71312a565f4c5c9d68cae44f7b9e70e95a59adba
[ncurses.git] / doc / html / hackguide.html
1 <!--
2   $Id: hackguide.html,v 1.33 2020/02/02 23:34:34 tom Exp $
3   ****************************************************************************
4   * Copyright 2019,2020 Thomas E. Dickey                                     *
5   * Copyright 2000-2013,2017 Free Software Foundation, Inc.                  *
6   *                                                                          *
7   * Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a  *
8   * copy of this software and associated documentation files (the            *
9   * "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including      *
10   * without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish,      *
11   * distribute, distribute with modifications, sublicense, and/or sell       *
12   * copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is    *
13   * furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:                 *
14   *                                                                          *
15   * The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included  *
16   * in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.                   *
17   *                                                                          *
18   * THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS  *
19   * OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF               *
20   * MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT.   *
21   * IN NO EVENT SHALL THE ABOVE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM,   *
22   * DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR    *
23   * OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR    *
24   * THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.                               *
25   *                                                                          *
26   * Except as contained in this notice, the name(s) of the above copyright   *
27   * holders shall not be used in advertising or otherwise to promote the     *
28   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
29   * authorization.                                                           *
30   ****************************************************************************
31 -->
32 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
33
34 <html>
35 <head>
36   <meta name="generator" content=
37   "HTML Tidy for HTML5 for Linux version 5.2.0">
38
39   <title>A Hacker's Guide to Ncurses Internals</title>
40   <link rel="author" href="mailto:bugs-ncurses@gnu.org">
41   <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content=
42   "text/html; charset=us-ascii"><!--
43 This document is self-contained, *except* that there is one relative link to
44 the ncurses-intro.html document, expected to be in the same directory with
45 this one.
46 -->
47 </head>
48
49 <body>
50   <h1>A Hacker's Guide to NCURSES</h1>
51
52   <h1>Contents</h1>
53
54   <ul>
55     <li><a href="#abstract">Abstract</a></li>
56
57     <li>
58       <a href="#objective">Objective of the Package</a>
59
60       <ul>
61         <li><a href="#whysvr4">Why System V Curses?</a></li>
62
63         <li><a href="#extensions">How to Design Extensions</a></li>
64       </ul>
65     </li>
66
67     <li><a href="#portability">Portability and Configuration</a></li>
68
69     <li><a href="#documentation">Documentation Conventions</a></li>
70
71     <li><a href="#bugtrack">How to Report Bugs</a></li>
72
73     <li>
74       <a href="#ncurslib">A Tour of the Ncurses Library</a>
75
76       <ul>
77         <li><a href="#loverview">Library Overview</a></li>
78
79         <li><a href="#engine">The Engine Room</a></li>
80
81         <li><a href="#input">Keyboard Input</a></li>
82
83         <li><a href="#mouse">Mouse Events</a></li>
84
85         <li><a href="#output">Output and Screen Updating</a></li>
86       </ul>
87     </li>
88
89     <li><a href="#fmnote">The Forms and Menu Libraries</a></li>
90
91     <li>
92       <a href="#tic">A Tour of the Terminfo Compiler</a>
93
94       <ul>
95         <li><a href="#nonuse">Translation of
96         Non-<strong>use</strong> Capabilities</a></li>
97
98         <li><a href="#uses">Use Capability Resolution</a></li>
99
100         <li><a href="#translation">Source-Form Translation</a></li>
101       </ul>
102     </li>
103
104     <li><a href="#utils">Other Utilities</a></li>
105
106     <li><a href="#style">Style Tips for Developers</a></li>
107
108     <li><a href="#port">Porting Hints</a></li>
109   </ul>
110
111   <h1><a name="abstract" id="abstract">Abstract</a></h1>
112
113   <p>This document is a hacker's tour of the
114   <strong>ncurses</strong> library and utilities. It discusses
115   design philosophy, implementation methods, and the conventions
116   used for coding and documentation. It is recommended reading for
117   anyone who is interested in porting, extending or improving the
118   package.</p>
119
120   <h1><a name="objective" id="objective">Objective of the
121   Package</a></h1>
122
123   <p>The objective of the <strong>ncurses</strong> package is to
124   provide a free software API for character-cell terminals and
125   terminal emulators with the following characteristics:</p>
126
127   <ul>
128     <li>Source-compatible with historical curses implementations
129     (including the original BSD curses and System V curses.</li>
130
131     <li>Conformant with the XSI Curses standard issued as part of
132     XPG4 by X/Open.</li>
133
134     <li>High-quality &mdash; stable and reliable code, wide
135     portability, good packaging, superior documentation.</li>
136
137     <li>Featureful &mdash; should eliminate as much of the drudgery
138     of C interface programming as possible, freeing programmers to
139     think at a higher level of design.</li>
140   </ul>
141
142   <p>These objectives are in priority order. So, for example,
143   source compatibility with older version must trump featurefulness
144   &mdash; we cannot add features if it means breaking the portion
145   of the API corresponding to historical curses versions.</p>
146
147   <h2><a name="whysvr4" id="whysvr4">Why System V Curses?</a></h2>
148
149   <p>We used System V curses as a model, reverse-engineering their
150   API, in order to fulfill the first two objectives.</p>
151
152   <p>System V curses implementations can support BSD curses
153   programs with just a recompilation, so by capturing the System V
154   API we also capture BSD's.</p>
155
156   <p>More importantly for the future, the XSI Curses standard
157   issued by X/Open is explicitly and closely modeled on System V.
