ncurses 6.2 - patch 20211009
authorThomas E. Dickey <dickey@invisible-island.net>
Sun, 10 Oct 2021 01:24:57 +0000 (01:24 +0000)
committerThomas E. Dickey <dickey@invisible-island.net>
Sun, 10 Oct 2021 01:24:57 +0000 (01:24 +0000)
+ implement "+m" option in tabs program.
+ fill in some details for infoton -TD
+ fix spelling/consistency in several descriptions -TD
+ use vt420+lrmm in vt420 -TD
+ modify save_tty_settings() to avoid opening /dev/tty for cases other
  than reset/init, e.g., for clear.
+ modify output of "toe -as" to show first description found rather
  than the last.
+ improve tic checks for number of parameters of smglp, smgrp, smgtp,
  and smgbp (cf: 20020525).
+ correct off-by-one comparison in last_char(), which did not allow
  special case of ":" in a terminfo description field (cf: 20120407).
+ remove check in tic that assumes that none or both parameterized and
  non-parameterized margin-setting capabilities are present
  (cf: 20101002).

40 files changed:
NEWS
VERSION
dist.mk
doc/html/man/adacurses6-config.1.html
doc/html/man/captoinfo.1m.html
doc/html/man/clear.1.html
doc/html/man/form.3x.html
doc/html/man/infocmp.1m.html
doc/html/man/infotocap.1m.html
doc/html/man/menu.3x.html
doc/html/man/ncurses.3x.html
doc/html/man/ncurses6-config.1.html
doc/html/man/panel.3x.html
doc/html/man/tabs.1.html
doc/html/man/terminfo.5.html
doc/html/man/tic.1m.html
doc/html/man/toe.1m.html
doc/html/man/tput.1.html
doc/html/man/tset.1.html
include/Caps
include/Caps.aix4
include/Caps.hpux11
include/Caps.keys
include/Caps.osf1r5
include/Caps.uwin
man/tabs.1
man/terminfo.tail
misc/terminfo.src
ncurses/tinfo/comp_scan.c
package/debian-mingw/changelog
package/debian-mingw64/changelog
package/debian/changelog
package/mingw-ncurses.nsi
package/mingw-ncurses.spec
package/ncurses.spec
package/ncursest.spec
progs/tabs.c
progs/tic.c
progs/toe.c
progs/tty_settings.c

diff --git a/NEWS b/NEWS
index fdb530d8a2e0edc75170fba7757327b689e049fd..60b7fe151c96d89e5727c4ff613b911b054dbf67 100644 (file)
--- a/NEWS
+++ b/NEWS
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@
 -- sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written        --
 -- authorization.                                                            --
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--- $Id: NEWS,v 1.3717 2021/10/02 22:25:41 tom Exp $
+-- $Id: NEWS,v 1.3721 2021/10/09 22:22:17 tom Exp $
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 This is a log of changes that ncurses has gone through since Zeyd started
@@ -46,6 +46,23 @@ See the AUTHORS file for the corresponding full names.
 Changes through 1.9.9e did not credit all contributions;
 it is not possible to add this information.
 
+20211009
+       + implement "+m" option in tabs program.
+       + fill in some details for infoton -TD
+       + fix spelling/consistency in several descriptions -TD
+       + use vt420+lrmm in vt420 -TD
+       + modify save_tty_settings() to avoid opening /dev/tty for cases other
+         than reset/init, e.g., for clear.
+       + modify output of "toe -as" to show first description found rather
+         than the last.
+       + improve tic checks for number of parameters of smglp, smgrp, smgtp,
+         and smgbp (cf: 20020525).
+       + correct off-by-one comparison in last_char(), which did not allow
+         special case of ":" in a terminfo description field (cf: 20120407).
+       + remove check in tic that assumes that none or both parameterized and
+         non-parameterized margin-setting capabilities are present
+         (cf: 20101002).
+
 20211002
        + use return-value from vsnprintf to reallocate as needed to allow for
          buffers larger than the screen size (report by "_RuRo_").
diff --git a/VERSION b/VERSION
index b146b8e0befc3138e45b60072819df00666cf0cd..b3ae0ea507bca49bac1d7969bfba02564ee12d4f 100644 (file)
--- a/VERSION
+++ b/VERSION
@@ -1 +1 @@
-5:0:10 6.2     20211002
+5:0:10 6.2     20211009
diff --git a/dist.mk b/dist.mk
index e2fa72be94abdcb940b22e4cd24f7d4d1121c2c0..fc876cb021fee044fe5b769dbfc3701b26660404 100644 (file)
--- a/dist.mk
+++ b/dist.mk
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@
 # use or other dealings in this Software without prior written               #
 # authorization.                                                             #
 ##############################################################################
-# $Id: dist.mk,v 1.1438 2021/10/02 08:31:49 tom Exp $
+# $Id: dist.mk,v 1.1439 2021/10/09 10:52:52 tom Exp $
 # Makefile for creating ncurses distributions.
 #
 # This only needs to be used directly as a makefile by developers, but
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ SHELL = /bin/sh
 # These define the major/minor/patch versions of ncurses.
 NCURSES_MAJOR = 6
 NCURSES_MINOR = 2
-NCURSES_PATCH = 20211002
+NCURSES_PATCH = 20211009
 
 # We don't append the patch to the version, since this only applies to releases
 VERSION = $(NCURSES_MAJOR).$(NCURSES_MINOR)
index 6285fb237acf3a2c70be1264a200a512e06d2524..34586bcbc16d9fa83817702b5d73cd5a4197ea49 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 
index aefa17abfa87c840bed0bb75bd4b6a461d092e2b..859599ff2940226dbed100a12d75087c5209deb8 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-AUTHOR">AUTHOR</a></H2><PRE>
index 537916a8f6c22fac50a197b558efbf5314604552..dc3ef2cf4bd287898f5fd7ee5c66a86d0036ff26 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="tput.1.html">tput(1)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 
index 6304e60fb0932f1311f38c2fdc6e69edfd372a62..dd86f1a217d2752fb565fa85634125a9fef183f7 100644 (file)
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG> and related pages whose names  begin  "form_"  for  detailed
        descriptions of the entry points.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 
index 3454a76ea53346baae1570df3bbfc99de2d23047..14da2e6a539e019d2cf47cb99379335eb31189ac 100644 (file)
 
        https://invisible-island.net/ncurses/tctest.html
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-AUTHOR">AUTHOR</a></H2><PRE>
index 3980b99a2e191714efec74547986089a92085d5e..ae11b2f21d8ffb98f8f2eb9f3217af02b8278d15 100644 (file)
@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-AUTHOR">AUTHOR</a></H2><PRE>
index 64c40f50ed366eb9a6ccf3d207e9f2e410ff0237..c4f8597c2c65e4c8c8daf8edd613ad4b802d9698 100644 (file)
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG> and related pages whose names  begin  "menu_"  for  detailed
        descriptions of the entry points.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 
index 03b8e47c1bdfa73d89ea471ad64fe663cfa2b570..9ef942c8788fda88b9cefeb8961c202d7c19df7a 100644 (file)
@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@
        method of updating  character  screens  with  reasonable  optimization.
        This  implementation  is  "new  curses"  (ncurses)  and is the approved
        replacement for 4.4BSD classic curses,  which  has  been  discontinued.
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
        The  <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  library emulates the curses library of System V Release 4
        UNIX, and XPG4 (X/Open Portability Guide) curses  (also  known  as  XSI
index 0fa8141b475a73028ff43f016420013abd6c5fd4..2e37fd09443ec2a72aca8ef5b68d948ab29d92ae 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 
index 22cf71ecee1d984eafd2984e616480141531880a..f5465d2ab12dd484b88dcd36ec7738721e368676 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="curs_variables.3x.html">curs_variables(3x)</A></STRONG>,
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-AUTHOR">AUTHOR</a></H2><PRE>
index 6bb29cd8629d1736d5051a9a076e9c4ff1ed65ff..0cc22e46591da3b0d0e65e639c56ae46a77ff459 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 <!--
   ****************************************************************************
-  * Copyright 2018-2019,2020 Thomas E. Dickey                                *
+  * Copyright 2018-2020,2021 Thomas E. Dickey                                *
   * Copyright 2008-2016,2017 Free Software Foundation, Inc.                  *
   *                                                                          *
   * Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a  *
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@
   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
   * authorization.                                                           *
   ****************************************************************************
-  * @Id: tabs.1,v 1.28 2020/12/19 21:50:22 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: tabs.1,v 1.30 2021/10/09 23:48:50 tom Exp @
 -->
 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
 <HTML>
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Predefined-Tab-Stops">Predefined Tab-Stops</a></H3><PRE>
-       X/Open defines several predefined lists of tab stops.
+       POSIX defines several predefined lists of tab stops.
 
        <STRONG>-a</STRONG>   Assembler, IBM S/370, first format
+            1,10,16,36,72
 
        <STRONG>-a2</STRONG>  Assembler, IBM S/370, second format
+            1,10,16,40,72
 
        <STRONG>-c</STRONG>   COBOL, normal format
+            1,8,12,16,20,55
 
        <STRONG>-c2</STRONG>  COBOL compact format
+            1,6,10,14,49
 
        <STRONG>-c3</STRONG>  COBOL compact format extended
+            1,6,10,14,18,22,26,30,34,38,42,46,50,54,58,62,67
 
        <STRONG>-f</STRONG>   FORTRAN
+            1,7,11,15,19,23
 
        <STRONG>-p</STRONG>   PL/I
+            1,5,9,13,17,21,25,29,33,37,41,45,49,53,57,61
 
        <STRONG>-s</STRONG>   SNOBOL
+            1,10,55
 
        <STRONG>-u</STRONG>   UNIVAC 1100 Assembler
+            1,12,20,44
+
+
+</PRE><H3><a name="h3-Margins">Margins</a></H3><PRE>
+       A  few  terminals  provide the capability for changing their left/right
+       margins.  The tabs program has an option to use this feature:
+
+       <STRONG>+m</STRONG> <EM>margin</EM>
+            The  effect  depends  on  whether  the  terminal  has  the  margin
+            capabilities:
+
+            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If  the  terminal provides the capability for setting the left
+                margin, tabs uses this, and adjusts the  available  width  for
+                tab-stops.
+
+            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If the terminal does not provide the margin capabilities, tabs
+                imitates the effect, putting the tab stops at the  appropriate
+                place  on  each  line.   The  terminal's  left-margin  is  not
+                modified.
+
+            If the <EM>margin</EM> parameter is omitted, the default is 10.  Use <STRONG>+m0</STRONG> to
+            reset  the  left  margin, i.e., to the left edge of the terminal's
+            display.  Before setting a left-margin, tabs resets the margin  to
+            reduce  problems which might arise on moving the cursor before the
+            current left-margin.
+
+       When setting or resetting the left-margin, tabs may  reset  the  right-
+       margin.
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-PORTABILITY">PORTABILITY</a></H2><PRE>
            capability needed to support the feature.
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   There  is no counterpart in X/Open Curses Issue 7 for this utility,
-           unlike <STRONG>tput(1)</STRONG>.
+           unlike <STRONG><A HREF="tput.1.html">tput(1)</A></STRONG>.
 
        The <STRONG>-d</STRONG> (debug) and <STRONG>-n</STRONG> (no-op) options are extensions  not  provided  by
        other implementations.
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="tset.1.html">tset(1)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 
 <li><a href="#h3-Implicit-Lists">Implicit Lists</a></li>
 <li><a href="#h3-Explicit-Lists">Explicit Lists</a></li>
 <li><a href="#h3-Predefined-Tab-Stops">Predefined Tab-Stops</a></li>
+<li><a href="#h3-Margins">Margins</a></li>
 </ul>
 </li>
 <li><a href="#h2-PORTABILITY">PORTABILITY</a></li>
index f4020d0351445f2b1bb9fea172d4b446ad2e12e1..ccd378d93d6efb472f682e53add8ded0bf5b4167 100644 (file)
@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@
   * sale, use or other dealings in this Software without prior written       *
   * authorization.                                                           *
   ****************************************************************************
-  * @Id: terminfo.tail,v 1.107 2021/10/02 20:54:06 tom Exp @
+  * @Id: terminfo.tail,v 1.108 2021/10/09 23:13:23 tom Exp @
   *.in -2
   *.in +2
   *.in -2
        have, by specifying how to perform screen operations, and by specifying
        padding requirements and initialization sequences.
 
-       This manual describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This manual describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Terminfo-Entry-Syntax">Terminfo Entry Syntax</a></H3><PRE>
                                                        #1
           set_left_margin             smgl      ML     set left soft margin
                                                        at current
-                                                       column.     See
-                                                       smgl. (ML is not in
-                                                       BSD termcap).
+                                                       column.     (ML is
+                                                       not in BSD termcap).
           set_left_margin_parm        smglp     Zm     Set left (right)
                                                        margin at column #1
           set_right_margin            smgr      MR     set right soft
           user3                       u3        u3     User string #3
           user4                       u4        u4     User string #4
           user5                       u5        u5     User string #5
-
           user6                       u6        u6     User string #6
+
           user7                       u7        u7     User string #7
           user8                       u8        u8     User string #8
           user9                       u9        u9     User string #9
           zero_motion                 zerom     Zx     No motion for
                                                        subsequent character
 
-       The  following  string  capabilities  are  present  in  the SVr4.0 term
+       The following string  capabilities  are  present  in  the  SVr4.0  term
        structure, but were originally not documented in the man page.
 
 
                                                         key #1 to type
                                                         string #2 and show
                                                         string #3
-
-
           req_mouse_pos               reqmp      RQ     Request mouse
                                                         position
+
           scancode_escape             scesc      S7     Escape for
                                                         scancode emulation
           set0_des_seq                s0ds       s0     Shift to codeset 0
                                                         bottom margins to
                                                         #1, #2
 
-        The  XSI Curses standard added these hardcopy capabilities.  They were
-        used in some post-4.1 versions of System V curses, e.g.,  Solaris  2.5
-        and  IRIX  6.x.  Except for <STRONG>YI</STRONG>, the <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> termcap names for them are
-        invented.  According to the XSI Curses standard, they have no  termcap
-        names.   If  your compiled terminfo entries use these, they may not be
+        The XSI Curses standard added these hardcopy capabilities.  They  were
+        used  in  some post-4.1 versions of System V curses, e.g., Solaris 2.5
+        and IRIX 6.x.  Except for <STRONG>YI</STRONG>, the <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> termcap names for  them  are
+        invented.   According to the XSI Curses standard, they have no termcap
+        names.  If your compiled terminfo entries use these, they may  not  be
         binary-compatible with System V terminfo entries after SVr4.1; beware!
 
 
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-User-Defined-Capabilities">User-Defined Capabilities</a></H3><PRE>
-       The preceding section listed the <EM>predefined</EM>  capabilities.   They  deal
-       with  some special features for terminals no longer (or possibly never)
-       produced.  Occasionally there are special features of  newer  terminals
-       which  are awkward or impossible to represent by reusing the predefined
+       The  preceding  section  listed the <EM>predefined</EM> capabilities.  They deal
+       with some special features for terminals no longer (or possibly  never)
+       produced.   Occasionally  there are special features of newer terminals
+       which are awkward or impossible to represent by reusing the  predefined
        capabilities.
 
-       <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>   addresses   this   limitation   by   allowing    user-defined
-       capabilities.   The  <STRONG>tic</STRONG> and <STRONG>infocmp</STRONG> programs provide the <STRONG>-x</STRONG> option for
+       <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>    addresses   this   limitation   by   allowing   user-defined
+       capabilities.  The <STRONG>tic</STRONG> and <STRONG>infocmp</STRONG> programs provide the <STRONG>-x</STRONG>  option  for
        this purpose.  When <STRONG>-x</STRONG> is set, <STRONG>tic</STRONG> treats unknown capabilities as user-
-       defined.   That  is,  if <STRONG>tic</STRONG> encounters a capability name which it does
-       not recognize, it infers its type (boolean, number or string) from  the
-       syntax  and  makes  an  extended  table entry for that capability.  The
-       <STRONG><A HREF="curs_extend.3x.html">use_extended_names(3x)</A></STRONG> function makes  this  information  conditionally
-       available  to  applications.   The  ncurses  library  provides the data
+       defined.  That is, if <STRONG>tic</STRONG> encounters a capability name  which  it  does
+       not  recognize, it infers its type (boolean, number or string) from the
+       syntax and makes an extended table  entry  for  that  capability.   The
+       <STRONG><A HREF="curs_extend.3x.html">use_extended_names(3x)</A></STRONG>  function  makes  this information conditionally
+       available to applications.   The  ncurses  library  provides  the  data
        leaving most of the behavior to applications:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   User-defined capability strings whose  name  begins  with  "k"  are
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   User-defined  capability  strings  whose  name  begins with "k" are
            treated as function keys.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The  types  (boolean,  number,  string)  determined  by  <STRONG>tic</STRONG> can be
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The types (boolean,  number,  string)  determined  by  <STRONG>tic</STRONG>  can  be
            inferred by successful calls on <STRONG>tigetflag</STRONG>, etc.
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If the capability name happens to be two characters, the capability
            is also available through the termcap interface.
 
