>tty(4)</STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>,
        <STRONG>ttys(5)</STRONG>, <STRONG>environ(7)</STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190518).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.1 (patch 20190615).
 
 
 
index 6d6e9126a28025603d05d3a89f0262fe6fefb1fe..7e6101d39e0c605263c7140acb122925ef7993eb 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 <!-- 
   ****************************************************************************
-  * Copyright (c) 2017,2018 Free Software Foundation, Inc.                   *
+  * Copyright (c) 2017-2018,2019 Free Software Foundation, Inc.              *
   *                                                                          *
   * Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a  *
   * copy of this software and associated documentation files (the            *
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@
   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
   * authorization.                                                           *
   ****************************************************************************
-  * @Id: user_caps.5,v 1.9 2018/07/28 22:05:23 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: user_caps.5,v 1.10 2019/05/18 22:48:40 tom Exp @
 -->
 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
 <HTML>
index 2a127f339119288b4537c778c89b5e13eeeb8c7d..de47222592fa4b81c527a7436a7845aa0403e1d8 100644 (file)
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@
 .\" authorization.                                                           *
 .\"***************************************************************************
 .\"
-.\" $Id: tabs.1,v 1.20 2019/02/16 23:56:38 tom Exp $
+.\" $Id: tabs.1,v 1.25 2019/06/15 23:08:12 tom Exp $
 .TH @TABS@ 1 ""
 .ds n 5
 .ie \n(.g .ds `` \(lq
@@ -76,6 +76,15 @@ Curses and other full-screen applications may use hardware tabs
 in optimizing their output to the terminal.
 If the hardware tabstops differ from the information in the terminal
 database, the result is unpredictable.
+Before running curses programs,
+you should either reset tab-stops to the standard interval
+.NS
+tabs -8
+.NE
+.PP
+or use the \fB@RESET@\fP program,
+since the normal initialization sequences do not ensure that tab-stops
+are reset.
 .SH OPTIONS
 .SS General Options
 .TP 5
@@ -165,7 +174,10 @@ describes a \fBtabs\fP utility.
 However
 .bP
 This standard describes a \fB+m\fP option, to set a terminal's left-margin.
-Very few of the entries in the terminal database provide this capability.
+Very few of the entries in the terminal database provide the
+\fBsmgl\fP (\fBset_left_margin\fP) or
+\fBsmglp\fP (\fBset_left_margin_parm\fP)
+capability needed to support the feature.
 .bP
 There is no counterpart in X/Open Curses Issue 7 for this utility,
 unlike \fB@TPUT@(1)\fP.
@@ -173,11 +185,44 @@ unlike \fB@TPUT@(1)\fP.
 The \fB\-d\fP (debug) and \fB\-n\fP (no-op) options are extensions not provided
 by other implementations.
 .PP
+A \fBtabs\fP utility appeared in PWB/Unix 1.0 (1977),
+and thereafter in 3BSD (1979).
+It supported a single \*(``\-n\*('' option
+(to cause the first tab stop to be set on the left margin).
+That option is not documented by POSIX.
+Initially, \fBtabs\fP used built-in tables rather than the terminal database,
+to support a half-dozen terminal types.
+It also had built-in logic to support the left-margin,
+as well as a feature for copying the tab settings from a file.
+.PP
+Later versions of Unix, e.g., SVr4,
+added support for the terminal database,
+but kept the tables, as a fallback.
+In an earlier development effort,
+the tab-stop initialization provided by \fBtset\fP (1982)
+and incorporated into \fBtput\fP uses the terminal database,
+.PP
+POSIX documents no limits on the number of tab stops.
 Documentation for other implementations states that there is a limit on the
 number of tab stops.
 While some terminals may not accept an arbitrary number
 of tab stops, this implementation will attempt to set tab stops up to the
 right margin of the screen, if the given list happens to be that long.
+.PP
+The \fIRationale\fP section of the POSIX documentation goes into some
+detail about the ways the committee considered redesigning the
+\fBtabs\fP and \fBtput\fP utilities,
+without proposing an improved solution.
+It comments that
+.RS 5
+.PP
+no known historical version of tabs supports the capability of setting
+arbitrary tab stops.
+.RE
+.PP
+However, the \fIExplicit Lists\fP described in this manual page
+were implemented in PWB/Unix.
+Those provide the capability of setting abitrary tab stops.
 .SH SEE ALSO
 \fB@TSET@\fR(1),
 \fB@INFOCMP@\fR(1M),
index a91b173f5b3346a8a591fcb9c4dc3de0b0b05420..386dac5fdf6e0c6d271dc19e5b8bf884c0594b53 100644 (file)
@@ -1,8 +1,8 @@
-ncurses6 (6.1+20190609) unstable; urgency=low
+ncurses6 (6.1+20190615) unstable; urgency=low
 