158   So conformance with System V took us most of the way to
159   base-level XSI conformance.</p>
160
161   <h2><a name="extensions" id="extensions">How to Design
162   Extensions</a></h2>
163
164   <p>The third objective (standards conformance) requires that it
165   be easy to condition source code using <strong>ncurses</strong>
166   so that the absence of nonstandard extensions does not break the
167   code.</p>
168
169   <p>Accordingly, we have a policy of associating with each
170   nonstandard extension a feature macro, so that ncurses client
171   code can use this macro to condition in or out the code that
172   requires the <strong>ncurses</strong> extension.</p>
173
174   <p>For example, there is a macro
175   <code>NCURSES_MOUSE_VERSION</code> which XSI Curses does not
176   define, but which is defined in the <strong>ncurses</strong>
177   library header. You can use this to condition the calls to the
178   mouse API calls.</p>
179
180   <h1><a name="portability" id="portability">Portability and
181   Configuration</a></h1>
182
183   <p>Code written for <strong>ncurses</strong> may assume an
184   ANSI-standard C compiler and POSIX-compatible OS interface. It
185   may also assume the presence of a System-V-compatible
186   <em>select(2)</em> call.</p>
187
188   <p>We encourage (but do not require) developers to make the code
189   friendly to less-capable UNIX environments wherever possible.</p>
190
191   <p>We encourage developers to support OS-specific optimizations
192   and methods not available under POSIX/ANSI, provided only
193   that:</p>
194
195   <ul>
196     <li>All such code is properly conditioned so the build process
197     does not attempt to compile it under a plain ANSI/POSIX
198     environment.</li>
199
200     <li>Adding such implementation methods does not introduce
201     incompatibilities in the <strong>ncurses</strong> API between
202     platforms.</li>
203   </ul>
204
205   <p>We use GNU <code>autoconf(1)</code> as a tool to deal with
206   portability issues. The right way to leverage an OS-specific
207   feature is to modify the autoconf specification files
208   (configure.in and aclocal.m4) to set up a new feature macro,
209   which you then use to condition your code.</p>
210
211   <h1><a name="documentation" id="documentation">Documentation
212   Conventions</a></h1>
213
214   <p>There are three kinds of documentation associated with this
215   package. Each has a different preferred format:</p>
216
217   <ul>
218     <li>Package-internal files (README, INSTALL, TO-DO etc.)</li>
219
220     <li>Manual pages.</li>
221
222     <li>Everything else (i.e., narrative documentation).</li>
223   </ul>
224
225   <p>Our conventions are simple:</p>
226
227   <ol>
228     <li><strong>Maintain package-internal files in plain
229     text.</strong> The expected viewer for them <em>more(1)</em> or
230     an editor window; there is no point in elaborate mark-up.</li>
231
232     <li><strong>Mark up manual pages in the man macros.</strong>
233     These have to be viewable through traditional <em>man(1)</em>
234     programs.</li>
235
236     <li><strong>Write everything else in HTML.</strong>
237     </li>
238   </ol>
239
240   <p>When in doubt, HTMLize a master and use <em>lynx(1)</em> to
241   generate plain ASCII (as we do for the announcement
242   document).</p>
243
244   <p>The reason for choosing HTML is that it is (a) well-adapted
245   for on-line browsing through viewers that are everywhere; (b)
246   more easily readable as plain text than most other mark-ups, if
247   you do not have a viewer; and (c) carries enough information that
248   you can generate a nice-looking printed version from it. Also, of
249   course, it make exporting things like the announcement document
250   to WWW pretty trivial.</p>
251
252   <h1><a name="bugtrack" id="bugtrack">How to Report Bugs</a></h1>
253
254   <p>The <a name="bugreport" id="bugreport">reporting address for
255   bugs</a> is <a href=
256   "mailto:bug-ncurses@gnu.org">bug-ncurses@gnu.org</a>. This is a
257   majordomo list; to join, write to
258   <code>bug-ncurses-request@gnu.org</code> with a message
259   containing the line:</p>
260
261   <pre>
262              subscribe &lt;name&gt;@&lt;host.domain&gt;
263 </pre>
264
265   <p>The <code>ncurses</code> code is maintained by a small group
266   of volunteers. While we try our best to fix bugs promptly, we
267   simply do not have a lot of hours to spend on elementary
268   hand-holding. We rely on intelligent cooperation from our users.