-       While  termcap  is  said  to  be  extensible  because it does not use a
-       predefined set of capabilities, in practice it has been limited to  the
-       capabilities  defined  by  terminfo  implementations.  As a rule, user-
+       While termcap is said to be  extensible  because  it  does  not  use  a
+       predefined  set of capabilities, in practice it has been limited to the
+       capabilities defined by terminfo implementations.   As  a  rule,  user-
        defined capabilities intended for use by termcap applications should be
-       limited  to  booleans  and  numbers to avoid running past the 1023 byte
-       limit assumed by termcap implementations and  their  applications.   In
-       particular,  providing  extended  sets  of  function  keys (past the 60
+       limited to booleans and numbers to avoid running  past  the  1023  byte
+       limit  assumed  by  termcap implementations and their applications.  In
+       particular, providing extended sets  of  function  keys  (past  the  60
        numbered keys and the handful of special named keys) is best done using
        the longer names available using terminfo.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-A-Sample-Entry">A Sample Entry</a></H3><PRE>
-       The   following   entry,   describing  an  ANSI-standard  terminal,  is
+       The  following  entry,  describing  an   ANSI-standard   terminal,   is
        representative of what a <STRONG>terminfo</STRONG> entry for a modern terminal typically
        looks like.
 
                smul=\E[4m, tbc=\E[3g, u6=\E[%i%d;%dR, u7=\E[6n,
                u8=\E[?%[;0123456789]c, u9=\E[c, vpa=\E[%i%p1%dd,
 
-       Entries  may continue onto multiple lines by placing white space at the
-       beginning of each line except the first.  Comments may be  included  on
+       Entries may continue onto multiple lines by placing white space at  the
+       beginning  of  each line except the first.  Comments may be included on
        lines beginning with "#".  Capabilities in <EM>terminfo</EM> are of three types:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Boolean  capabilities  which  indicate  that  the terminal has some
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Boolean capabilities which indicate  that  the  terminal  has  some
            particular feature,
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   numeric capabilities giving the size of the terminal or the size of
            particular delays, and
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   string  capabilities,  which  give  a sequence which can be used to
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   string capabilities, which give a sequence which  can  be  used  to
            perform particular terminal operations.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Types-of-Capabilities">Types of Capabilities</a></H3><PRE>
        All capabilities have names.  For instance, the fact that ANSI-standard
-       terminals  have  <EM>automatic</EM> <EM>margins</EM> (i.e., an automatic return and line-
-       feed when the end of a line is reached) is indicated by the  capability
-       <STRONG>am</STRONG>.   Hence  the description of ansi includes <STRONG>am</STRONG>.  Numeric capabilities
-       are followed by the character "#" and  then  a  positive  value.   Thus
+       terminals have <EM>automatic</EM> <EM>margins</EM> (i.e., an automatic return  and  line-
+       feed  when the end of a line is reached) is indicated by the capability
+       <STRONG>am</STRONG>.  Hence the description of ansi includes <STRONG>am</STRONG>.   Numeric  capabilities
+       are  followed  by  the  character  "#" and then a positive value.  Thus
        <STRONG>cols</STRONG>, which indicates the number of columns the terminal has, gives the
-       value "80" for ansi.  Values for numeric capabilities may be  specified
-       in  decimal,  octal  or  hexadecimal,  using the C programming language
+       value  "80" for ansi.  Values for numeric capabilities may be specified
+       in decimal, octal or hexadecimal,  using  the  C  programming  language
        conventions (e.g., 255, 0377 and 0xff or 0xFF).
 
-       Finally, string valued capabilities, such as <STRONG>el</STRONG> (clear to end  of  line
-       sequence)  are  given  by  the  two-character  code, an "=", and then a
+       Finally,  string  valued capabilities, such as <STRONG>el</STRONG> (clear to end of line
+       sequence) are given by the two-character  code,  an  "=",  and  then  a
        string ending at the next following ",".
 
-       A number  of  escape  sequences  are  provided  in  the  string  valued
+       A  number  of  escape  sequences  are  provided  in  the  string valued
        capabilities for easy encoding of characters there:
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Both <STRONG>\E</STRONG> and <STRONG>\e</STRONG> map to an ESCAPE character,
            respectively.
 
        X/Open Curses does not say what "appropriate <EM>x</EM>" might be.  In practice,
-       that is a printable ASCII graphic character.  The special case "^?"  is
-       interpreted  as  DEL (127).  In all other cases, the character value is
-       AND'd with 0x1f, mapping to ASCII control codes in the range 0  through
+       that  is a printable ASCII graphic character.  The special case "^?" is
+       interpreted as DEL (127).  In all other cases, the character  value  is
+       AND'd  with 0x1f, mapping to ASCII control codes in the range 0 through
        31.
 
        Other escapes include
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and <STRONG>\0</STRONG> for null.
 
            <STRONG>\0</STRONG> will produce \200, which does not terminate a string but behaves
-           as a null character on most terminals, providing CS7 is  specified.
+           as  a null character on most terminals, providing CS7 is specified.
            See <STRONG>stty(1)</STRONG>.
 
-           The  reason  for  this quirk is to maintain binary compatibility of
-           the compiled terminfo files with other implementations,  e.g.,  the
-           SVr4  systems,  which  document  this.  Compiled terminfo files use
-           null-terminated strings, with no  lengths.   Modifying  this  would
-           require  a  new  binary  format,  which  would  not work with other
+           The reason for this quirk is to maintain  binary  compatibility  of
+           the  compiled  terminfo files with other implementations, e.g., the
+           SVr4 systems, which document this.   Compiled  terminfo  files  use
+           null-terminated  strings,  with  no  lengths.  Modifying this would
+           require a new binary  format,  which  would  not  work  with  other
            implementations.
 
        Finally, characters may be given as three octal digits after a <STRONG>\</STRONG>.
 
-       A delay in milliseconds may appear anywhere  in  a  string  capability,
-       enclosed  in  $&lt;..&gt;  brackets, as in <STRONG>el</STRONG>=\EK$&lt;5&gt;, and padding characters
+       A  delay  in  milliseconds  may appear anywhere in a string capability,
+       enclosed in $&lt;..&gt; brackets, as in <STRONG>el</STRONG>=\EK$&lt;5&gt;,  and  padding  characters
        are supplied by <STRONG><A HREF="curs_terminfo.3x.html">tputs(3x)</A></STRONG> to provide this delay.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The delay must be a number  with  at  most  one  decimal  place  of
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The  delay  must  be  a  number  with  at most one decimal place of
            precision; it may be followed by suffixes "*" or "/" or both.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   A  "*"  indicates  that the padding required is proportional to the
-           number of lines affected by the operation, and the amount given  is
-           the  per-affected-unit  padding  required.   (In the case of insert
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   A "*" indicates that the padding required is  proportional  to  the
+           number  of lines affected by the operation, and the amount given is
+           the per-affected-unit padding required.  (In  the  case  of  insert
            character, the factor is still the number of <EM>lines</EM> affected.)
 
            Normally, padding is advisory if the device has the <STRONG>xon</STRONG> capability;
            it is used for cost computation but does not trigger delays.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   A  "/"  suffix indicates that the padding is mandatory and forces a
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   A "/" suffix indicates that the padding is mandatory and  forces  a
            delay of the given number of milliseconds even on devices for which
            <STRONG>xon</STRONG> is present to indicate flow control.
 
-       Sometimes  individual  capabilities must be commented out.  To do this,
-       put a period before the capability name.  For example, see  the  second
+       Sometimes individual capabilities must be commented out.  To  do  this,
+       put  a  period before the capability name.  For example, see the second
        <STRONG>ind</STRONG> in the example above.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Fetching-Compiled-Descriptions">Fetching Compiled Descriptions</a></H3><PRE>
-       The  <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  library  searches  for  terminal  descriptions in several
-       places.  It uses only the first description found.  The library  has  a
-       compiled-in  list  of  places  to  search  which  can  be overridden by
-       environment variables.  Before starting to search,  <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  eliminates
+       The <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> library  searches  for  terminal  descriptions  in  several
+       places.   It  uses only the first description found.  The library has a
+       compiled-in list of  places  to  search  which  can  be  overridden  by
+       environment  variables.   Before starting to search, <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> eliminates
        duplicates in its search list.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If  the  environment variable TERMINFO is set, it is interpreted as
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If the environment variable TERMINFO is set, it is  interpreted  as
            the pathname of a directory containing the compiled description you
            are working on.  Only that directory is searched.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If  TERMINFO is not set, <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> will instead look in the directory
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If TERMINFO is not set, <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> will instead look in the  directory
            <STRONG>$HOME/.terminfo</STRONG> for a compiled description.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Next, if the environment variable  TERMINFO_DIRS  is  set,  <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>
-           will  interpret  the  contents of that variable as a list of colon-
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Next,  if  the  environment  variable TERMINFO_DIRS is set, <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>
+           will interpret the contents of that variable as a  list  of  colon-
            separated directories (or database files) to be searched.
 
-           An empty directory name (i.e., if the variable begins or ends  with
-           a  colon, or contains adjacent colons) is interpreted as the system
+           An  empty directory name (i.e., if the variable begins or ends with
+           a colon, or contains adjacent colons) is interpreted as the  system
            location <EM>/usr/share/terminfo</EM>.
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Finally, <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> searches these compiled-in locations:
 
            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   a list of directories (no default value), and
 
-           <STRONG>o</STRONG>   the  system  terminfo   directory,   <EM>/usr/share/terminfo</EM>   (the
+           <STRONG>o</STRONG>   the   system   terminfo   directory,  <EM>/usr/share/terminfo</EM>  (the
                compiled-in default).
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Preparing-Descriptions">Preparing Descriptions</a></H3><PRE>
-       We  now  outline  how  to  prepare descriptions of terminals.  The most
-       effective way to prepare a terminal description  is  by  imitating  the
-       description  of  a  similar  terminal  in  <EM>terminfo</EM>  and  to build up a
+       We now outline how to prepare  descriptions  of  terminals.   The  most
+       effective  way  to  prepare  a terminal description is by imitating the
+       description of a similar  terminal  in  <EM>terminfo</EM>  and  to  build  up  a
        description gradually, using partial descriptions with <EM>vi</EM> or some other
-       screen-oriented  program to check that they are correct.  Be aware that
-       a very unusual terminal may expose deficiencies in the ability  of  the
+       screen-oriented program to check that they are correct.  Be aware  that
+       a  very  unusual terminal may expose deficiencies in the ability of the
        <EM>terminfo</EM> file to describe it or bugs in the screen-handling code of the
        test program.
 
-       To get the padding for insert line right (if the terminal  manufacturer
-       did  not  document  it)  a  severe test is to edit a large file at 9600
+       To  get the padding for insert line right (if the terminal manufacturer
+       did not document it) a severe test is to edit  a  large  file  at  9600
        baud, delete 16 or so lines from the middle of the screen, then hit the
        "u" key several times quickly.  If the terminal messes up, more padding
        is usually needed.  A similar test can be used for insert character.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Basic-Capabilities">Basic Capabilities</a></H3><PRE>
-       The number of columns on each line for the terminal  is  given  by  the
-       <STRONG>cols</STRONG>  numeric capability.  If the terminal is a CRT, then the number of
-       lines on the screen is given by the <STRONG>lines</STRONG> capability.  If the  terminal
-       wraps  around  to  the  beginning  of the next line when it reaches the
-       right margin, then it should have the <STRONG>am</STRONG> capability.  If  the  terminal
-       can  clear  its  screen,  leaving the cursor in the home position, then
-       this is  given  by  the  <STRONG>clear</STRONG>  string  capability.   If  the  terminal
+       The  number  of  columns  on each line for the terminal is given by the
+       <STRONG>cols</STRONG> numeric capability.  If the terminal is a CRT, then the number  of
+       lines  on the screen is given by the <STRONG>lines</STRONG> capability.  If the terminal
+       wraps around to the beginning of the next  line  when  it  reaches  the
+       right  margin,  then it should have the <STRONG>am</STRONG> capability.  If the terminal
+       can clear its screen, leaving the cursor in  the  home  position,  then
+       this  is  given  by  the  <STRONG>clear</STRONG>  string  capability.   If  the terminal
        overstrikes (rather than clearing a position when a character is struck
-       over) then it should have the <STRONG>os</STRONG> capability.   If  the  terminal  is  a
+       over)  then  it  should  have  the <STRONG>os</STRONG> capability.  If the terminal is a
        printing terminal, with no soft copy unit, give it both <STRONG>hc</STRONG> and <STRONG>os</STRONG>.  (<STRONG>os</STRONG>
-       applies to storage scope terminals, such as TEKTRONIX 4010  series,  as
-       well  as  hard copy and APL terminals.)  If there is a code to move the
+       applies  to  storage scope terminals, such as TEKTRONIX 4010 series, as
+       well as hard copy and APL terminals.)  If there is a code to  move  the
        cursor to the left edge of the current row, give this as <STRONG>cr</STRONG>.  (Normally
-       this  will  be  carriage  return,  control/M.)   If  there is a code to
+       this will be carriage return,  control/M.)   If  there  is  a  code  to
        produce an audible signal (bell, beep, etc) give this as <STRONG>bel</STRONG>.
 
        If there is a code to move the cursor one position to the left (such as
-       backspace)  that  capability should be given as <STRONG>cub1</STRONG>.  Similarly, codes
-       to move to the right, up, and down should be given as <STRONG>cuf1</STRONG>,  <STRONG>cuu1</STRONG>,  and
-       <STRONG>cud1</STRONG>.   These  local cursor motions should not alter the text they pass
-       over, for example, you would not  normally  use  "<STRONG>cuf1</STRONG>= "  because  the
+       backspace) that capability should be given as <STRONG>cub1</STRONG>.   Similarly,  codes
+       to  move  to the right, up, and down should be given as <STRONG>cuf1</STRONG>, <STRONG>cuu1</STRONG>, and
+       <STRONG>cud1</STRONG>.  These local cursor motions should not alter the text  they  pass
+       over,  for  example,  you  would  not normally use "<STRONG>cuf1</STRONG>= " because the
        space would erase the character moved over.
 
        A very important point here is that the local cursor motions encoded in
-       <EM>terminfo</EM> are undefined at the left and top edges  of  a  CRT  terminal.
+       <EM>terminfo</EM>  are  undefined  at  the left and top edges of a CRT terminal.
        Programs should never attempt to backspace around the left edge, unless
-       <STRONG>bw</STRONG> is given, and never attempt to go up locally off the top.  In  order
-       to  scroll  text up, a program will go to the bottom left corner of the
+       <STRONG>bw</STRONG>  is given, and never attempt to go up locally off the top.  In order
+       to scroll text up, a program will go to the bottom left corner  of  the
        screen and send the <STRONG>ind</STRONG> (index) string.
 
-       To scroll text down, a program goes to  the  top  left  corner  of  the
+       To  scroll  text  down,  a  program  goes to the top left corner of the
        screen and sends the <STRONG>ri</STRONG> (reverse index) string.  The strings <STRONG>ind</STRONG> and <STRONG>ri</STRONG>
        are undefined when not on their respective corners of the screen.
 