   * latest weekly patch
 
- -- Thomas E. Dickey <dickey@invisible-island.net>  Sun, 09 Jun 2019 16:06:01 -0400
+ -- Thomas E. Dickey <dickey@invisible-island.net>  Sat, 15 Jun 2019 08:46:35 -0400
 
 ncurses6 (5.9-20131005) unstable; urgency=low
 
index a91b173f5b3346a8a591fcb9c4dc3de0b0b05420..386dac5fdf6e0c6d271dc19e5b8bf884c0594b53 100644 (file)
@@ -1,8 +1,8 @@
-ncurses6 (6.1+20190609) unstable; urgency=low
+ncurses6 (6.1+20190615) unstable; urgency=low
 
   * latest weekly patch
 
- -- Thomas E. Dickey <dickey@invisible-island.net>  Sun, 09 Jun 2019 16:06:01 -0400
+ -- Thomas E. Dickey <dickey@invisible-island.net>  Sat, 15 Jun 2019 08:46:35 -0400
 
 ncurses6 (5.9-20131005) unstable; urgency=low
 
index acd14e05bae2e63c117cbf3b533955a6262a6f29..470e2067a44c42b0d50ab868991cf3d0ebfe96c4 100644 (file)
@@ -1,8 +1,8 @@
-ncurses6 (6.1+20190609) unstable; urgency=low
+ncurses6 (6.1+20190615) unstable; urgency=low
 
   * latest weekly patch
 
- -- Thomas E. Dickey <dickey@invisible-island.net>  Sun, 09 Jun 2019 16:06:01 -0400
+ -- Thomas E. Dickey <dickey@invisible-island.net>  Sat, 15 Jun 2019 08:46:35 -0400
 
 ncurses6 (5.9-20120608) unstable; urgency=low
 
index b8dff6fbaf4071604951cb8476b0eee6fa3d6797..7ed68683fee8db0adbe77d3178304e3b12a84b7a 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-; $Id: mingw-ncurses.nsi,v 1.333 2019/06/09 20:06:01 tom Exp $\r
+; $Id: mingw-ncurses.nsi,v 1.334 2019/06/15 12:46:35 tom Exp $\r
 \r
 ; TODO add examples\r
 ; TODO bump ABI to 6\r
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@
 !define VERSION_MAJOR "6"\r
 !define VERSION_MINOR "1"\r
 !define VERSION_YYYY  "2019"\r
-!define VERSION_MMDD  "0609"\r
+!define VERSION_MMDD  "0615"\r
 !define VERSION_PATCH ${VERSION_YYYY}${VERSION_MMDD}\r
 \r
 !define MY_ABI   "5"\r
index d1d899a46613dc851c0a151587ca3052f385825d..db8b73683d25993d27f0e1112102c5bd4df7b4ce 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
 Summary: shared libraries for terminal handling
 Name: mingw32-ncurses6
 Version: 6.1
-Release: 20190609
+Release: 20190615
 License: X11
 Group: Development/Libraries
 Source: ncurses-%{version}-%{release}.tgz
index 9111f95d0ab3f9239975eb3ab19d99283a21c773..91ba3dfd3eb45150d23d5ae9731df3b03874e978 100644 (file)
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 Summary: shared libraries for terminal handling
 Name: ncurses6
 Version: 6.1
-Release: 20190609
+Release: 20190615
 License: X11
 Group: Development/Libraries
 Source: ncurses-%{version}-%{release}.tgz
index 6bda031b7d77d15e6b4cb63a85ffa32e39fd53aa..adedc134a771bec1b9180d7e9001b05cd2902ad2 100644 (file)
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 Summary: Curses library with POSIX thread support.
 Name: ncursest6
 Version: 6.1
-Release: 20190609
+Release: 20190615
 License: X11
 Group: Development/Libraries
 Source: ncurses-%{version}-%{release}.tgz