269   If you think you have found a bug in <code>ncurses</code>, there
270   are some steps you can take before contacting us that will help
271   get the bug fixed quickly.</p>
272
273   <p>In order to use our bug-fixing time efficiently, we put people
274   who show us they have taken these steps at the head of our queue.
275   This means that if you do not, you will probably end up at the
276   tail end and have to wait a while.</p>
277
278   <ol>
279     <li>Develop a recipe to reproduce the bug.
280
281       <p>Bugs we can reproduce are likely to be fixed very quickly,
282       often within days. The most effective single thing you can do
283       to get a quick fix is develop a way we can duplicate the bad
284       behavior &mdash; ideally, by giving us source for a small,
285       portable test program that breaks the library. (Even better
286       is a keystroke recipe using one of the test programs provided
287       with the distribution.)</p>
288     </li>
289
290     <li>Try to reproduce the bug on a different terminal type.
291
292       <p>In our experience, most of the behaviors people report as
293       library bugs are actually due to subtle problems in terminal
294       descriptions. This is especially likely to be true if you are
295       using a traditional asynchronous terminal or PC-based
296       terminal emulator, rather than xterm or a UNIX console
297       entry.</p>
298
299       <p>It is therefore extremely helpful if you can tell us
300       whether or not your problem reproduces on other terminal
301       types. Usually you will have both a console type and xterm
302       available; please tell us whether or not your bug reproduces
303       on both.</p>
304
305       <p>If you have xterm available, it is also good to collect
306       xterm reports for different window sizes. This is especially
307       true if you normally use an unusual xterm window size &mdash;
308       a surprising number of the bugs we have seen are either
309       triggered or masked by these.</p>
310     </li>
311
312     <li>Generate and examine a trace file for the broken behavior.
313
314       <p>Recompile your program with the debugging versions of the
315       libraries. Insert a <code>trace()</code> call with the
316       argument set to <code>TRACE_UPDATE</code>. (See <a href=
317       "ncurses-intro.html#debugging">"Writing Programs with
318       NCURSES"</a> for details on trace levels.) Reproduce your
319       bug, then look at the trace file to see what the library was
320       actually doing.</p>
321
322       <p>Another frequent cause of apparent bugs is application
323       coding errors that cause the wrong things to be put on the
324       virtual screen. Looking at the virtual-screen dumps in the
325       trace file will tell you immediately if this is happening,
326       and save you from the possible embarrassment of being told
327       that the bug is in your code and is your problem rather than
328       ours.</p>
329
330       <p>If the virtual-screen dumps look correct but the bug
331       persists, it is possible to crank up the trace level to give
332       more and more information about the library's update actions
333       and the control sequences it issues to perform them. The test
334       directory of the distribution contains a tool for digesting
335       these logs to make them less tedious to wade through.</p>
336
337       <p>Often you will find terminfo problems at this stage by
338       noticing that the escape sequences put out for various
339       capabilities are wrong. If not, you are likely to learn
340       enough to be able to characterize any bug in the
341       screen-update logic quite exactly.</p>
342     </li>
343
344     <li>Report details and symptoms, not just interpretations.
345
346       <p>If you do the preceding two steps, it is very likely that
347       you will discover the nature of the problem yourself and be
348       able to send us a fix. This will create happy feelings all
349       around and earn you good karma for the first time you run
350       into a bug you really cannot characterize and fix
351       yourself.</p>
352
353       <p>If you are still stuck, at least you will know what to
354       tell us. Remember, we need details. If you guess about what
355       is safe to leave out, you are too likely to be wrong.</p>
356
357       <p>If your bug produces a bad update, include a trace file.
358       Try to make the trace at the <em>least</em> voluminous level
359       that pins down the bug. Logs that have been through
360       tracemunch are OK, it does not throw away any information
361       (actually they are better than un-munched ones because they
362       are easier to read).</p>
363
364       <p>If your bug produces a core-dump, please include a
365       symbolic stack trace generated by gdb(1) or your local
366       equivalent.</p>
367
368       <p>Tell us about every terminal on which you have reproduced
369       the bug &mdash; and every terminal on which you cannot.