-       Parameterized versions of the scrolling  sequences  are  <STRONG>indn</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>rin</STRONG>
-       which  have  the same semantics as <STRONG>ind</STRONG> and <STRONG>ri</STRONG> except that they take one
-       parameter, and scroll that many lines.  They are also undefined  except
+       Parameterized  versions  of  the  scrolling  sequences are <STRONG>indn</STRONG> and <STRONG>rin</STRONG>
+       which have the same semantics as <STRONG>ind</STRONG> and <STRONG>ri</STRONG> except that they  take  one
+       parameter,  and scroll that many lines.  They are also undefined except
        at the appropriate edge of the screen.
 
-       The  <STRONG>am</STRONG> capability tells whether the cursor sticks at the right edge of
-       the screen when text is output, but this does not necessarily apply  to
-       a  <STRONG>cuf1</STRONG>  from  the last column.  The only local motion which is defined
-       from the left edge is if <STRONG>bw</STRONG> is given, then a <STRONG>cub1</STRONG> from  the  left  edge
-       will  move  to the right edge of the previous row.  If <STRONG>bw</STRONG> is not given,
-       the effect is undefined.  This is useful for drawing a box  around  the
+       The <STRONG>am</STRONG> capability tells whether the cursor sticks at the right edge  of
+       the  screen when text is output, but this does not necessarily apply to
+       a <STRONG>cuf1</STRONG> from the last column.  The only local motion  which  is  defined
+       from  the  left  edge is if <STRONG>bw</STRONG> is given, then a <STRONG>cub1</STRONG> from the left edge
+       will move to the right edge of the previous row.  If <STRONG>bw</STRONG> is  not  given,
+       the  effect  is undefined.  This is useful for drawing a box around the
        edge of the screen, for example.  If the terminal has switch selectable
-       automatic margins, the <EM>terminfo</EM> file usually assumes that this  is  on;
-       i.e.,  <STRONG>am</STRONG>.   If  the  terminal  has  a command which moves to the first
-       column of the next line, that command can be given  as  <STRONG>nel</STRONG>  (newline).
-       It  does  not matter if the command clears the remainder of the current
-       line, so if the terminal has no <STRONG>cr</STRONG> and <STRONG>lf</STRONG> it may still be  possible  to
+       automatic  margins,  the <EM>terminfo</EM> file usually assumes that this is on;
+       i.e., <STRONG>am</STRONG>.  If the terminal has a  command  which  moves  to  the  first
+       column  of  the  next line, that command can be given as <STRONG>nel</STRONG> (newline).
+       It does not matter if the command clears the remainder of  the  current
+       line,  so  if the terminal has no <STRONG>cr</STRONG> and <STRONG>lf</STRONG> it may still be possible to
        craft a working <STRONG>nel</STRONG> out of one or both of them.
 
        These  capabilities  suffice  to  describe  hard-copy  and  "glass-tty"
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Parameterized-Strings">Parameterized Strings</a></H3><PRE>
        Cursor  addressing  and  other  strings  requiring  parameters  in  the
-       terminal  are  described  by  a  parameterized  string capability, with
-       <EM>printf</EM>-like escapes such as <EM>%x</EM> in it.   For  example,  to  address  the
-       cursor,  the <STRONG>cup</STRONG> capability is given, using two parameters: the row and
-       column to address to.  (Rows and columns are  numbered  from  zero  and
-       refer  to  the  physical  screen visible to the user, not to any unseen
-       memory.)  If the terminal has memory relative cursor  addressing,  that
+       terminal are described  by  a  parameterized  string  capability,  with
+       <EM>printf</EM>-like  escapes  such  as  <EM>%x</EM>  in it.  For example, to address the
+       cursor, the <STRONG>cup</STRONG> capability is given, using two parameters: the row  and
+       column  to  address  to.   (Rows and columns are numbered from zero and
+       refer to the physical screen visible to the user,  not  to  any  unseen
+       memory.)   If  the terminal has memory relative cursor addressing, that
        can be indicated by <STRONG>mrcup</STRONG>.
 
-       The  parameter mechanism uses a stack and special <STRONG>%</STRONG> codes to manipulate
-       it.  Typically a sequence will push one  of  the  parameters  onto  the
-       stack  and  then  print  it  in  some  format.  Print (e.g., "%d") is a
-       special case.  Other operations, including "%t" pop their operand  from
-       the  stack.   It  is  noted  that  more  complex  operations  are often
+       The parameter mechanism uses a stack and special <STRONG>%</STRONG> codes to  manipulate
+       it.   Typically  a  sequence  will  push one of the parameters onto the
+       stack and then print it in  some  format.   Print  (e.g.,  "%d")  is  a
+       special  case.  Other operations, including "%t" pop their operand from
+       the stack.   It  is  noted  that  more  complex  operations  are  often
        necessary, e.g., in the <STRONG>sgr</STRONG> string.
 
        The <STRONG>%</STRONG> encodings have the following meanings:
        <STRONG>%%</STRONG>   outputs "%"
 
        <STRONG>%</STRONG><EM>[[</EM>:<EM>]flags][width[.precision]][</EM><STRONG>doxXs</STRONG><EM>]</EM>
-            as in <STRONG>printf(3)</STRONG>, flags are <EM>[-+#]</EM> and <EM>space</EM>.  Use a  ":"  to  allow
+            as  in  <STRONG>printf(3)</STRONG>,  flags are <EM>[-+#]</EM> and <EM>space</EM>.  Use a ":" to allow
             the next character to be a "-" flag, avoiding interpreting "%-" as
             an operator.
 
        <STRONG>%g</STRONG><EM>[A-Z]</EM>
             get static variable <EM>[a-z]</EM> and push it
 
-            The terms "static" and "dynamic"  are  misleading.   Historically,
+            The  terms  "static"  and "dynamic" are misleading.  Historically,
             these are simply two different sets of variables, whose values are
-            not reset between calls to <STRONG><A HREF="curs_terminfo.3x.html">tparm(3x)</A></STRONG>.  However, that fact  is  not
+            not  reset  between calls to <STRONG><A HREF="curs_terminfo.3x.html">tparm(3x)</A></STRONG>.  However, that fact is not
             documented in other implementations.  Relying on it will adversely
             impact portability to other implementations:
 
-            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   SVr2 curses supported <EM>dynamic</EM> variables.  Those are  set  only
-                by  a  <STRONG>%P</STRONG>  operator.   A <STRONG>%g</STRONG> for a given variable without first
-                setting it with <STRONG>%P</STRONG> will give  unpredictable  results,  because
-                dynamic  variables  are  an  uninitialized  local array on the
+            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   SVr2  curses  supported <EM>dynamic</EM> variables.  Those are set only
+                by a <STRONG>%P</STRONG> operator.  A <STRONG>%g</STRONG> for a  given  variable  without  first
+                setting  it  with  <STRONG>%P</STRONG> will give unpredictable results, because
+                dynamic variables are an  uninitialized  local  array  on  the
                 stack in the <STRONG>tparm</STRONG> function.
 
-            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   SVr3.2 curses supported <EM>static</EM> variables.  Those are an  array
+            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   SVr3.2  curses supported <EM>static</EM> variables.  Those are an array
                 in the <STRONG>TERMINAL</STRONG> structure (declared in <STRONG>term.h</STRONG>), and are zeroed
                 automatically when the <STRONG>setupterm</STRONG> function allocates the data.
 
             <STRONG>o</STRONG>   SVr4 curses made no further improvements to the <EM>dynamic/static</EM>
                 variable feature.
 
-            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Solaris  XPG4  curses does not distinguish between <EM>dynamic</EM> and
-                <EM>static</EM> variables.  They are the same.  Like SVr4 curses,  XPG4
+            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Solaris XPG4 curses does not distinguish between  <EM>dynamic</EM>  and
+                <EM>static</EM>  variables.  They are the same.  Like SVr4 curses, XPG4
                 curses does not initialize these explicitly.
 
-            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Before  version  6.3,  ncurses  stores both <EM>dynamic</EM> and <EM>static</EM>
+            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Before version 6.3, ncurses stores  both  <EM>dynamic</EM>  and  <EM>static</EM>
                 variables in persistent storage, initialized to zeros.
 
-            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Beginning with version 6.3, ncurses stores <EM>static</EM> and  <EM>dynamic</EM>
-                variables   in   the   same  manner  as  SVr4.   Unlike  other
-                implementations, ncurses zeros dynamic  variables  before  the
+            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Beginning  with version 6.3, ncurses stores <EM>static</EM> and <EM>dynamic</EM>
+                variables  in  the  same  manner  as   SVr4.    Unlike   other
+                implementations,  ncurses  zeros  dynamic variables before the
                 first <STRONG>%g</STRONG> or <STRONG>%P</STRONG> operator.
 
        <STRONG>%'</STRONG><EM>c</EM><STRONG>'</STRONG> char constant <EM>c</EM>
 
        <STRONG>%?</STRONG> <EM>expr</EM> <STRONG>%t</STRONG> <EM>thenpart</EM> <STRONG>%e</STRONG> <EM>elsepart</EM> <STRONG>%;</STRONG>
             This forms an if-then-else.  The <STRONG>%e</STRONG> <EM>elsepart</EM> is optional.  Usually
-            the <STRONG>%?</STRONG> <EM>expr</EM> part pushes a value onto the stack,  and  <STRONG>%t</STRONG>  pops  it
-            from  the  stack,  testing if it is nonzero (true).  If it is zero
+            the  <STRONG>%?</STRONG>  <EM>expr</EM>  part  pushes a value onto the stack, and <STRONG>%t</STRONG> pops it
+            from the stack, testing if it is nonzero (true).  If  it  is  zero
             (false), control passes to the <STRONG>%e</STRONG> (else) part.
 
             It is possible to form else-if's a la Algol 68:
 
             where ci are conditions, bi are bodies.
 
-            Use the <STRONG>-f</STRONG> option of <STRONG>tic</STRONG> or <STRONG>infocmp</STRONG> to see the  structure  of  if-
+            Use  the  <STRONG>-f</STRONG>  option of <STRONG>tic</STRONG> or <STRONG>infocmp</STRONG> to see the structure of if-
             then-else's.  Some strings, e.g., <STRONG>sgr</STRONG> can be very complicated when
-            written on one line.  The <STRONG>-f</STRONG> option splits the string  into  lines
+            written  on  one line.  The <STRONG>-f</STRONG> option splits the string into lines
             with the parts indented.
 
-       Binary  operations  are  in postfix form with the operands in the usual
-       order.  That is, to get x-5 one  would  use  "%gx%{5}%-".   <STRONG>%P</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>%g</STRONG>
+       Binary operations are in postfix form with the operands  in  the  usual
+       order.   That  is,  to  get  x-5  one would use "%gx%{5}%-".  <STRONG>%P</STRONG> and <STRONG>%g</STRONG>
        variables are persistent across escape-string evaluations.
 
-       Consider  the HP2645, which, to get to row 3 and column 12, needs to be
-       sent \E&amp;a12c03Y padded for 6 milliseconds.  Note that the order of  the
-       rows  and  columns  is  inverted  here, and that the row and column are
-       printed   as   two   digits.     Thus    its    <STRONG>cup</STRONG>    capability    is
+       Consider the HP2645, which, to get to row 3 and column 12, needs to  be
+       sent  \E&amp;a12c03Y padded for 6 milliseconds.  Note that the order of the
+       rows and columns is inverted here, and that  the  row  and  column  are
+       printed    as    two    digits.     Thus    its   <STRONG>cup</STRONG>   capability   is
        "cup=6\E&amp;%p2%2dc%p1%2dY".
 
-       The  Microterm ACT-IV needs the current row and column sent preceded by
-       a  <STRONG>^T</STRONG>,  with  the  row   and   column   simply   encoded   in   binary,
-       "cup=^T%p1%c%p2%c".   Terminals  which  use  "%c"  need  to  be able to
-       backspace the cursor (<STRONG>cub1</STRONG>), and to move the cursor up one line on  the
-       screen  (<STRONG>cuu1</STRONG>).   This  is  necessary  because it is not always safe to
-       transmit <STRONG>\n</STRONG> <STRONG>^D</STRONG> and <STRONG>\r</STRONG>, as the system may change or discard them.   (The
-       library  routines  dealing with terminfo set tty modes so that tabs are
-       never expanded, so \t is safe to send.  This turns out to be  essential
+       The Microterm ACT-IV needs the current row and column sent preceded  by
+       a   <STRONG>^T</STRONG>,   with   the   row   and   column  simply  encoded  in  binary,
+       "cup=^T%p1%c%p2%c".  Terminals which  use  "%c"  need  to  be  able  to
+       backspace  the cursor (<STRONG>cub1</STRONG>), and to move the cursor up one line on the
+       screen (<STRONG>cuu1</STRONG>).  This is necessary because it  is  not  always  safe  to
+       transmit  <STRONG>\n</STRONG> <STRONG>^D</STRONG> and <STRONG>\r</STRONG>, as the system may change or discard them.  (The
+       library routines dealing with terminfo set tty modes so that  tabs  are
+       never  expanded, so \t is safe to send.  This turns out to be essential
        for the Ann Arbor 4080.)
 
-       A  final example is the LSI ADM-3a, which uses row and column offset by
+       A final example is the LSI ADM-3a, which uses row and column offset  by
        a blank character, thus "cup=\E=%p1%' '%+%c%p2%' '%+%c".  After sending
-       "\E=",  this  pushes  the first parameter, pushes the ASCII value for a
+       "\E=", this pushes the first parameter, pushes the ASCII  value  for  a
        space (32), adds them (pushing the sum on the stack in place of the two
-       previous  values) and outputs that value as a character.  Then the same
-       is done for the second parameter.  More complex arithmetic is  possible
+       previous values) and outputs that value as a character.  Then the  same
+       is  done for the second parameter.  More complex arithmetic is possible
        using the stack.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Cursor-Motions">Cursor Motions</a></H3><PRE>
-       If  the  terminal has a fast way to home the cursor (to very upper left
-       corner of screen) then this can be given as <STRONG>home</STRONG>; similarly a fast  way
-       of  getting  to the lower left-hand corner can be given as <STRONG>ll</STRONG>; this may
+       If the terminal has a fast way to home the cursor (to very  upper  left
+       corner  of screen) then this can be given as <STRONG>home</STRONG>; similarly a fast way
+       of getting to the lower left-hand corner can be given as <STRONG>ll</STRONG>;  this  may
        involve going up with <STRONG>cuu1</STRONG> from the home position, but a program should
        never do this itself (unless <STRONG>ll</STRONG> does) because it can make no assumption
-       about the effect of moving up from the home position.   Note  that  the
-       home  position  is  the  same  as  addressing to (0,0): to the top left
-       corner of the screen, not of memory.  (Thus, the  \EH  sequence  on  HP
+       about  the  effect  of moving up from the home position.  Note that the
+       home position is the same as addressing  to  (0,0):  to  the  top  left
+       corner  of  the  screen,  not of memory.  (Thus, the \EH sequence on HP
        terminals cannot be used for <STRONG>home</STRONG>.)
 
        If the terminal has row or column absolute cursor addressing, these can
-       be given as single  parameter  capabilities  <STRONG>hpa</STRONG>  (horizontal  position
-       absolute)  and  <STRONG>vpa</STRONG>  (vertical position absolute).  Sometimes these are
-       shorter than the more general  two  parameter  sequence  (as  with  the
-       hp2645)   and  can  be  used  in  preference  to  <STRONG>cup</STRONG>.   If  there  are
-       parameterized local motions (e.g., move <EM>n</EM> spaces to  the  right)  these
-       can  be  given  as  <STRONG>cud</STRONG>,  <STRONG>cub</STRONG>,  <STRONG>cuf</STRONG>,  and  <STRONG>cuu</STRONG>  with a single parameter
-       indicating how many spaces to move.  These are primarily useful if  the
+       be  given  as  single  parameter  capabilities <STRONG>hpa</STRONG> (horizontal position
+       absolute) and <STRONG>vpa</STRONG> (vertical position absolute).   Sometimes  these  are
+       shorter  than  the  more  general  two  parameter sequence (as with the
+       hp2645)  and  can  be  used  in  preference  to  <STRONG>cup</STRONG>.   If  there   are
+       parameterized  local  motions  (e.g., move <EM>n</EM> spaces to the right) these
+       can be given as  <STRONG>cud</STRONG>,  <STRONG>cub</STRONG>,  <STRONG>cuf</STRONG>,  and  <STRONG>cuu</STRONG>  with  a  single  parameter
+       indicating  how many spaces to move.  These are primarily useful if the
        terminal does not have <STRONG>cup</STRONG>, such as the TEKTRONIX 4025.
 
-       If  the  terminal  needs to be in a special mode when running a program
+       If the terminal needs to be in a special mode when  running  a  program
        that uses these capabilities, the codes to enter and exit this mode can
-       be  given as <STRONG>smcup</STRONG> and <STRONG>rmcup</STRONG>.  This arises, for example, from terminals
-       like the Concept with more than one page of memory.   If  the  terminal
-       has  only  memory  relative  cursor  addressing and not screen relative
-       cursor addressing, a one screen-sized window must  be  fixed  into  the
+       be given as <STRONG>smcup</STRONG> and <STRONG>rmcup</STRONG>.  This arises, for example, from  terminals
+       like  the  Concept  with more than one page of memory.  If the terminal
+       has only memory relative cursor  addressing  and  not  screen  relative
+       cursor  addressing,  a  one  screen-sized window must be fixed into the
        terminal for cursor addressing to work properly.  This is also used for
-       the TEKTRONIX 4025, where <STRONG>smcup</STRONG> sets the command character  to  be  the
-       one  used  by  terminfo.   If  the  <STRONG>smcup</STRONG> sequence will not restore the
-       screen after an <STRONG>rmcup</STRONG>  sequence  is  output  (to  the  state  prior  to
+       the  TEKTRONIX  4025,  where <STRONG>smcup</STRONG> sets the command character to be the
+       one used by terminfo.  If the  <STRONG>smcup</STRONG>  sequence  will  not  restore  the
+       screen  after  an  <STRONG>rmcup</STRONG>  sequence  is  output  (to  the state prior to
        outputting <STRONG>rmcup</STRONG>), specify <STRONG>nrrmc</STRONG>.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Margins">Margins</a></H3><PRE>
-       SVr4  (and  X/Open Curses) list several string capabilities for setting
-       margins.  Two were intended for use with  terminals,  and  another  six
+       SVr4 (and X/Open Curses) list several string capabilities  for  setting
+       margins.   Two  were  intended  for use with terminals, and another six
        were intended for use with printers.
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The two terminal capabilities assume that the terminal may have the
-           capability of setting the left and/or right margin at  the  current
+           capability  of  setting the left and/or right margin at the current
            cursor column position.
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The printer capabilities assume that the printer may have two types
            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   the ability to set a top and/or bottom margin using the current
                line position, and
 
-           <STRONG>o</STRONG>   parameterized  capabilities  for setting the top, bottom, left,
+           <STRONG>o</STRONG>   parameterized capabilities for setting the top,  bottom,  left,
                right margins given the number of rows or columns.
 
-       In practice, the categorization into "terminal" and  "printer"  is  not
+       In  practice,  the  categorization into "terminal" and "printer" is not
        suitable:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The  AT&amp;T  SVr4  terminal  database  uses <STRONG>smgl</STRONG> four times, for AT&amp;T
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The AT&amp;T SVr4 terminal database uses  <STRONG>smgl</STRONG>  four  times,  for  AT&amp;T
            hardware.
 
-           Three of the four are printers.   They  lack  the  ability  to  set
+           Three  of  the  four  are  printers.   They lack the ability to set
            left/right margins by specifying the column.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Other  (non-AT&amp;T) terminals may support margins but using different
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Other (non-AT&amp;T) terminals may support margins but using  different
            assumptions from AT&amp;T.
 
-           For instance, the DEC VT420 supports left/right margins,  but  only
+           For  instance,  the DEC VT420 supports left/right margins, but only
            using a column parameter.  As an added complication, the VT420 uses
-           two settings to fully enable left/right margins (left/right  margin
-           mode,  and  origin  mode).   The  former enables the margins, which
-           causes printed text to wrap  within  margins,  but  the  latter  is
+           two  settings to fully enable left/right margins (left/right margin
+           mode, and origin mode).  The  former  enables  the  margins,  which
+           causes  printed  text  to  wrap  within  margins, but the latter is
            needed to prevent cursor-addressing outside those margins.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Both  DEC  VT420  left/right  margins are set with a single control
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Both DEC VT420 left/right margins are set  with  a  single  control
            sequence.  If either is omitted, the corresponding margin is set to
-           the  left  or  right  edge  of the display (rather than leaving the
+           the left or right edge of the  display  (rather  than  leaving  the
            margin unmodified).
 
        These are the margin-related capabilities:
 
-                    <STRONG>Name</STRONG>       <STRONG>Description</STRONG>
-                    ----------------------------------------------
-                    smgl       Set left margin at current column
-                    smgr       Set right margin at current column
-                    smgb       Set bottom margin at current line
-                    smgt       Set top margin at current line
-                    smgbp      Set bottom margin at line <EM>N</EM>
-                    smglp      Set left margin at column <EM>N</EM>
-                    smgrp      Set right margin at column <EM>N</EM>
-                    smgtp      Set top margin at line <EM>N</EM>
-
-       When writing an application that uses these  string  capabilities,  the
-       pairs  should be first checked to see if each capability in the pair is
+                <STRONG>Name</STRONG>       <STRONG>Description</STRONG>
+                ------------------------------------------------------
+                smgl       Set left margin at current column
+                smgr       Set right margin at current column
+                smgb       Set bottom margin at current line
+                smgt       Set top margin at current line
+                smgbp      Set bottom margin at line <EM>N</EM>
+                smglp      Set left margin at column <EM>N</EM>
+                smgrp      Set right margin at column <EM>N</EM>
+                smgtp      Set top margin at line <EM>N</EM>
+                smglr      Set both left and right margins to <EM>L</EM> and <EM>R</EM>
+                smgtb      Set both top and bottom margins to <EM>T</EM> and <EM>B</EM>
+
+       When  writing  an  application that uses these string capabilities, the
+       pairs should be first checked to see if each capability in the pair  is
        set or only one is set:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If both <STRONG>smglp</STRONG> and <STRONG>smgrp</STRONG>  are  set,  each  is  used  with  a  single
-           argument,  <EM>N</EM>,  that  gives  the column number of the left and right
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If  both  <STRONG>smglp</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>smgrp</STRONG>  are  set,  each  is used with a single
+           argument, <EM>N</EM>, that gives the column number of  the  left  and  right
            margin, respectively.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If both <STRONG>smgtp</STRONG> and <STRONG>smgbp</STRONG> are set, each is used to set  the  top  and
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If  both  <STRONG>smgtp</STRONG>  and <STRONG>smgbp</STRONG> are set, each is used to set the top and
            bottom margin, respectively:
 
            <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>smgtp</STRONG> is used with a single argument, <EM>N</EM>, the line number of the
                top margin.
 
-           <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>smgbp</STRONG> is used with two arguments, <EM>N</EM> and <EM>M</EM>, that give  the  line
+           <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>smgbp</STRONG>  is  used with two arguments, <EM>N</EM> and <EM>M</EM>, that give the line
                number of the bottom margin, the first counting from the top of
-               the page  and  the  second  counting  from  the  bottom.   This
-               accommodates  the two styles of specifying the bottom margin in
+               the  page  and  the  second  counting  from  the  bottom.  This
+               accommodates the two styles of specifying the bottom margin  in
                different manufacturers' printers.
 
-           When designing a terminfo entry for a printer that has  a  settable
-           bottom  margin,  only  the first or second argument should be used,
+           When  designing  a terminfo entry for a printer that has a settable
+           bottom margin, only the first or second argument  should  be  used,
            depending on the printer.  When developing an application that uses
            <STRONG>smgbp</STRONG> to set the bottom margin, both arguments must be given.
 
        Conversely, when only one capability in the pair is set:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If  only  one  of  <STRONG>smglp</STRONG> and <STRONG>smgrp</STRONG> is set, then it is used with two
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If only one of <STRONG>smglp</STRONG> and <STRONG>smgrp</STRONG> is set, then it  is  used  with  two
            arguments, the column number of the left and right margins, in that
            order.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Likewise,  if  only  one of <STRONG>smgtp</STRONG> and <STRONG>smgbp</STRONG> is set, then it is used
-           with two arguments that give the top and bottom  margins,  in  that
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Likewise, if only one of <STRONG>smgtp</STRONG> and <STRONG>smgbp</STRONG> is set, then  it  is  used
+           with  two  arguments  that give the top and bottom margins, in that
            order, counting from the top of the page.
 
            When designing a terminfo entry for a printer that requires setting
-           both left and right or top and bottom margins simultaneously,  only
-           one  capability  in  the  pairs  <STRONG>smglp</STRONG> and <STRONG>smgrp</STRONG> or <STRONG>smgtp</STRONG> and <STRONG>smgbp</STRONG>
+           both  left and right or top and bottom margins simultaneously, only
+           one capability in the pairs <STRONG>smglp</STRONG> and  <STRONG>smgrp</STRONG>  or  <STRONG>smgtp</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>smgbp</STRONG>
            should be defined, leaving the other unset.
 
+       Except  for  very  old terminal descriptions, e.g., those developed for
+       SVr4, the scheme just described  should  be  considered  obsolete.   An
+       improved set of capabilities was added late in the SVr4 releases (<STRONG>smglr</STRONG>
+       and <STRONG>smgtb</STRONG>),  which  explicitly  use  two  parameters  for  setting  the
+       left/right or top/bottom margins.
+
        When setting margins, the line- and column-values are zero-based.
 
-       The <STRONG>mgc</STRONG> string capability should  be  defined.   Applications  such  as
+       The  <STRONG>mgc</STRONG>  string  capability  should  be defined.  Applications such as
        <STRONG><A HREF="tabs.1.html">tabs(1)</A></STRONG> rely upon this to reset all margins.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Area-Clears">Area Clears</a></H3><PRE>
-       If  the  terminal can clear from the current position to the end of the
-       line, leaving the cursor where it is, this should be given as  <STRONG>el</STRONG>.   If
-       the  terminal  can  clear from the beginning of the line to the current
-       position inclusive, leaving the cursor where  it  is,  this  should  be
-       given  as  <STRONG>el1</STRONG>.  If the terminal can clear from the current position to
-       the end of the display, then this should be given as <STRONG>ed</STRONG>.   <STRONG>Ed</STRONG>  is  only
+       If the terminal can clear from the current position to the end  of  the
+       line,  leaving  the cursor where it is, this should be given as <STRONG>el</STRONG>.  If
+       the terminal can clear from the beginning of the line  to  the  current
+       position  inclusive,  leaving  the  cursor  where it is, this should be
+       given as <STRONG>el1</STRONG>.  If the terminal can clear from the current  position  to
+       the  end  of  the display, then this should be given as <STRONG>ed</STRONG>.  <STRONG>Ed</STRONG> is only
        defined from the first column of a line.  (Thus, it can be simulated by
-       a request to delete a large number of  lines,  if  a  true  <STRONG>ed</STRONG>  is  not
+       a  request  to  delete  a  large  number  of lines, if a true <STRONG>ed</STRONG> is not
        available.)
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Insert_delete-line-and-vertical-motions">Insert/delete line and vertical motions</a></H3><PRE>
-       If  the  terminal  can  open a new blank line before the line where the
-       cursor is, this should be given as <STRONG>il1</STRONG>; this  is  done  only  from  the
-       first  position  of  a  line.  The cursor must then appear on the newly
-       blank line.  If the terminal can delete the line which  the  cursor  is
-       on,  then this should be given as <STRONG>dl1</STRONG>; this is done only from the first
+       If the terminal can open a new blank line before  the  line  where  the
+       cursor  is,  this  should  be  given as <STRONG>il1</STRONG>; this is done only from the
+       first position of a line.  The cursor must then  appear  on  the  newly
+       blank  line.   If  the terminal can delete the line which the cursor is
+       on, then this should be given as <STRONG>dl1</STRONG>; this is done only from the  first
        position on the line to be deleted.  Versions of <STRONG>il1</STRONG> and <STRONG>dl1</STRONG> which take
        a single parameter and insert or delete that many lines can be given as
        <STRONG>il</STRONG> and <STRONG>dl</STRONG>.
 
-       If the terminal has a settable scrolling region (like  the  vt100)  the
-       command  to  set  this  can be described with the <STRONG>csr</STRONG> capability, which
+       If  the  terminal  has a settable scrolling region (like the vt100) the
+       command to set this can be described with  the  <STRONG>csr</STRONG>  capability,  which
        takes two parameters: the top and bottom lines of the scrolling region.
        The cursor position is, alas, undefined after using this command.
 
-       It  is possible to get the effect of insert or delete line using <STRONG>csr</STRONG> on
-       a properly chosen region; the <STRONG>sc</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>rc</STRONG>  (save  and  restore  cursor)
+       It is possible to get the effect of insert or delete line using <STRONG>csr</STRONG>  on
+       a  properly  chosen  region;  the  <STRONG>sc</STRONG>  and <STRONG>rc</STRONG> (save and restore cursor)
        commands may be useful for ensuring that your synthesized insert/delete
-       string does not move the cursor.  (Note that  the  <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">ncurses(3x)</A></STRONG>  library
-       does   this   synthesis   automatically,   so   you  need  not  compose
+       string  does  not  move the cursor.  (Note that the <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">ncurses(3x)</A></STRONG> library
+       does  this  synthesis  automatically,   so   you   need   not   compose
        insert/delete strings for an entry with <STRONG>csr</STRONG>).
 
-       Yet another way to construct insert  and  delete  might  be  to  use  a
-       combination  of  index  with  the  memory-lock  feature  found  on some
-       terminals  (like  the  HP-700/90  series,  which   however   also   has
+       Yet  another  way  to  construct  insert  and  delete might be to use a
+       combination of  index  with  the  memory-lock  feature  found  on  some
+       terminals   (like   the   HP-700/90  series,  which  however  also  has
        insert/delete).
 
-       Inserting  lines  at  the  top or bottom of the screen can also be done
-       using <STRONG>ri</STRONG> or <STRONG>ind</STRONG> on many terminals without a  true  insert/delete  line,
+       Inserting lines at the top or bottom of the screen  can  also  be  done
+       using  <STRONG>ri</STRONG>  or  <STRONG>ind</STRONG> on many terminals without a true insert/delete line,
        and is often faster even on terminals with those features.
 
-       The  boolean  <STRONG>non_dest_scroll_region</STRONG>  should  be  set if each scrolling
-       window is effectively a view port on a screen-sized  canvas.   To  test
-       for  this  capability,  create  a scrolling region in the middle of the
-       screen, write something to the bottom line, move the cursor to the  top
-       of  the region, and do <STRONG>ri</STRONG> followed by <STRONG>dl1</STRONG> or <STRONG>ind</STRONG>.  If the data scrolled
-       off the bottom of the region by the <STRONG>ri</STRONG> re-appears,  then  scrolling  is
-       non-destructive.   System  V  and XSI Curses expect that <STRONG>ind</STRONG>, <STRONG>ri</STRONG>, <STRONG>indn</STRONG>,
+       The boolean <STRONG>non_dest_scroll_region</STRONG> should  be  set  if  each  scrolling
+       window  is  effectively  a view port on a screen-sized canvas.  To test
+       for this capability, create a scrolling region in  the  middle  of  the
+       screen,  write something to the bottom line, move the cursor to the top
+       of the region, and do <STRONG>ri</STRONG> followed by <STRONG>dl1</STRONG> or <STRONG>ind</STRONG>.  If the data  scrolled
+       off  the  bottom  of the region by the <STRONG>ri</STRONG> re-appears, then scrolling is
+       non-destructive.  System V and XSI Curses expect that  <STRONG>ind</STRONG>,  <STRONG>ri</STRONG>,  <STRONG>indn</STRONG>,
        and  <STRONG>rin</STRONG>  will  simulate  destructive  scrolling;  their  documentation
-       cautions  you  not  to  define  <STRONG>csr</STRONG>  unless  this is true.  This <STRONG>curses</STRONG>
-       implementation is more  liberal  and  will  do  explicit  erases  after
+       cautions you not to define  <STRONG>csr</STRONG>  unless  this  is  true.   This  <STRONG>curses</STRONG>
+       implementation  is  more  liberal  and  will  do  explicit erases after
        scrolling if <STRONG>ndsrc</STRONG> is defined.
 