370       Ideally, send us terminfo sources for all of these (yours
371       might differ from ours).</p>
372
373       <p>Include your ncurses version and your OS/machine type, of
374       course! You can find your ncurses version in the
375       <code>curses.h</code> file.</p>
376     </li>
377   </ol>
378
379   <p>If your problem smells like a logic error or in cursor
380   movement or scrolling or a bad capability, there are a couple of
381   tiny test frames for the library algorithms in the progs
382   directory that may help you isolate it. These are not part of the
383   normal build, but do have their own make productions.</p>
384
385   <p>The most important of these is <code>mvcur</code>, a test
386   frame for the cursor-movement optimization code. With this
387   program, you can see directly what control sequences will be
388   emitted for any given cursor movement or scroll/insert/delete
389   operations. If you think you have got a bad capability
390   identified, you can disable it and test again. The program is
391   command-driven and has on-line help.</p>
392
393   <p>If you think the vertical-scroll optimization is broken, or
394   just want to understand how it works better, build
395   <code>hashmap</code> and read the header comments of
396   <code>hardscroll.c</code> and <code>hashmap.c</code>; then try it
397   out. You can also test the hardware-scrolling optimization
398   separately with <code>hardscroll</code>.</p>
399
400   <h1><a name="ncurslib" id="ncurslib">A Tour of the Ncurses
401   Library</a></h1>
402
403   <h2><a name="loverview" id="loverview">Library Overview</a></h2>
404
405   <p>Most of the library is superstructure &mdash; fairly trivial
406   convenience interfaces to a small set of basic functions and data
407   structures used to manipulate the virtual screen (in particular,
408   none of this code does any I/O except through calls to more
409   fundamental modules described below). The files</p>
410
411   <blockquote>
412     <code>lib_addch.c lib_bkgd.c lib_box.c lib_chgat.c lib_clear.c
413     lib_clearok.c lib_clrbot.c lib_clreol.c lib_colorset.c
414     lib_data.c lib_delch.c lib_delwin.c lib_echo.c lib_erase.c
415     lib_gen.c lib_getstr.c lib_hline.c lib_immedok.c lib_inchstr.c
416     lib_insch.c lib_insdel.c lib_insstr.c lib_instr.c
417     lib_isendwin.c lib_keyname.c lib_leaveok.c lib_move.c
418     lib_mvwin.c lib_overlay.c lib_pad.c lib_printw.c lib_redrawln.c
419     lib_scanw.c lib_screen.c lib_scroll.c lib_scrollok.c
420     lib_scrreg.c lib_set_term.c lib_slk.c lib_slkatr_set.c
421     lib_slkatrof.c lib_slkatron.c lib_slkatrset.c lib_slkattr.c
422     lib_slkclear.c lib_slkcolor.c lib_slkinit.c lib_slklab.c
423     lib_slkrefr.c lib_slkset.c lib_slktouch.c lib_touch.c
424     lib_unctrl.c lib_vline.c lib_wattroff.c lib_wattron.c
425     lib_window.c</code>
426   </blockquote>
427
428   <p>are all in this category. They are very unlikely to need
429   change, barring bugs or some fundamental reorganization in the
430   underlying data structures.</p>
431
432   <p>These files are used only for debugging support:</p>
433
434   <blockquote>
435     <code>lib_trace.c lib_traceatr.c lib_tracebits.c lib_tracechr.c
436     lib_tracedmp.c lib_tracemse.c trace_buf.c</code>
437   </blockquote>
438
439   <p>It is rather unlikely you will ever need to change these,
440   unless you want to introduce a new debug trace level for some
441   reason.</p>
442
443   <p>There is another group of files that do direct I/O via
444   <em>tputs()</em>, computations on the terminal capabilities, or
445   queries to the OS environment, but nevertheless have only fairly
446   low complexity. These include:</p>
447
448   <blockquote>
449     <code>lib_acs.c lib_beep.c lib_color.c lib_endwin.c
450     lib_initscr.c lib_longname.c lib_newterm.c lib_options.c
451     lib_termcap.c lib_ti.c lib_tparm.c lib_tputs.c lib_vidattr.c
452     read_entry.c.</code>
453   </blockquote>
454
455   <p>They are likely to need revision only if ncurses is being
456   ported to an environment without an underlying terminfo
457   capability representation.</p>
458
459   <p>These files have serious hooks into the tty driver and signal
460   facilities:</p>
461
462   <blockquote>
463     <code>lib_kernel.c lib_baudrate.c lib_raw.c lib_tstp.c
464     lib_twait.c</code>
465   </blockquote>
466
467   <p>If you run into porting snafus moving the package to another
468   UNIX, the problem is likely to be in one of these files. The file
469   <code>lib_print.c</code> uses sleep(2) and also falls in this
470   category.</p>
471
472   <p>Almost all of the real work is done in the files</p>
473
474   <blockquote>
475     <code>hardscroll.c hashmap.c lib_addch.c lib_doupdate.c
476     lib_getch.c lib_mouse.c lib_mvcur.c lib_refresh.c lib_setup.c
477     lib_vidattr.c</code>
478   </blockquote>
479
480   <p>Most of the algorithmic complexity in the library lives in
481   these files. If there is a real bug in <strong>ncurses</strong>
482   itself, it is probably here. We will tour some of these files in
483   detail below (see <a href="#engine">The Engine Room</a>).</p>
484
485   <p>Finally, there is a group of files that is actually most of
486   the terminfo compiler. The reason this code lives in the
487   <strong>ncurses</strong> library is to support fallback to
488   /etc/termcap. These files include</p>
489
490   <blockquote>
491     <code>alloc_entry.c captoinfo.c comp_captab.c comp_error.c
492     comp_hash.c comp_parse.c comp_scan.c parse_entry.c
493     read_termcap.c write_entry.c</code>
494   </blockquote>
495
496   <p>We will discuss these in the compiler tour.</p>
497
498   <h2><a name="engine" id="engine">The Engine Room</a></h2>
499
500   <h3><a name="input" id="input">Keyboard Input</a></h3>
501
502   <p>All <code>ncurses</code> input funnels through the function
503   <code>wgetch()</code>, defined in <code>lib_getch.c</code>. This
504   function is tricky; it has to poll for keyboard and mouse events
505   and do a running match of incoming input against the set of
506   defined special keys.</p>
507
508   <p>The central data structure in this module is a FIFO queue,
509   used to match multiple-character input sequences against
510   special-key capabilities; also to implement pushback via
511   <code>ungetch()</code>.</p>
512
513   <p>The <code>wgetch()</code> code distinguishes between function
514   key sequences and the same sequences typed manually by doing a
515   timed wait after each input character that could lead a function
516   key sequence. If the entire sequence takes less than 1 second, it
517   is assumed to have been generated by a function key press.</p>
518
519   <p>Hackers bruised by previous encounters with variant
520   <code>select(2)</code> calls may find the code in
521   <code>lib_twait.c</code> interesting. It deals with the problem
522   that some BSD selects do not return a reliable time-left value.