-       If  the  terminal has the ability to define a window as part of memory,
-       which all commands affect, it should  be  given  as  the  parameterized
-       string  <STRONG>wind</STRONG>.  The four parameters are the starting and ending lines in
+       If the terminal has the ability to define a window as part  of  memory,
+       which  all  commands  affect,  it  should be given as the parameterized
+       string <STRONG>wind</STRONG>.  The four parameters are the starting and ending lines  in
        memory and the starting and ending columns in memory, in that order.
 
        If the terminal can retain display memory above, then the <STRONG>da</STRONG> capability
-       should  be  given;  if  display  memory  can be retained below, then <STRONG>db</STRONG>
-       should be given.  These indicate that deleting a line or scrolling  may
-       bring  non-blank lines up from below or that scrolling back with <STRONG>ri</STRONG> may
+       should be given; if display memory  can  be  retained  below,  then  <STRONG>db</STRONG>
+       should  be given.  These indicate that deleting a line or scrolling may
+       bring non-blank lines up from below or that scrolling back with <STRONG>ri</STRONG>  may
        bring down non-blank lines.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Insert_Delete-Character">Insert/Delete Character</a></H3><PRE>
-       There are two basic kinds of  intelligent  terminals  with  respect  to
-       insert/delete  character  which  can  be described using <EM>terminfo.</EM>  The
-       most  common  insert/delete  character  operations  affect   only   the
-       characters  on the current line and shift characters off the end of the
-       line rigidly.  Other terminals, such as the Concept 100 and the  Perkin
-       Elmer  Owl,  make a distinction between typed and untyped blanks on the
-       screen, shifting upon an insert or delete only to an untyped  blank  on
-       the  screen  which  is  either  eliminated,  or expanded to two untyped
+       There  are  two  basic  kinds  of intelligent terminals with respect to
+       insert/delete character which can be  described  using  <EM>terminfo.</EM>   The
+       most   common   insert/delete  character  operations  affect  only  the
+       characters on the current line and shift characters off the end of  the
+       line  rigidly.  Other terminals, such as the Concept 100 and the Perkin
+       Elmer Owl, make a distinction between typed and untyped blanks  on  the
+       screen,  shifting  upon an insert or delete only to an untyped blank on
+       the screen which is either  eliminated,  or  expanded  to  two  untyped
        blanks.
 
-       You can determine the kind of terminal you have by clearing the  screen
-       and  then  typing  text separated by cursor motions.  Type "abc    def"
-       using local cursor motions (not  spaces)  between  the  "abc"  and  the
-       "def".   Then position the cursor before the "abc" and put the terminal
-       in insert mode.  If typing characters causes the rest of  the  line  to
-       shift  rigidly  and  characters to fall off the end, then your terminal
-       does not distinguish between blanks  and  untyped  positions.   If  the
-       "abc"  shifts over to the "def" which then move together around the end
-       of the current line and onto the next  as  you  insert,  you  have  the
-       second  type  of  terminal,  and  should  give the capability <STRONG>in</STRONG>, which
+       You  can determine the kind of terminal you have by clearing the screen
+       and then typing text separated by cursor  motions.   Type  "abc    def"
+       using  local  cursor  motions  (not  spaces)  between the "abc" and the
+       "def".  Then position the cursor before the "abc" and put the  terminal
+       in  insert  mode.   If typing characters causes the rest of the line to
+       shift rigidly and characters to fall off the end,  then  your  terminal
+       does  not  distinguish  between  blanks  and untyped positions.  If the
+       "abc" shifts over to the "def" which then move together around the  end
+       of  the  current  line  and  onto  the next as you insert, you have the
+       second type of terminal, and  should  give  the  capability  <STRONG>in</STRONG>,  which
        stands for "insert null".
 
-       While these are two logically  separate  attributes  (one  line  versus
-       multi-line  insert  mode,  and  special treatment of untyped spaces) we
-       have seen no terminals whose insert mode cannot be described  with  the
+       While  these  are  two  logically  separate attributes (one line versus
+       multi-line insert mode, and special treatment  of  untyped  spaces)  we
+       have  seen  no terminals whose insert mode cannot be described with the
        single attribute.
 
-       Terminfo  can  describe  both  terminals which have an insert mode, and
-       terminals which send a simple sequence to open a blank position on  the
+       Terminfo can describe both terminals which have  an  insert  mode,  and
+       terminals  which send a simple sequence to open a blank position on the
        current line.  Give as <STRONG>smir</STRONG> the sequence to get into insert mode.  Give
-       as <STRONG>rmir</STRONG> the sequence to leave  insert  mode.   Now  give  as  <STRONG>ich1</STRONG>  any
-       sequence  needed  to  be  sent  just before sending the character to be
-       inserted.  Most terminals with a true insert mode will not  give  <STRONG>ich1</STRONG>;
-       terminals  which  send a sequence to open a screen position should give
+       as  <STRONG>rmir</STRONG>  the  sequence  to  leave  insert  mode.  Now give as <STRONG>ich1</STRONG> any
+       sequence needed to be sent just before  sending  the  character  to  be
+       inserted.   Most  terminals with a true insert mode will not give <STRONG>ich1</STRONG>;
+       terminals which send a sequence to open a screen position  should  give
        it here.
 
-       If your terminal has both, insert mode is usually preferable  to  <STRONG>ich1</STRONG>.
-       Technically,  you  should  not  give  both unless the terminal actually
-       requires both to be used in combination.  Accordingly, some  non-curses
-       applications  get  confused if both are present; the symptom is doubled
-       characters in an update using insert.  This requirement  is  now  rare;
-       most  <STRONG>ich</STRONG>  sequences do not require previous smir, and most smir insert
-       modes do not require <STRONG>ich1</STRONG> before each character.   Therefore,  the  new
-       <STRONG>curses</STRONG>  actually  assumes this is the case and uses either <STRONG>rmir</STRONG>/<STRONG>smir</STRONG> or
-       <STRONG>ich</STRONG>/<STRONG>ich1</STRONG> as appropriate (but not both).  If you have to write an  entry
-       to  be  used  under  new curses for a terminal old enough to need both,
+       If  your  terminal has both, insert mode is usually preferable to <STRONG>ich1</STRONG>.
+       Technically, you should not give  both  unless  the  terminal  actually
+       requires  both to be used in combination.  Accordingly, some non-curses
+       applications get confused if both are present; the symptom  is  doubled
+       characters  in  an  update using insert.  This requirement is now rare;
+       most <STRONG>ich</STRONG> sequences do not require previous smir, and most  smir  insert
+       modes  do  not  require <STRONG>ich1</STRONG> before each character.  Therefore, the new
+       <STRONG>curses</STRONG> actually assumes this is the case and uses either  <STRONG>rmir</STRONG>/<STRONG>smir</STRONG>  or
+       <STRONG>ich</STRONG>/<STRONG>ich1</STRONG>  as appropriate (but not both).  If you have to write an entry
+       to be used under new curses for a terminal old  enough  to  need  both,
        include the <STRONG>rmir</STRONG>/<STRONG>smir</STRONG> sequences in <STRONG>ich1</STRONG>.
 
        If post insert padding is needed, give this as a number of milliseconds
-       in  <STRONG>ip</STRONG> (a string option).  Any other sequence which may need to be sent
+       in <STRONG>ip</STRONG> (a string option).  Any other sequence which may need to be  sent
        after an insert of a single character may also be given in <STRONG>ip</STRONG>.  If your
-       terminal  needs  both  to be placed into an "insert mode" and a special
-       code to precede each inserted character, then both <STRONG>smir</STRONG>/<STRONG>rmir</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>ich1</STRONG>
-       can  be  given,  and  both  will be used.  The <STRONG>ich</STRONG> capability, with one
+       terminal needs both to be placed into an "insert mode"  and  a  special
+       code  to  precede each inserted character, then both <STRONG>smir</STRONG>/<STRONG>rmir</STRONG> and <STRONG>ich1</STRONG>
+       can be given, and both will be used.   The  <STRONG>ich</STRONG>  capability,  with  one
        parameter, <EM>n</EM>, will repeat the effects of <STRONG>ich1</STRONG> <EM>n</EM> times.
 
-       If padding is necessary between characters typed while  not  in  insert
+       If  padding  is  necessary between characters typed while not in insert
        mode, give this as a number of milliseconds padding in <STRONG>rmp</STRONG>.
 
-       It  is  occasionally  necessary  to move around while in insert mode to
-       delete characters on the same line (e.g., if there is a tab  after  the
-       insertion  position).   If  your terminal allows motion while in insert
-       mode you can give the capability <STRONG>mir</STRONG> to  speed  up  inserting  in  this
-       case.   Omitting  <STRONG>mir</STRONG>  will affect only speed.  Some terminals (notably
-       Datamedia's) must not have <STRONG>mir</STRONG> because of the  way  their  insert  mode
+       It is occasionally necessary to move around while  in  insert  mode  to
+       delete  characters  on the same line (e.g., if there is a tab after the
+       insertion position).  If your terminal allows motion  while  in  insert
+       mode  you  can  give  the  capability <STRONG>mir</STRONG> to speed up inserting in this
+       case.  Omitting <STRONG>mir</STRONG> will affect only speed.   Some  terminals  (notably
+       Datamedia's)  must  not  have  <STRONG>mir</STRONG> because of the way their insert mode
        works.
 
-       Finally,  you  can  specify <STRONG>dch1</STRONG> to delete a single character, <STRONG>dch</STRONG> with
-       one parameter, <EM>n</EM>, to delete <EM>n</EM> <EM>characters,</EM> and  delete  mode  by  giving
-       <STRONG>smdc</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>rmdc</STRONG>  to  enter  and exit delete mode (any mode the terminal
+       Finally, you can specify <STRONG>dch1</STRONG> to delete a single  character,  <STRONG>dch</STRONG>  with
+       one  parameter,  <EM>n</EM>,  to  delete <EM>n</EM> <EM>characters,</EM> and delete mode by giving
+       <STRONG>smdc</STRONG> and <STRONG>rmdc</STRONG> to enter and exit delete  mode  (any  mode  the  terminal
        needs to be placed in for <STRONG>dch1</STRONG> to work).
 
-       A command to erase <EM>n</EM> characters  (equivalent  to  outputting  <EM>n</EM>  blanks
+       A  command  to  erase  <EM>n</EM>  characters (equivalent to outputting <EM>n</EM> blanks
        without moving the cursor) can be given as <STRONG>ech</STRONG> with one parameter.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Highlighting_-Underlining_-and-Visible-Bells">Highlighting, Underlining, and Visible Bells</a></H3><PRE>
        If your terminal has one or more kinds of display attributes, these can
-       be represented in a number of different ways.  You  should  choose  one
-       display  form  as  <EM>standout</EM>  <EM>mode</EM>,  representing a good, high contrast,
-       easy-on-the-eyes, format for  highlighting  error  messages  and  other
-       attention  getters.   (If  you  have a choice, reverse video plus half-
-       bright is good, or reverse video alone.)  The sequences  to  enter  and
-       exit  standout  mode  are given as <STRONG>smso</STRONG> and <STRONG>rmso</STRONG>, respectively.  If the
-       code to change into or out of standout mode  leaves  one  or  even  two
-       blank  spaces  on  the screen, as the TVI 912 and Teleray 1061 do, then
+       be  represented  in  a number of different ways.  You should choose one
+       display form as <EM>standout</EM> <EM>mode</EM>,  representing  a  good,  high  contrast,
+       easy-on-the-eyes,  format  for  highlighting  error  messages and other
+       attention getters.  (If you have a choice,  reverse  video  plus  half-
+       bright  is  good,  or reverse video alone.)  The sequences to enter and
+       exit standout mode are given as <STRONG>smso</STRONG> and <STRONG>rmso</STRONG>,  respectively.   If  the
+       code  to  change  into  or  out of standout mode leaves one or even two
+       blank spaces on the screen, as the TVI 912 and Teleray  1061  do,  then
        <STRONG>xmc</STRONG> should be given to tell how many spaces are left.
 
        Codes to begin underlining and end underlining can be given as <STRONG>smul</STRONG> and
        <STRONG>rmul</STRONG> respectively.  If the terminal has a code to underline the current
-       character and move the cursor one space  to  the  right,  such  as  the
+       character  and  move  the  cursor  one  space to the right, such as the
        Microterm Mime, this can be given as <STRONG>uc</STRONG>.
 
-       Other  capabilities  to  enter various highlighting modes include <STRONG>blink</STRONG>
-       (blinking) <STRONG>bold</STRONG> (bold or extra bright) <STRONG>dim</STRONG> (dim or  half-bright)  <STRONG>invis</STRONG>
-       (blanking  or invisible text) <STRONG>prot</STRONG> (protected) <STRONG>rev</STRONG> (reverse video) <STRONG>sgr0</STRONG>
-       (turn off <EM>all</EM> attribute modes) <STRONG>smacs</STRONG>  (enter  alternate  character  set
+       Other capabilities to enter various highlighting  modes  include  <STRONG>blink</STRONG>
+       (blinking)  <STRONG>bold</STRONG>  (bold or extra bright) <STRONG>dim</STRONG> (dim or half-bright) <STRONG>invis</STRONG>
+       (blanking or invisible text) <STRONG>prot</STRONG> (protected) <STRONG>rev</STRONG> (reverse video)  <STRONG>sgr0</STRONG>
+       (turn  off  <EM>all</EM>  attribute  modes) <STRONG>smacs</STRONG> (enter alternate character set
        mode) and <STRONG>rmacs</STRONG> (exit alternate character set mode).  Turning on any of
        these modes singly may or may not turn off other modes.
 
-       If there is a sequence to set arbitrary  combinations  of  modes,  this
-       should  be  given  as  <STRONG>sgr</STRONG> (set attributes), taking 9 parameters.  Each
-       parameter is either 0 or nonzero, as the corresponding attribute is  on
-       or  off.  The 9 parameters are, in order: standout, underline, reverse,
-       blink, dim, bold, blank, protect, alternate  character  set.   Not  all
-       modes  need  be  supported  by  <STRONG>sgr</STRONG>, only those for which corresponding
+       If  there  is  a  sequence to set arbitrary combinations of modes, this
+       should be given as <STRONG>sgr</STRONG> (set attributes),  taking  9  parameters.   Each
+       parameter  is either 0 or nonzero, as the corresponding attribute is on
+       or off.  The 9 parameters are, in order: standout, underline,  reverse,
+       blink,  dim,  bold,  blank,  protect, alternate character set.  Not all
+       modes need be supported by <STRONG>sgr</STRONG>,  only  those  for  which  corresponding
        separate attribute commands exist.
 
        For example, the DEC vt220 supports most of the modes:
                <STRONG>tparm</STRONG> <STRONG>parameter</STRONG>      <STRONG>attribute</STRONG>        <STRONG>escape</STRONG> <STRONG>sequence</STRONG>
 
                none                 none             \E[0m
-
                p1                   standout         \E[0;1;7m
                p2                   underline        \E[0;4m
                p3                   reverse          \E[0;7m
                p8                   protect          not used
                p9                   altcharset       ^O (off) ^N (on)
 
-       We begin each escape sequence by turning off any existing modes,  since
-       there  is  no quick way to determine whether they are active.  Standout
-       is set up to be  the  combination  of  reverse  and  bold.   The  vt220
-       terminal  has  a  protect  mode,  though it is not commonly used in sgr
-       because it protects characters on the screen from the host's  erasures.
-       The  altcharset  mode  also is different in that it is either ^O or ^N,
-       depending on whether it is off or on.  If all modes are turned on,  the
+       We  begin each escape sequence by turning off any existing modes, since
+       there is no quick way to determine whether they are  active.   Standout
+       is  set  up  to  be  the  combination  of  reverse and bold.  The vt220
+       terminal has a protect mode, though it is  not  commonly  used  in  sgr
+       because  it protects characters on the screen from the host's erasures.
+       The altcharset mode also is different in that it is either  ^O  or  ^N,
+       depending  on whether it is off or on.  If all modes are turned on, the
        resulting sequence is \E[0;1;4;5;7;8m^N.
 
-       Some  sequences  are  common  to  different  modes.  For example, ;7 is
-       output when either p1 or p3 is true, that is,  if  either  standout  or
+       Some sequences are common to  different  modes.   For  example,  ;7  is
+       output  when  either  p1  or p3 is true, that is, if either standout or
        reverse modes are turned on.
 
        Writing out the above sequences, along with their dependencies yields
            sgr=\E[0%?%p1%p6%|%t;1%;%?%p2%t;4%;%?%p4%t;5%;
                %?%p1%p3%|%t;7%;%?%p7%t;8%;m%?%p9%t\016%e\017%;,
 
-       Remember  that  if  you specify sgr, you must also specify sgr0.  Also,
-       some implementations rely on sgr  being  given  if  sgr0  is,  Not  all
+       Remember that if you specify sgr, you must also  specify  sgr0.   Also,
+       some  implementations  rely  on  sgr  being  given  if sgr0 is, Not all
        terminfo  entries  necessarily  have  an  sgr  string,  however.   Many
-       terminfo entries are derived from termcap entries  which  have  no  sgr
+       terminfo  entries  are  derived  from termcap entries which have no sgr
        string.  The only drawback to adding an sgr string is that termcap also
        assumes that sgr0 does not exit alternate character set mode.
 
-       Terminals  with  the  "magic  cookie"  glitch  (<STRONG>xmc</STRONG>)  deposit   special
-       "cookies"  when  they  receive mode-setting sequences, which affect the
-       display algorithm rather than having extra  bits  for  each  character.
-       Some  terminals, such as the HP 2621, automatically leave standout mode
-       when they move to a new line or  the  cursor  is  addressed.   Programs
-       using  standout mode should exit standout mode before moving the cursor
-       or sending a newline, unless the <STRONG>msgr</STRONG> capability, asserting that it  is
+       Terminals   with  the  "magic  cookie"  glitch  (<STRONG>xmc</STRONG>)  deposit  special
+       "cookies" when they receive mode-setting sequences,  which  affect  the
+       display  algorithm  rather  than  having extra bits for each character.
+       Some terminals, such as the HP 2621, automatically leave standout  mode
+       when  they  move  to  a  new line or the cursor is addressed.  Programs
+       using standout mode should exit standout mode before moving the  cursor
+       or  sending a newline, unless the <STRONG>msgr</STRONG> capability, asserting that it is
        safe to move in standout mode, is present.
 
-       If  the  terminal has a way of flashing the screen to indicate an error
-       quietly (a bell replacement) then this can be given as <STRONG>flash</STRONG>;  it  must
+       If the terminal has a way of flashing the screen to indicate  an  error
+       quietly  (a  bell replacement) then this can be given as <STRONG>flash</STRONG>; it must
        not move the cursor.
 
-       If  the cursor needs to be made more visible than normal when it is not
+       If the cursor needs to be made more visible than normal when it is  not
        on the bottom line (to make, for example, a non-blinking underline into
-       an  easier  to  find block or blinking underline) give this sequence as
+       an easier to find block or blinking underline) give  this  sequence  as
        <STRONG>cvvis</STRONG>.  If there is a way to make the cursor completely invisible, give
-       that  as  <STRONG>civis</STRONG>.  The capability <STRONG>cnorm</STRONG> should be given which undoes the
+       that as <STRONG>civis</STRONG>.  The capability <STRONG>cnorm</STRONG> should be given which  undoes  the
        effects of both of these modes.
 
-       If your terminal correctly generates  underlined  characters  (with  no
-       special  codes  needed)  even  though  it does not overstrike, then you
-       should give the capability <STRONG>ul</STRONG>.  If  a  character  overstriking  another
-       leaves  both  characters  on the screen, specify the capability <STRONG>os</STRONG>.  If
+       If  your  terminal  correctly  generates underlined characters (with no
+       special codes needed) even though it  does  not  overstrike,  then  you
+       should  give  the  capability  <STRONG>ul</STRONG>.  If a character overstriking another
+       leaves both characters on the screen, specify the  capability  <STRONG>os</STRONG>.   If
        overstrikes are erasable with a blank, then this should be indicated by
        giving <STRONG>eo</STRONG>.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Keypad-and-Function-Keys">Keypad and Function Keys</a></H3><PRE>
-       If  the  terminal  has  a keypad that transmits codes when the keys are
-       pressed, this information can be given.  Note that it is  not  possible
+       If the terminal has a keypad that transmits codes  when  the  keys  are
+       pressed,  this  information can be given.  Note that it is not possible
        to handle terminals where the keypad only works in local (this applies,
-       for example, to the unshifted HP 2621 keys).  If the keypad can be  set
-       to  transmit  or  not  transmit,  give  these  codes  as <STRONG>smkx</STRONG> and <STRONG>rmkx</STRONG>.
+       for  example, to the unshifted HP 2621 keys).  If the keypad can be set
+       to transmit or not  transmit,  give  these  codes  as  <STRONG>smkx</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>rmkx</STRONG>.
        Otherwise the keypad is assumed to always transmit.
 
-       The codes sent by the left arrow, right arrow, up  arrow,  down  arrow,
-       and  home  keys  can  be given as <STRONG>kcub1,</STRONG> <STRONG>kcuf1,</STRONG> <STRONG>kcuu1,</STRONG> <STRONG>kcud1,</STRONG> and <STRONG>khome</STRONG>
+       The  codes  sent  by the left arrow, right arrow, up arrow, down arrow,
+       and home keys can be given as <STRONG>kcub1,</STRONG> <STRONG>kcuf1,</STRONG>  <STRONG>kcuu1,</STRONG>  <STRONG>kcud1,</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>khome</STRONG>
        respectively.  If there are function keys such as f0, f1, ..., f10, the
-       codes  they  send  can  be given as <STRONG>kf0,</STRONG> <STRONG>kf1,</STRONG> <STRONG>...,</STRONG> <STRONG>kf10</STRONG>.  If these keys
-       have labels other than the default f0 through f10, the  labels  can  be
+       codes they send can be given as <STRONG>kf0,</STRONG> <STRONG>kf1,</STRONG> <STRONG>...,</STRONG>  <STRONG>kf10</STRONG>.   If  these  keys
+       have  labels  other  than the default f0 through f10, the labels can be
        given as <STRONG>lf0,</STRONG> <STRONG>lf1,</STRONG> <STRONG>...,</STRONG> <STRONG>lf10</STRONG>.
 
        The codes transmitted by certain other special keys can be given:
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>khts</STRONG> (set a tab stop in this column).
 
-       In  addition,  if  the  keypad has a 3 by 3 array of keys including the
-       four arrow keys, the other five keys can be given  as  <STRONG>ka1</STRONG>,  <STRONG>ka3</STRONG>,  <STRONG>kb2</STRONG>,
-       <STRONG>kc1</STRONG>,  and  <STRONG>kc3</STRONG>.   These  keys  are  useful when the effects of a 3 by 3
+       In addition, if the keypad has a 3 by 3 array  of  keys  including  the
+       four  arrow  keys,  the  other five keys can be given as <STRONG>ka1</STRONG>, <STRONG>ka3</STRONG>, <STRONG>kb2</STRONG>,
+       <STRONG>kc1</STRONG>, and <STRONG>kc3</STRONG>.  These keys are useful when the  effects  of  a  3  by  3
        directional pad are needed.
 
        Strings to program function keys can be given as <STRONG>pfkey</STRONG>, <STRONG>pfloc</STRONG>, and <STRONG>pfx</STRONG>.
-       A  string to program screen labels should be specified as <STRONG>pln</STRONG>.  Each of
-       these strings takes two parameters: the function key number to  program
+       A string to program screen labels should be specified as <STRONG>pln</STRONG>.  Each  of
+       these  strings takes two parameters: the function key number to program
        (from 0 to 10) and the string to program it with.  Function key numbers
-       out of this range may program undefined keys in  a  terminal  dependent
-       manner.   The  difference between the capabilities is that <STRONG>pfkey</STRONG> causes
-       pressing the given key to be the same as  the  user  typing  the  given
-       string;  <STRONG>pfloc</STRONG>  causes  the  string  to  be executed by the terminal in
+       out  of  this  range may program undefined keys in a terminal dependent
+       manner.  The difference between the capabilities is that  <STRONG>pfkey</STRONG>  causes
+       pressing  the  given  key  to  be the same as the user typing the given
+       string; <STRONG>pfloc</STRONG> causes the string to  be  executed  by  the  terminal  in
        local; and <STRONG>pfx</STRONG> causes the string to be transmitted to the computer.
 
-       The capabilities <STRONG>nlab</STRONG>, <STRONG>lw</STRONG> and <STRONG>lh</STRONG>  define  the  number  of  programmable
-       screen  labels  and  their  width and height.  If there are commands to
-       turn the labels on and off, give  them  in  <STRONG>smln</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>rmln</STRONG>.   <STRONG>smln</STRONG>  is
-       normally  output  after one or more pln sequences to make sure that the
+       The  capabilities  <STRONG>nlab</STRONG>,  <STRONG>lw</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>lh</STRONG> define the number of programmable
+       screen labels and their width and height.  If  there  are  commands  to
+       turn  the  labels  on  and  off,  give  them in <STRONG>smln</STRONG> and <STRONG>rmln</STRONG>.  <STRONG>smln</STRONG> is
+       normally output after one or more pln sequences to make sure  that  the
        change becomes visible.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Tabs-and-Initialization">Tabs and Initialization</a></H3><PRE>
        A few capabilities are used only for tabs:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If the terminal has hardware tabs, the command to  advance  to  the
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If  the  terminal  has hardware tabs, the command to advance to the
            next tab stop can be given as <STRONG>ht</STRONG> (usually control/I).
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   A "back-tab" command which moves leftward to the preceding tab stop
            can be given as <STRONG>cbt</STRONG>.
 
-           By convention, if the teletype modes indicate that tabs  are  being
-           expanded  by  the  computer rather than being sent to the terminal,
-           programs should not use <STRONG>ht</STRONG> or <STRONG>cbt</STRONG> even if they are  present,  since
+           By  convention,  if the teletype modes indicate that tabs are being
+           expanded by the computer rather than being sent  to  the  terminal,
+           programs  should  not use <STRONG>ht</STRONG> or <STRONG>cbt</STRONG> even if they are present, since
            the user may not have the tab stops properly set.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If  the  terminal has hardware tabs which are initially set every <EM>n</EM>
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If the terminal has hardware tabs which are initially set  every  <EM>n</EM>
            spaces when the terminal is powered up, the numeric parameter <STRONG>it</STRONG> is
            given, showing the number of spaces the tabs are set to.
 
            The <STRONG>it</STRONG> capability is normally used by the <STRONG>tset</STRONG> command to determine
-           whether to set the mode for hardware tab expansion, and whether  to
+           whether  to set the mode for hardware tab expansion, and whether to
            set the tab stops.  If the terminal has tab stops that can be saved
-           in non-volatile memory, the terminfo description  can  assume  that
+           in  non-volatile  memory,  the terminfo description can assume that
            they are properly set.
 
        Other capabilities include
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>is1</STRONG>, <STRONG>is2</STRONG>, and <STRONG>is3</STRONG>, initialization strings for the terminal,
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>,  the  path  name  of  a  program to be run to initialize the
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>, the path name of a program  to  be  run  to  initialize  the
            terminal,
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and <STRONG>if</STRONG>, the name of a file containing long initialization strings.
 
-       These strings are expected to set the terminal  into  modes  consistent
-       with  the  rest of the terminfo description.  They are normally sent to
-       the terminal, by the <EM>init</EM> option of the <STRONG>tput</STRONG>  program,  each  time  the
+       These  strings  are  expected to set the terminal into modes consistent
+       with the rest of the terminfo description.  They are normally  sent  to
+       the  terminal,  by  the  <EM>init</EM> option of the <STRONG>tput</STRONG> program, each time the
        user logs in.  They will be printed in the following order:
 
               run the program
               and finally output
                      <STRONG>is3</STRONG>.
 
-       Most  initialization  is  done with <STRONG>is2</STRONG>.  Special terminal modes can be
-       set up without duplicating strings by putting the common  sequences  in
+       Most initialization is done with <STRONG>is2</STRONG>.  Special terminal  modes  can  be
+       set  up  without duplicating strings by putting the common sequences in
        <STRONG>is2</STRONG> and special cases in <STRONG>is1</STRONG> and <STRONG>is3</STRONG>.
 
-       A  set  of  sequences  that  does a harder reset from a totally unknown
+       A set of sequences that does a harder  reset  from  a  totally  unknown
        state can be given as <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs2</STRONG>, <STRONG>rf</STRONG> and <STRONG>rs3</STRONG>, analogous to <STRONG>is1</STRONG> <STRONG>,</STRONG> <STRONG>is2</STRONG> <STRONG>,</STRONG> <STRONG>if</STRONG>
-       and  <STRONG>is3</STRONG>  respectively.   These  strings  are output by <EM>reset</EM> option of
-       <STRONG>tput</STRONG>, or by the <STRONG>reset</STRONG> program (an alias of <STRONG>tset</STRONG>), which  is  used  when
+       and <STRONG>is3</STRONG> respectively.  These strings are  output  by  <EM>reset</EM>  option  of
+       <STRONG>tput</STRONG>,  or  by  the <STRONG>reset</STRONG> program (an alias of <STRONG>tset</STRONG>), which is used when
        the terminal gets into a wedged state.  Commands are normally placed in
        <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs2</STRONG> <STRONG>rs3</STRONG> and <STRONG>rf</STRONG> only if they produce annoying effects on the screen
        and are not necessary when logging in.  For example, the command to set
-       the vt100 into 80-column mode would normally be part  of  <STRONG>is2</STRONG>,  but  it
-       causes  an  annoying  glitch  of  the screen and is not normally needed
+       the  vt100  into  80-column  mode would normally be part of <STRONG>is2</STRONG>, but it
+       causes an annoying glitch of the screen  and  is  not  normally  needed
        since the terminal is usually already in 80-column mode.
 
-       The <STRONG>reset</STRONG> program writes strings including <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>,  etc.,  in  the  same
-       order  as  the  <EM>init</EM> program, using <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, etc., instead of <STRONG>is1</STRONG>, etc.  If
-       any of <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs2</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs3</STRONG>, or <STRONG>rf</STRONG> reset capability strings are  missing,  the
-       <STRONG>reset</STRONG>   program   falls  back  upon  the  corresponding  initialization
+       The  <STRONG>reset</STRONG>  program  writes  strings including <STRONG>iprog</STRONG>, etc., in the same
+       order as the <EM>init</EM> program, using <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, etc., instead of  <STRONG>is1</STRONG>,  etc.   If
+       any  of  <STRONG>rs1</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs2</STRONG>, <STRONG>rs3</STRONG>, or <STRONG>rf</STRONG> reset capability strings are missing, the
+       <STRONG>reset</STRONG>  program  falls  back  upon  the   corresponding   initialization
        capability string.
 
-       If there are commands to set and clear tab stops, they can be given  as
+       If  there are commands to set and clear tab stops, they can be given as
        <STRONG>tbc</STRONG> (clear all tab stops) and <STRONG>hts</STRONG> (set a tab stop in the current column
-       of every row).  If a more complex sequence is needed to  set  the  tabs
+       of  every  row).   If a more complex sequence is needed to set the tabs
        than can be described by this, the sequence can be placed in <STRONG>is2</STRONG> or <STRONG>if</STRONG>.
 
-       The  <STRONG>tput</STRONG>  <STRONG>reset</STRONG>  command uses the same capability strings as the <STRONG>reset</STRONG>
-       command, although the two programs (<STRONG>tput</STRONG> and <STRONG>reset</STRONG>)  provide  different
+       The <STRONG>tput</STRONG> <STRONG>reset</STRONG> command uses the same capability strings  as  the  <STRONG>reset</STRONG>
+       command,  although  the two programs (<STRONG>tput</STRONG> and <STRONG>reset</STRONG>) provide different
        command-line options.
 