523   The function <code>timed_wait()</code> effectively simulates a
524   System V select.</p>
525
526   <h3><a name="mouse" id="mouse">Mouse Events</a></h3>
527
528   <p>If the mouse interface is active, <code>wgetch()</code> polls
529   for mouse events each call, before it goes to the keyboard for
530   input. It is up to <code>lib_mouse.c</code> how the polling is
531   accomplished; it may vary for different devices.</p>
532
533   <p>Under xterm, however, mouse event notifications come in via
534   the keyboard input stream. They are recognized by having the
535   <strong>kmous</strong> capability as a prefix. This is kind of
536   klugey, but trying to wire in recognition of a mouse key prefix
537   without going through the function-key machinery would be just
538   too painful, and this turns out to imply having the prefix
539   somewhere in the function-key capabilities at terminal-type
540   initialization.</p>
541
542   <p>This kluge only works because <strong>kmous</strong> is not
543   actually used by any historic terminal type or curses
544   implementation we know of. Best guess is it is a relic of some
545   forgotten experiment in-house at Bell Labs that did not leave any
546   traces in the publicly-distributed System V terminfo files. If
547   System V or XPG4 ever gets serious about using it again, this
548   kluge may have to change.</p>
549
550   <p>Here are some more details about mouse event handling:</p>
551
552   <p>The <code>lib_mouse()</code> code is logically split into a
553   lower level that accepts event reports in a device-dependent
554   format and an upper level that parses mouse gestures and filters
555   events. The mediating data structure is a circular queue of event
556   structures.</p>
557
558   <p>Functionally, the lower level's job is to pick up primitive
559   events and put them on the circular queue. This can happen in one
560   of two ways: either (a) <code>_nc_mouse_event()</code> detects a
561   series of incoming mouse reports and queues them, or (b) code in
562   <code>lib_getch.c</code> detects the <strong>kmous</strong>
563   prefix in the keyboard input stream and calls _nc_mouse_inline to
564   queue up a series of adjacent mouse reports.</p>
565
566   <p>In either case, <code>_nc_mouse_parse()</code> should be
567   called after the series is accepted to parse the digested mouse
568   reports (low-level events) into a gesture (a high-level or
569   composite event).</p>
570
571   <h3><a name="output" id="output">Output and Screen Updating</a></h3>
572
573   <p>With the single exception of character echoes during a
574   <code>wgetnstr()</code> call (which simulates cooked-mode line
575   editing in an ncurses window), the library normally does all its
576   output at refresh time.</p>
577
578   <p>The main job is to go from the current state of the screen (as
579   represented in the <code>curscr</code> window structure) to the
580   desired new state (as represented in the <code>newscr</code>
581   window structure), while doing as little I/O as possible.</p>
582
583   <p>The brains of this operation are the modules
584   <code>hashmap.c</code>, <code>hardscroll.c</code> and
585   <code>lib_doupdate.c</code>; the latter two use
586   <code>lib_mvcur.c</code>. Essentially, what happens looks like
587   this:</p>
588
589   <ul>
590     <li>
591       <p>The <code>hashmap.c</code> module tries to detect vertical
592       motion changes between the real and virtual screens. This
593       information is represented by the oldindex members in the
594       newscr structure. These are modified by vertical-motion and
595       clear operations, and both are re-initialized after each
596       update. To this change-journalling information, the hashmap
597       code adds deductions made using a modified Heckel algorithm
598       on hash values generated from the line contents.</p>
599     </li>
600
601     <li>
602       <p>The <code>hardscroll.c</code> module computes an optimum
603       set of scroll, insertion, and deletion operations to make the
604       indices match. It calls <code>_nc_mvcur_scrolln()</code> in
605       <code>lib_mvcur.c</code> to do those motions.</p>
606     </li>
607
608     <li>
609       <p>Then <code>lib_doupdate.c</code> goes to work. Its job is
610       to do line-by-line transformations of <code>curscr</code>
611       lines to <code>newscr</code> lines. Its main tool is the
612       routine <code>mvcur()</code> in <code>lib_mvcur.c</code>.