        In  practice,  these  terminfo  capabilities  are  not  often  used  in
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Almost all hardware terminals (at least those which supported tabs)
            initialized those to every <EM>eight</EM> columns:
 
-           The  only  exception  was  the  AT&amp;T 2300 series, which set tabs to
+           The only exception was the AT&amp;T 2300  series,  which  set  tabs  to
            every <EM>five</EM> columns.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   In particular, developers  of  the  hardware  terminals  which  are
-           commonly  used  as  models  for  modern terminal emulators provided
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   In  particular,  developers  of  the  hardware  terminals which are
+           commonly used as models  for  modern  terminal  emulators  provided
            documentation demonstrating that <EM>eight</EM> columns were the standard.
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   Because of this, the terminal initialization programs <STRONG>tput</STRONG> and <STRONG>tset</STRONG>
-           use   the  <STRONG>tbc</STRONG>  (<STRONG>clear_all_tabs</STRONG>)  and  <STRONG>hts</STRONG>  (<STRONG>set_tab</STRONG>)  capabilities
-           directly only when the <STRONG>it</STRONG> (<STRONG>init_tabs</STRONG>) capability is set to a  value
+           use  the  <STRONG>tbc</STRONG>  (<STRONG>clear_all_tabs</STRONG>)  and  <STRONG>hts</STRONG>  (<STRONG>set_tab</STRONG>)   capabilities
+           directly  only when the <STRONG>it</STRONG> (<STRONG>init_tabs</STRONG>) capability is set to a value
            other than <EM>eight</EM>.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Delays-and-Padding">Delays and Padding</a></H3><PRE>
-       Many  older  and slower terminals do not support either XON/XOFF or DTR
-       handshaking, including hard copy terminals and some very  archaic  CRTs
-       (including,  for  example,  DEC  VT100s).   These  may  require padding
+       Many older and slower terminals do not support either XON/XOFF  or  DTR
+       handshaking,  including  hard copy terminals and some very archaic CRTs
+       (including, for  example,  DEC  VT100s).   These  may  require  padding
        characters after certain cursor motions and screen changes.
 
        If the terminal uses xon/xoff handshaking for flow control (that is, it
-       automatically  emits  ^S  back  to  the host when its input buffers are
-       close to full), set <STRONG>xon</STRONG>.  This capability suppresses  the  emission  of
-       padding.   You  can  also  set  it  for  memory-mapped  console devices
+       automatically emits ^S back to the host  when  its  input  buffers  are
+       close  to  full),  set <STRONG>xon</STRONG>.  This capability suppresses the emission of
+       padding.  You  can  also  set  it  for  memory-mapped  console  devices
        effectively that do not have a speed limit.  Padding information should
-       still  be  included  so  that  routines can make better decisions about
+       still be included so that routines  can  make  better  decisions  about
        relative costs, but actual pad characters will not be transmitted.
 
        If <STRONG>pb</STRONG> (padding baud rate) is given, padding is suppressed at baud rates
-       below  the  value  of  <STRONG>pb</STRONG>.  If the entry has no padding baud rate, then
+       below the value of <STRONG>pb</STRONG>.  If the entry has no  padding  baud  rate,  then
        whether padding is emitted or not is completely controlled by <STRONG>xon</STRONG>.
 
-       If the terminal requires other than a null (zero) character as  a  pad,
-       then  this  can  be  given as <STRONG>pad</STRONG>.  Only the first character of the <STRONG>pad</STRONG>
+       If  the  terminal requires other than a null (zero) character as a pad,
+       then this can be given as <STRONG>pad</STRONG>.  Only the first  character  of  the  <STRONG>pad</STRONG>
        string is used.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Status-Lines">Status Lines</a></H3><PRE>
-       Some terminals have an extra "status line" which is not  normally  used
+       Some  terminals  have an extra "status line" which is not normally used
        by software (and thus not counted in the terminal's <STRONG>lines</STRONG> capability).
 
-       The  simplest case is a status line which is cursor-addressable but not
+       The simplest case is a status line which is cursor-addressable but  not
        part of the main scrolling region on the screen; the Heathkit H19 has a
-       status  line  of  this  kind,  as  would a 24-line VT100 with a 23-line
+       status line of this kind, as would  a  24-line  VT100  with  a  23-line
        scrolling region set up on initialization.  This situation is indicated
        by the <STRONG>hs</STRONG> capability.
 
-       Some  terminals  with status lines need special sequences to access the
-       status line.  These may be expressed as a string with single  parameter
-       <STRONG>tsl</STRONG>  which takes the cursor to a given zero-origin column on the status
-       line.  The  capability  <STRONG>fsl</STRONG>  must  return  to  the  main-screen  cursor
+       Some terminals with status lines need special sequences to  access  the
+       status  line.  These may be expressed as a string with single parameter
+       <STRONG>tsl</STRONG> which takes the cursor to a given zero-origin column on the  status
+       line.   The  capability  <STRONG>fsl</STRONG>  must  return  to  the  main-screen cursor
        positions before the last <STRONG>tsl</STRONG>.  You may need to embed the string values
-       of <STRONG>sc</STRONG> (save  cursor)  and  <STRONG>rc</STRONG>  (restore  cursor)  in  <STRONG>tsl</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>fsl</STRONG>  to
+       of  <STRONG>sc</STRONG>  (save  cursor)  and  <STRONG>rc</STRONG>  (restore  cursor)  in  <STRONG>tsl</STRONG>  and <STRONG>fsl</STRONG> to
        accomplish this.
 
-       The  status  line is normally assumed to be the same width as the width
-       of the terminal.  If this is  untrue,  you  can  specify  it  with  the
+       The status line is normally assumed to be the same width as  the  width
+       of  the  terminal.   If  this  is  untrue,  you can specify it with the
        numeric capability <STRONG>wsl</STRONG>.
 
        A command to erase or blank the status line may be specified as <STRONG>dsl</STRONG>.
 
-       The  boolean  capability  <STRONG>eslok</STRONG>  specifies that escape sequences, tabs,
+       The boolean capability <STRONG>eslok</STRONG> specifies  that  escape  sequences,  tabs,
        etc., work ordinarily in the status line.
 
-       The <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> implementation does not yet use any of these  capabilities.
+       The  <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> implementation does not yet use any of these capabilities.
        They are documented here in case they ever become important.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Line-Graphics">Line Graphics</a></H3><PRE>
-       Many  terminals have alternate character sets useful for forms-drawing.
-       Terminfo and <STRONG>curses</STRONG> have built-in  support  for  most  of  the  drawing
-       characters  supported  by the VT100, with some characters from the AT&amp;T
-       4410v1 added.  This alternate character set may  be  specified  by  the
+       Many terminals have alternate character sets useful for  forms-drawing.
+       Terminfo  and  <STRONG>curses</STRONG>  have  built-in  support  for most of the drawing
+       characters supported by the VT100, with some characters from  the  AT&amp;T
+       4410v1  added.   This  alternate  character set may be specified by the
        <STRONG>acsc</STRONG> capability.
 
          <STRONG>Glyph</STRONG>                       <STRONG>ACS</STRONG>            <STRONG>Ascii</STRONG>     <STRONG>acsc</STRONG>     <STRONG>acsc</STRONG>
          board of squares            ACS_BOARD      #         h        0x68
          lantern symbol              ACS_LANTERN    #         i        0x69
          lower right corner          ACS_LRCORNER   +         j        0x6a
+
          upper right corner          ACS_URCORNER   +         k        0x6b
          upper left corner           ACS_ULCORNER   +         l        0x6c
          lower left corner           ACS_LLCORNER   +         m        0x6d
          tee pointing right          ACS_LTEE       +         t        0x74
          tee pointing left           ACS_RTEE       +         u        0x75
          tee pointing up             ACS_BTEE       +         v        0x76
-
          tee pointing down           ACS_TTEE       +         w        0x77
          vertical line               ACS_VLINE      |         x        0x78
          less-than-or-equal-to       ACS_LEQUAL     &lt;         y        0x79
 
        A few notes apply to the table itself:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   X/Open  Curses  incorrectly  states that the mapping for <EM>lantern</EM> is
-           uppercase "I" although Unix implementations use the  lowercase  "i"
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   X/Open Curses incorrectly states that the mapping  for  <EM>lantern</EM>  is
+           uppercase  "I"  although Unix implementations use the lowercase "i"
            mapping.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The  DEC  VT100  implemented graphics using the alternate character
-           set feature, temporarily switching <EM>modes</EM> and sending characters  in
-           the  range  0x60  (96)  to 0x7e (126) (the <STRONG>acsc</STRONG> <STRONG>Value</STRONG> column in the
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The DEC VT100 implemented graphics using  the  alternate  character
+           set  feature, temporarily switching <EM>modes</EM> and sending characters in
+           the range 0x60 (96) to 0x7e (126) (the <STRONG>acsc</STRONG>  <STRONG>Value</STRONG>  column  in  the
            table).
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   The AT&amp;T terminal added graphics characters outside that range.
 
-           Some of the characters within the range do  not  match  the  VT100;
-           presumably  they  were  used in the AT&amp;T terminal: <EM>board</EM> <EM>of</EM> <EM>squares</EM>
-           replaces the VT100 <EM>newline</EM> symbol, while  <EM>lantern</EM>  <EM>symbol</EM>  replaces
+           Some  of  the  characters  within the range do not match the VT100;
+           presumably they were used in the AT&amp;T terminal:  <EM>board</EM>  <EM>of</EM>  <EM>squares</EM>
+           replaces  the  VT100  <EM>newline</EM> symbol, while <EM>lantern</EM> <EM>symbol</EM> replaces
            the VT100 <EM>vertical</EM> <EM>tab</EM> symbol.  The other VT100 symbols for control
-           characters (<EM>horizontal</EM> <EM>tab</EM>, <EM>carriage</EM> <EM>return</EM> and <EM>line-feed</EM>) are  not
+           characters  (<EM>horizontal</EM> <EM>tab</EM>, <EM>carriage</EM> <EM>return</EM> and <EM>line-feed</EM>) are not
            (re)used in curses.
 
-       The  best  way to define a new device's graphics set is to add a column
-       to a copy of this table for your terminal, giving the  character  which
-       (when  emitted  between  <STRONG>smacs</STRONG>/<STRONG>rmacs</STRONG>  switches) will be rendered as the
+       The best way to define a new device's graphics set is to add  a  column
+       to  a  copy of this table for your terminal, giving the character which
+       (when emitted between <STRONG>smacs</STRONG>/<STRONG>rmacs</STRONG> switches) will  be  rendered  as  the
        corresponding graphic.  Then read off the VT100/your terminal character
        pairs right to left in sequence; these become the ACSC string.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Color-Handling">Color Handling</a></H3><PRE>
-       The  curses  library  functions <STRONG>init_pair</STRONG> and <STRONG>init_color</STRONG> manipulate the
-       <EM>color</EM>  <EM>pairs</EM>  and  <EM>color</EM>  <EM>values</EM>  discussed  in   this   section   (see
+       The curses library functions <STRONG>init_pair</STRONG> and  <STRONG>init_color</STRONG>  manipulate  the
+       <EM>color</EM>   <EM>pairs</EM>   and   <EM>color</EM>  <EM>values</EM>  discussed  in  this  section  (see
        <STRONG><A HREF="curs_color.3x.html">curs_color(3x)</A></STRONG> for details on these and related functions).
 
        Most color terminals are either "Tektronix-like" or "HP-like":
            is usually 8), and can set character-cell foreground and background
            characters independently, mixing them into <EM>N</EM> * <EM>N</EM> color-pairs.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On  HP-like  terminals,  the  user  must  set  each  color  pair up
-           separately  (foreground  and  background  are   not   independently
-           settable).   Up  to  <EM>M</EM> color-pairs may be set up from 2*<EM>M</EM> different
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On HP-like  terminals,  the  user  must  set  each  color  pair  up
+           separately   (foreground   and  background  are  not  independently
+           settable).  Up to <EM>M</EM> color-pairs may be set up  from  2*<EM>M</EM>  different
            colors.  ANSI-compatible terminals are Tektronix-like.
 
        Some basic color capabilities are independent of the color method.  The
-       numeric  capabilities  <STRONG>colors</STRONG>  and <STRONG>pairs</STRONG> specify the maximum numbers of
-       colors and color-pairs that can be displayed  simultaneously.   The  <STRONG>op</STRONG>
+       numeric capabilities <STRONG>colors</STRONG> and <STRONG>pairs</STRONG> specify the  maximum  numbers  of
+       colors  and  color-pairs  that can be displayed simultaneously.  The <STRONG>op</STRONG>
        (original pair) string resets foreground and background colors to their
-       default values for the terminal.  The <STRONG>oc</STRONG> string resets  all  colors  or
-       color-pairs  to  their default values for the terminal.  Some terminals
-       (including many PC terminal emulators)  erase  screen  areas  with  the
-       current  background  color rather than the power-up default background;
+       default  values  for  the terminal.  The <STRONG>oc</STRONG> string resets all colors or
+       color-pairs to their default values for the terminal.   Some  terminals
+       (including  many  PC  terminal  emulators)  erase screen areas with the
+       current background color rather than the power-up  default  background;
        these should have the boolean capability <STRONG>bce</STRONG>.
 
-       While the  curses  library  works  with  <EM>color</EM>  <EM>pairs</EM>  (reflecting  the
-       inability  of  some  devices  to  set  foreground and background colors
-       independently), there  are  separate  capabilities  for  setting  these
+       While  the  curses  library  works  with  <EM>color</EM>  <EM>pairs</EM>  (reflecting the
+       inability of some devices  to  set  foreground  and  background  colors
+       independently),  there  are  separate  capabilities  for  setting these
        features:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   To   change  the  current  foreground  or  background  color  on  a
-           Tektronix-type terminal, use <STRONG>setaf</STRONG> (set ANSI foreground) and  <STRONG>setab</STRONG>
-           (set  ANSI  background)  or  <STRONG>setf</STRONG>  (set  foreground)  and <STRONG>setb</STRONG> (set
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   To  change  the  current  foreground  or  background  color  on   a
+           Tektronix-type  terminal, use <STRONG>setaf</STRONG> (set ANSI foreground) and <STRONG>setab</STRONG>
+           (set ANSI background)  or  <STRONG>setf</STRONG>  (set  foreground)  and  <STRONG>setb</STRONG>  (set
            background).  These take one parameter, the color number.  The SVr4
-           documentation  describes only <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG>; the XPG4 draft says that
-           "If the terminal supports ANSI escape sequences to  set  background
-           and   foreground,   they  should  be  coded  as  <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>setab</STRONG>,
+           documentation describes only <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG>; the XPG4 draft says  that
+           "If  the  terminal supports ANSI escape sequences to set background
+           and  foreground,  they  should  be  coded  as  <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>   and   <STRONG>setab</STRONG>,
            respectively.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If the terminal supports other escape sequences to  set  background
-           and   foreground,   they   should   be  coded  as  <STRONG>setf</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>setb</STRONG>,
-           respectively.  The <STRONG>vidputs</STRONG> and the <STRONG><A HREF="curs_refresh.3x.html">refresh(3x)</A></STRONG>  functions  use  the
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   If  the  terminal supports other escape sequences to set background
+           and  foreground,  they  should  be  coded   as   <STRONG>setf</STRONG>   and   <STRONG>setb</STRONG>,
+           respectively.   The  <STRONG>vidputs</STRONG>  and the <STRONG><A HREF="curs_refresh.3x.html">refresh(3x)</A></STRONG> functions use the
            <STRONG>setaf</STRONG> and <STRONG>setab</STRONG> capabilities if they are defined.
 
-       The  <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>setf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setb</STRONG>  capabilities  take  a  single numeric
+       The <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>setf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setb</STRONG>  capabilities  take  a  single  numeric
        argument each.  Argument values 0-7 of <STRONG>setaf</STRONG>/<STRONG>setab</STRONG> are portably defined
-       as  follows (the middle column is the symbolic #define available in the
-       header for the <STRONG>curses</STRONG> or <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> libraries).  The terminal hardware  is
-       free  to  map  these  as  it  likes, but the RGB values indicate normal
+       as follows (the middle column is the symbolic #define available in  the
+       header  for the <STRONG>curses</STRONG> or <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> libraries).  The terminal hardware is
+       free to map these as it likes,  but  the  RGB  values  indicate  normal
        locations in color space.
 
                     <STRONG>Color</STRONG>       <STRONG>#define</STRONG>       <STRONG>Value</STRONG>       <STRONG>RGB</STRONG>
                     yellow    <STRONG>COLOR_YELLOW</STRONG>      6     max,max,0
                     white     <STRONG>COLOR_WHITE</STRONG>       7     max,max,max
 
-       It  is  important  to  not  confuse the two sets of color capabilities;
+       It is important to not confuse the  two  sets  of  color  capabilities;
        otherwise red/blue will be interchanged on the display.
 