613       This routine does cursor-movement optimization, attempting to
614       get from given screen location A to given location B in the
615       fewest output characters possible.</p>
616     </li>
617   </ul>
618
619   <p>If you want to work on screen optimizations, you should use
620   the fact that (in the trace-enabled version of the library)
621   enabling the <code>TRACE_TIMES</code> trace level causes a report
622   to be emitted after each screen update giving the elapsed time
623   and a count of characters emitted during the update. You can use
624   this to tell when an update optimization improves efficiency.</p>
625
626   <p>In the trace-enabled version of the library, it is also
627   possible to disable and re-enable various optimizations at
628   runtime by tweaking the variable
629   <code>_nc_optimize_enable</code>. See the file
630   <code>include/curses.h.in</code> for mask values, near the
631   end.</p>
632
633   <h1><a name="fmnote" id="fmnote">The Forms and Menu Libraries</a></h1>
634
635   <p>The forms and menu libraries should work reliably in any
636   environment you can port ncurses to. The only portability issue
637   anywhere in them is what flavor of regular expressions the
638   built-in form field type TYPE_REGEXP will recognize.</p>
639
640   <p>The configuration code prefers the POSIX regex facility,
641   modeled on System V's, but will settle for BSD regexps if the
642   former is not available.</p>
643
644   <p>Historical note: the panels code was written primarily to
645   assist in porting u386mon 2.0 (comp.sources.misc v14i001-4) to
646   systems lacking panels support; u386mon 2.10 and beyond use it.
647   This version has been slightly cleaned up for
648   <code>ncurses</code>.</p>
649
650   <h1><a name="tic" id="tic">A Tour of the Terminfo Compiler</a></h1>
651
652   <p>The <strong>ncurses</strong> implementation of
653   <strong>tic</strong> is rather complex internally; it has to do a
654   trying combination of missions. This starts with the fact that,
655   in addition to its normal duty of compiling terminfo sources into
656   loadable terminfo binaries, it has to be able to handle termcap
657   syntax and compile that too into terminfo entries.</p>
658
659   <p>The implementation therefore starts with a table-driven,
660   dual-mode lexical analyzer (in <code>comp_scan.c</code>). The
661   lexer chooses its mode (termcap or terminfo) based on the first
662   &ldquo;,&rdquo; or &ldquo;:&rdquo; it finds in each entry. The
663   lexer does all the work of recognizing capability names and
664   values; the grammar above it is trivial, just "parse entries till
665   you run out of file".</p>
666
667   <h2><a name="nonuse" id="nonuse">Translation of
668   Non-<strong>use</strong> Capabilities</a></h2>
669
670   <p>Translation of most things besides <strong>use</strong>
671   capabilities is pretty straightforward. The lexical analyzer's
672   tokenizer hands each capability name to a hash function, which
673   drives a table lookup. The table entry yields an index which is
674   used to look up the token type in another table, and controls
675   interpretation of the value.</p>
676
677   <p>One possibly interesting aspect of the implementation is the
678   way the compiler tables are initialized. All the tables are
679   generated by various awk/sed/sh scripts from a master table
680   <code>include/Caps</code>; these scripts actually write C
681   initializers which are linked to the compiler. Furthermore, the
682   hash table is generated in the same way, so it doesn't have to be
683   generated at compiler startup time (another benefit of this
684   organization is that the hash table can be in shareable text
685   space).</p>
686
687   <p>Thus, adding a new capability is usually pretty trivial, just
688   a matter of adding one line to the <code>include/Caps</code>
689   file. We will have more to say about this in the section on
690   <a href="#translation">Source-Form Translation</a>.</p>
691
692   <h2><a name="uses" id="uses">Use Capability Resolution</a></h2>
693
694   <p>The background problem that makes <strong>tic</strong> tricky
695   is not the capability translation itself, it is the resolution of
696   <strong>use</strong> capabilities. Older versions would not
697   handle forward <strong>use</strong> references for this reason
698   (that is, a using terminal always had to follow its use target in
699   the source file). By doing this, they got away with a simple
700   implementation tactic; compile everything as it blows by, then
701   resolve uses from compiled entries.</p>
702
703   <p>This will not do for <strong>ncurses</strong>. The problem is
704   that that the whole compilation process has to be embeddable in
705   the <strong>ncurses</strong> library so that it can be called by
706   the startup code to translate termcap entries on the fly. The
707   embedded version cannot go promiscuously writing everything it
708   translates out to disk &mdash; for one thing, it will typically
709   be running with non-root permissions.</p>
710
711   <p>So our <strong>tic</strong> is designed to parse an entire
712   terminfo file into a doubly-linked circular list of entry
713   structures in-core, and then do <strong>use</strong> resolution
714   in-memory before writing everything out. This design has other
715   advantages: it makes forward and back use-references equally easy
716   (so we get the latter for free), and it makes checking for name
717   collisions before they are written out easy to do.</p>
718
719   <p>And this is exactly how the embedded version works. But the
720   stand-alone user-accessible version of <strong>tic</strong>
721   partly reverts to the historical strategy; it writes to disk (not
722   keeping in core) any entry with no <strong>use</strong>
723   references.</p>
724
725   <p>This is strictly a core-economy kluge, implemented because the
726   terminfo master file is large enough that some core-poor systems
727   swap like crazy when you compile it all in memory...there have
728   been reports of this process taking <strong>three hours</strong>,
729   rather than the twenty seconds or less typical on the author's
730   development box.</p>
731
732   <p>So. The executable <strong>tic</strong> passes the
733   entry-parser a hook that <em>immediately</em> writes out the
734   referenced entry if it has no use capabilities. The compiler main
735   loop refrains from adding the entry to the in-core list when this
736   hook fires. If some other entry later needs to reference an entry
737   that got written immediately, that is OK; the resolution code
738   will fetch it off disk when it cannot find it in core.</p>
739
740   <p>Name collisions will still be detected, just not as cleanly.
741   The <code>write_entry()</code> code complains before overwriting
742   an entry that postdates the time of <strong>tic</strong>'s first
743   call to <code>write_entry()</code>, Thus it will complain about
744   overwriting entries newly made during the <strong>tic</strong>
745   run, but not about overwriting ones that predate it.</p>
746
747   <h2><a name="translation" id="translation">Source-Form
748   Translation</a></h2>
749
750   <p>Another use of <strong>tic</strong> is to do source
751   translation between various termcap and terminfo formats. There
752   are more variants out there than you might think; the ones we
753   know about are described in the <strong>captoinfo(1)</strong>
754   manual page.</p>
755
756   <p>The translation output code (<code>dump_entry()</code> in
757   <code>ncurses/dump_entry.c</code>) is shared with the
758   <strong>infocmp(1)</strong> utility. It takes the same internal
759   representation used to generate the binary form and dumps it to
760   standard output in a specified format.</p>
761
762   <p>The <code>include/Caps</code> file has a header comment
763   describing ways you can specify source translations for
764   nonstandard capabilities just by altering the master table. It is
765   possible to set up capability aliasing or tell the compiler to
766   plain ignore a given capability without writing any C code at
767   all.</p>
768
769   <p>For circumstances where you need to do algorithmic
770   translation, there are functions in <code>parse_entry.c</code>
771   called after the parse of each entry that are specifically
772   intended to encapsulate such translations. This, for example, is
773   where the AIX <strong>box1</strong> capability get translated to
774   an <strong>acsc</strong> string.</p>
775
776   <h1><a name="utils" id="utils">Other Utilities</a></h1>
777
778   <p>The <strong>infocmp</strong> utility is just a wrapper around
779   the same entry-dumping code used by <strong>tic</strong> for
780   source translation. Perhaps the one interesting aspect of the
781   code is the use of a predicate function passed in to
782   <code>dump_entry()</code> to control which capabilities are
783   dumped. This is necessary in order to handle both the ordinary
784   De-compilation case and entry difference reporting.</p>
785
786   <p>The <strong>tput</strong> and <strong>clear</strong> utilities
787   just do an entry load followed by a <code>tputs()</code> of a
788   selected capability.</p>
789
790   <h1><a name="style" id="style">Style Tips for Developers</a></h1>
791
792   <p>See the TO-DO file in the top-level directory of the source
793   distribution for additions that would be particularly useful.</p>
794
795   <p>The prefix <code>_nc_</code> should be used on library public
796   functions that are not part of the curses API in order to prevent
797   pollution of the application namespace. If you have to add to or
798   modify the function prototypes in curses.h.in, read
799   ncurses/MKlib_gen.sh first so you can avoid breaking XSI
800   conformance. Please join the ncurses mailing list. See the
801   INSTALL file in the top level of the distribution for details on
802   the list.</p>
803
804   <p>Look for the string <code>FIXME</code> in source files to tag
805   minor bugs and potential problems that could use fixing.</p>
806
807   <p>Do not try to auto-detect OS features in the main body of the
808   C code. That is the job of the configuration system.</p>
809
810   <p>To hold down complexity, do make your code data-driven.
811   Especially, if you can drive logic from a table filtered out of
812   <code>include/Caps</code>, do it. If you find you need to augment
813   the data in that file in order to generate the proper table, that
814   is still preferable to ad-hoc code &mdash; that is why the fifth
815   field (flags) is there.</p>
816
817   <p>Have fun!</p>
818
819   <h1><a name="port" id="port">Porting Hints</a></h1>
820
821   <p>The following notes are intended to be a first step towards
822   DOS and Macintosh ports of the ncurses libraries.</p>
823
824   <p>The following library modules are &ldquo;pure curses&rdquo;;
825   they operate only on the curses internal structures, do all
826   output through other curses calls (not including
827   <code>tputs()</code> and <code>putp()</code>) and do not call any
828   other UNIX routines such as signal(2) or the stdio library. Thus,
829   they should not need to be modified for single-terminal
830   ports.</p>
831
832   <blockquote>
833     <code>lib_addch.c lib_addstr.c lib_bkgd.c lib_box.c lib_clear.c
834     lib_clrbot.c lib_clreol.c lib_delch.c lib_delwin.c lib_erase.c
835     lib_inchstr.c lib_insch.c lib_insdel.c lib_insstr.c
836     lib_keyname.c lib_move.c lib_mvwin.c lib_newwin.c lib_overlay.c
837     lib_pad.c lib_printw.c lib_refresh.c lib_scanw.c lib_scroll.c
838     lib_scrreg.c lib_set_term.c lib_touch.c lib_tparm.c lib_tputs.c
839     lib_unctrl.c lib_window.c panel.c</code>
840   </blockquote>
841
842   <p>This module is pure curses, but calls outstr():</p>
843
844   <blockquote>
845     <code>lib_getstr.c</code>
846   </blockquote>
847
848   <p>These modules are pure curses, except that they use
849   <code>tputs()</code> and <code>putp()</code>:</p>
850
851   <blockquote>
852     <code>lib_beep.c lib_color.c lib_endwin.c lib_options.c
853     lib_slk.c lib_vidattr.c</code>
854   </blockquote>
855
856   <p>This modules assist in POSIX emulation on non-POSIX
857   systems:</p>
858
859   <dl>
860     <dt>sigaction.c</dt>
861
862     <dd>signal calls</dd>
863   </dl>
864
865   <p>The following source files will not be needed for a
866   single-terminal-type port.</p>
867
868   <blockquote>
869     <code>alloc_entry.c captoinfo.c clear.c comp_captab.c
870     comp_error.c comp_hash.c comp_main.c comp_parse.c comp_scan.c
871     dump_entry.c infocmp.c parse_entry.c read_entry.c tput.c
872     write_entry.c</code>
873   </blockquote>
874
875   <p>The following modules will use
876   open()/read()/write()/close()/lseek() on files, but no other OS
877   calls.</p>
878
879   <dl>
880     <dt>lib_screen.c</dt>
881
882     <dd>used to read/write screen dumps</dd>
883
884     <dt>lib_trace.c</dt>
885
886     <dd>used to write trace data to the logfile</dd>
887   </dl>
888
889   <p>Modules that would have to be modified for a port start
890   here:</p>
891
892   <p>The following modules are &ldquo;pure curses&rdquo; but
893   contain assumptions inappropriate for a memory-mapped port.</p>
894
895   <dl>
896     <dt>lib_longname.c</dt>
897
898     <dd>assumes there may be multiple terminals</dd>
899
900     <dt>lib_acs.c</dt>
901
902     <dd>assumes acs_map as a double indirection</dd>
903
904     <dt>lib_mvcur.c</dt>
905
906     <dd>assumes cursor moves have variable cost</dd>
907
908     <dt>lib_termcap.c</dt>
909
910     <dd>assumes there may be multiple terminals</dd>
911
912     <dt>lib_ti.c</dt>
913
914     <dd>assumes there may be multiple terminals</dd>
915   </dl>
916
917   <p>The following modules use UNIX-specific calls:</p>
918
919   <dl>
920     <dt>lib_doupdate.c</dt>
921
922     <dd>input checking</dd>
923
924     <dt>lib_getch.c</dt>
925
926     <dd>read()</dd>
927
928     <dt>lib_initscr.c</dt>
929
930     <dd>getenv()</dd>
931
932     <dt>lib_newterm.c</dt>
933
934     <dt>lib_baudrate.c</dt>
935
936     <dt>lib_kernel.c</dt>
937
938     <dd>various tty-manipulation and system calls</dd>
939
940     <dt>lib_raw.c</dt>
941
942     <dd>various tty-manipulation calls</dd>
943
944     <dt>lib_setup.c</dt>
945
946     <dd>various tty-manipulation calls</dd>
947
948     <dt>lib_restart.c</dt>
949
950     <dd>various tty-manipulation calls</dd>
951
952     <dt>lib_tstp.c</dt>
953
954     <dd>signal-manipulation calls</dd>
955
956     <dt>lib_twait.c</dt>
957
958     <dd>gettimeofday(), select().</dd>
959   </dl>
960
961   <hr>
962
963   <address>
964     Eric S. Raymond &lt;esr@snark.thyrsus.com&gt;
965   </address>
966   (Note: This is <em>not</em> the <a href="#bugtrack">bug
967   address</a>!)
968 </body>
969 </html>