-       On an HP-like terminal, use <STRONG>scp</STRONG> with a color-pair number  parameter  to
+       On  an  HP-like terminal, use <STRONG>scp</STRONG> with a color-pair number parameter to
        set which color pair is current.
 
        Some terminals allow the <EM>color</EM> <EM>values</EM> to be modified:
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On  a Tektronix-like terminal, the capability <STRONG>ccc</STRONG> may be present to
-           indicate that colors can be modified.  If so, the <STRONG>initc</STRONG>  capability
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On a Tektronix-like terminal, the capability <STRONG>ccc</STRONG> may be present  to
+           indicate  that colors can be modified.  If so, the <STRONG>initc</STRONG> capability
            will take a color number (0 to <STRONG>colors</STRONG> - 1)and three more parameters
-           which describe the color.  These three parameters default to  being
-           interpreted  as  RGB  (Red,  Green,  Blue)  values.  If the boolean
+           which  describe the color.  These three parameters default to being
+           interpreted as RGB (Red,  Green,  Blue)  values.   If  the  boolean
            capability <STRONG>hls</STRONG> is present, they are instead as HLS (Hue, Lightness,
            Saturation) indices.  The ranges are terminal-dependent.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On  an HP-like terminal, <STRONG>initp</STRONG> may give a capability for changing a
-           color-pair value.  It will  take  seven  parameters;  a  color-pair
-           number  (0  to  <STRONG>max_pairs</STRONG>  -  1),  and two triples describing first
-           background and then foreground colors.  These  parameters  must  be
-           (Red,  Green,  Blue)  or  (Hue, Lightness, Saturation) depending on
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   On an HP-like terminal, <STRONG>initp</STRONG> may give a capability for changing  a
+           color-pair  value.   It  will  take  seven parameters; a color-pair
+           number (0 to <STRONG>max_pairs</STRONG> -  1),  and  two  triples  describing  first
+           background  and  then  foreground colors.  These parameters must be
+           (Red, Green, Blue) or (Hue,  Lightness,  Saturation)  depending  on
            <STRONG>hls</STRONG>.
 
-       On some color terminals,  colors  collide  with  highlights.   You  can
-       register  these collisions with the <STRONG>ncv</STRONG> capability.  This is a bit-mask
-       of  attributes  not  to  be  used  when  colors   are   enabled.    The
+       On  some  color  terminals,  colors  collide  with highlights.  You can
+       register these collisions with the <STRONG>ncv</STRONG> capability.  This is a  bit-mask
+       of   attributes   not   to  be  used  when  colors  are  enabled.   The
        correspondence with the attributes understood by <STRONG>curses</STRONG> is as follows:
 
                   <STRONG>Attribute</STRONG>              <STRONG>Bit</STRONG>   <STRONG>Decimal</STRONG>      <STRONG>Set</STRONG> <STRONG>by</STRONG>
                   A_VERTICAL             14    16384        sgr1
                   A_ITALIC               15    32768        sitm
 
-       For  example, on many IBM PC consoles, the underline attribute collides
-       with the foreground color blue and is  not  available  in  color  mode.
+       For example, on many IBM PC consoles, the underline attribute  collides
+       with  the  foreground  color  blue  and is not available in color mode.
        These should have an <STRONG>ncv</STRONG> capability of 2.
 
-       SVr4  curses does nothing with <STRONG>ncv</STRONG>, ncurses recognizes it and optimizes
+       SVr4 curses does nothing with <STRONG>ncv</STRONG>, ncurses recognizes it and  optimizes
        the output in favor of colors.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Miscellaneous">Miscellaneous</a></H3><PRE>
-       If the terminal requires other than a null (zero) character as  a  pad,
-       then  this  can  be  given as pad.  Only the first character of the pad
+       If  the  terminal requires other than a null (zero) character as a pad,
+       then this can be given as pad.  Only the first  character  of  the  pad
        string is used.  If the terminal does not have a pad character, specify
-       npc.   Note that ncurses implements the termcap-compatible <STRONG>PC</STRONG> variable;
-       though the application may set this value to  something  other  than  a
-       null,  ncurses will test <STRONG>npc</STRONG> first and use napms if the terminal has no
+       npc.  Note that ncurses implements the termcap-compatible <STRONG>PC</STRONG>  variable;
+       though  the  application  may  set this value to something other than a
+       null, ncurses will test <STRONG>npc</STRONG> first and use napms if the terminal has  no
        pad character.
 
-       If the terminal can move up or down half a line, this can be  indicated
-       with  <STRONG>hu</STRONG>  (half-line  up)  and  <STRONG>hd</STRONG> (half-line down).  This is primarily
-       useful for superscripts and subscripts on hard-copy  terminals.   If  a
+       If  the terminal can move up or down half a line, this can be indicated
+       with <STRONG>hu</STRONG> (half-line up) and <STRONG>hd</STRONG>  (half-line  down).   This  is  primarily
+       useful  for  superscripts  and subscripts on hard-copy terminals.  If a
        hard-copy terminal can eject to the next page (form feed), give this as
        <STRONG>ff</STRONG> (usually control/L).
 
-       If there is a command to repeat a given character  a  given  number  of
-       times   (to   save  time  transmitting  a  large  number  of  identical
-       characters) this can be indicated with the  parameterized  string  <STRONG>rep</STRONG>.
-       The  first  parameter is the character to be repeated and the second is
+       If  there  is  a  command to repeat a given character a given number of
+       times  (to  save  time  transmitting  a  large  number   of   identical
+       characters)  this  can  be indicated with the parameterized string <STRONG>rep</STRONG>.
+       The first parameter is the character to be repeated and the  second  is
        the number of times to repeat it.  Thus, tparm(repeat_char, 'x', 10) is
        the same as "xxxxxxxxxx".
 
        If the terminal has a settable command character, such as the TEKTRONIX
-       4025, this can be indicated with <STRONG>cmdch</STRONG>.  A prototype command  character
-       is  chosen  which is used in all capabilities.  This character is given
-       in the <STRONG>cmdch</STRONG> capability to identify it.  The  following  convention  is
+       4025,  this can be indicated with <STRONG>cmdch</STRONG>.  A prototype command character
+       is chosen which is used in all capabilities.  This character  is  given
+       in  the  <STRONG>cmdch</STRONG>  capability to identify it.  The following convention is
        supported on some UNIX systems: The environment is to be searched for a
-       <STRONG>CC</STRONG> variable, and if found, all occurrences of the  prototype  character
+       <STRONG>CC</STRONG>  variable,  and if found, all occurrences of the prototype character
        are replaced with the character in the environment variable.
 
-       Terminal  descriptions  that  do not represent a specific kind of known
-       terminal, such as <EM>switch</EM>, <EM>dialup</EM>, <EM>patch</EM>, and  <EM>network</EM>,  should  include
-       the  <STRONG>gn</STRONG> (generic) capability so that programs can complain that they do
-       not know how to talk to the terminal.  (This capability does not  apply
-       to  <EM>virtual</EM>  terminal  descriptions  for which the escape sequences are
+       Terminal descriptions that do not represent a specific  kind  of  known
+       terminal,  such  as  <EM>switch</EM>, <EM>dialup</EM>, <EM>patch</EM>, and <EM>network</EM>, should include
+       the <STRONG>gn</STRONG> (generic) capability so that programs can complain that they  do
+       not  know how to talk to the terminal.  (This capability does not apply
+       to <EM>virtual</EM> terminal descriptions for which  the  escape  sequences  are
        known.)
 
        If the terminal has a "meta key" which acts as a shift key, setting the
-       8th  bit  of any character transmitted, this fact can be indicated with
-       <STRONG>km</STRONG>.  Otherwise, software will assume that the 8th bit is parity and  it
-       will  usually be cleared.  If strings exist to turn this "meta mode" on
+       8th bit of any character transmitted, this fact can be  indicated  with
+       <STRONG>km</STRONG>.   Otherwise, software will assume that the 8th bit is parity and it
+       will usually be cleared.  If strings exist to turn this "meta mode"  on
        and off, they can be given as <STRONG>smm</STRONG> and <STRONG>rmm</STRONG>.
 
        If the terminal has more lines of memory than will fit on the screen at
-       once,  the number of lines of memory can be indicated with <STRONG>lm</STRONG>.  A value
+       once, the number of lines of memory can be indicated with <STRONG>lm</STRONG>.  A  value
        of <STRONG>lm</STRONG>#0 indicates that the number of lines is not fixed, but that there
        is still more memory than fits on the screen.
 
-       If  the terminal is one of those supported by the UNIX virtual terminal
+       If the terminal is one of those supported by the UNIX virtual  terminal
        protocol, the terminal number can be given as <STRONG>vt</STRONG>.
 
-       Media copy strings which control an auxiliary printer connected to  the
-       terminal  can  be  given as <STRONG>mc0</STRONG>: print the contents of the screen, <STRONG>mc4</STRONG>:
-       turn off the printer, and <STRONG>mc5</STRONG>: turn on the printer.  When  the  printer
-       is  on,  all text sent to the terminal will be sent to the printer.  It
-       is undefined whether the text is also displayed on the terminal  screen
-       when  the  printer  is  on.   A variation <STRONG>mc5p</STRONG> takes one parameter, and
-       leaves the printer on for as  many  characters  as  the  value  of  the
+       Media  copy strings which control an auxiliary printer connected to the
+       terminal can be given as <STRONG>mc0</STRONG>: print the contents of  the  screen,  <STRONG>mc4</STRONG>:
+       turn  off  the printer, and <STRONG>mc5</STRONG>: turn on the printer.  When the printer
+       is on, all text sent to the terminal will be sent to the  printer.   It
+       is  undefined whether the text is also displayed on the terminal screen
+       when the printer is on.  A variation  <STRONG>mc5p</STRONG>  takes  one  parameter,  and
+       leaves  the  printer  on  for  as  many  characters as the value of the
        parameter, then turns the printer off.  The parameter should not exceed
-       255.  All text, including <STRONG>mc4</STRONG>, is transparently passed to  the  printer
+       255.   All  text, including <STRONG>mc4</STRONG>, is transparently passed to the printer
        while an <STRONG>mc5p</STRONG> is in effect.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Glitches-and-Braindamage">Glitches and Braindamage</a></H3><PRE>
-       Hazeltine  terminals, which do not allow "~" characters to be displayed
+       Hazeltine terminals, which do not allow "~" characters to be  displayed
        should indicate <STRONG>hz</STRONG>.
 
-       Terminals which ignore a line-feed immediately after an <STRONG>am</STRONG>  wrap,  such
+       Terminals  which  ignore a line-feed immediately after an <STRONG>am</STRONG> wrap, such
        as the Concept and vt100, should indicate <STRONG>xenl</STRONG>.
 
-       If  <STRONG>el</STRONG>  is  required  to get rid of standout (instead of merely writing
+       If <STRONG>el</STRONG> is required to get rid of standout  (instead  of  merely  writing
        normal text on top of it), <STRONG>xhp</STRONG> should be given.
 
        Teleray terminals, where tabs turn all characters moved over to blanks,
-       should  indicate  <STRONG>xt</STRONG> (destructive tabs).  Note: the variable indicating
-       this  is  now  "dest_tabs_magic_smso";  in  older  versions,   it   was
-       teleray_glitch.   This  glitch  is  also  taken  to mean that it is not
-       possible to position the cursor on top of a  "magic  cookie",  that  to
-       erase  standout  mode  it is instead necessary to use delete and insert
+       should indicate <STRONG>xt</STRONG> (destructive tabs).  Note: the  variable  indicating
+       this   is   now  "dest_tabs_magic_smso";  in  older  versions,  it  was
+       teleray_glitch.  This glitch is also taken  to  mean  that  it  is  not
+       possible  to  position  the  cursor on top of a "magic cookie", that to
+       erase standout mode it is instead necessary to use  delete  and  insert
        line.  The ncurses implementation ignores this glitch.
 
-       The Beehive Superbee, which is unable to correctly transmit the  escape
-       or  control/C  characters,  has <STRONG>xsb</STRONG>, indicating that the f1 key is used
-       for escape and f2 for control/C.  (Only  certain  Superbees  have  this
-       problem,  depending on the ROM.)  Note that in older terminfo versions,
+       The  Beehive Superbee, which is unable to correctly transmit the escape
+       or control/C characters, has <STRONG>xsb</STRONG>, indicating that the f1  key  is  used
+       for  escape  and  f2  for control/C.  (Only certain Superbees have this
+       problem, depending on the ROM.)  Note that in older terminfo  versions,
        this capability was called "beehive_glitch"; it is now "no_esc_ctl_c".
 
-       Other specific terminal  problems  may  be  corrected  by  adding  more
+       Other  specific  terminal  problems  may  be  corrected  by adding more
        capabilities of the form <STRONG>x</STRONG><EM>x</EM>.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Pitfalls-of-Long-Entries">Pitfalls of Long Entries</a></H3><PRE>
-       Long  terminfo  entries are unlikely to be a problem; to date, no entry
-       has  even  approached  terminfo's   4096-byte   string-table   maximum.
-       Unfortunately,  the termcap translations are much more strictly limited
+       Long terminfo entries are unlikely to be a problem; to date,  no  entry
+       has   even   approached   terminfo's  4096-byte  string-table  maximum.
+       Unfortunately, the termcap translations are much more strictly  limited
        (to 1023 bytes), thus termcap translations of long terminfo entries can
        cause problems.
 
-       The  man  pages  for  4.3BSD and older versions of <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> instruct the
-       user to allocate a 1024-byte buffer for the termcap entry.   The  entry
-       gets  null-terminated by the termcap library, so that makes the maximum
-       safe length for a termcap entry 1k-1 (1023) bytes.  Depending  on  what
-       the  application  and the termcap library being used does, and where in
-       the termcap file the terminal type that <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> is  searching  for  is,
+       The man pages for 4.3BSD and older versions  of  <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG>  instruct  the
+       user  to  allocate a 1024-byte buffer for the termcap entry.  The entry
+       gets null-terminated by the termcap library, so that makes the  maximum
+       safe  length  for a termcap entry 1k-1 (1023) bytes.  Depending on what
+       the application and the termcap library being used does, and  where  in
+       the  termcap  file  the terminal type that <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> is searching for is,
        several bad things can happen.
 
-       Some  termcap libraries print a warning message or exit if they find an
+       Some termcap libraries print a warning message or exit if they find  an
        entry that's longer than 1023 bytes; others do not; others truncate the
-       entries  to  1023  bytes.  Some application programs allocate more than
+       entries to 1023 bytes.  Some application programs  allocate  more  than
        the recommended 1K for the termcap entry; others do not.
 
-       Each termcap entry has two important sizes associated with  it:  before
-       "tc"  expansion, and after "tc" expansion.  "tc" is the capability that
+       Each  termcap  entry has two important sizes associated with it: before
+       "tc" expansion, and after "tc" expansion.  "tc" is the capability  that
        tacks on another termcap entry to the end of the current one, to add on
        its capabilities.  If a termcap entry does not use the "tc" capability,
        then of course the two lengths are the same.
 
-       The "before tc expansion" length is the most important one, because  it
-       affects  more than just users of that particular terminal.  This is the
-       length of the entry as it exists in /etc/termcap, minus the  backslash-
+       The  "before tc expansion" length is the most important one, because it
+       affects more than just users of that particular terminal.  This is  the
+       length  of the entry as it exists in /etc/termcap, minus the backslash-
        newline pairs, which <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> strips out while reading it.  Some termcap
        libraries strip off the final newline, too (GNU termcap does not).  Now
        suppose:
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and the application has only allocated a 1k buffer,
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and  the termcap library (like the one in BSD/OS 1.1 and GNU) reads
-           the whole entry into the buffer, no matter what its length, to  see
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and the termcap library (like the one in BSD/OS 1.1 and GNU)  reads
+           the  whole entry into the buffer, no matter what its length, to see
            if it is the entry it wants,
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and  <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG>  is  searching  for a terminal type that either is the
-           long entry, appears in the termcap file after the  long  entry,  or
-           does  not  appear in the file at all (so that <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> has to search
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   and <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> is searching for a terminal type  that  either  is  the
+           long  entry,  appears  in the termcap file after the long entry, or
+           does not appear in the file at all (so that <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> has  to  search
            the whole termcap file).
 
-       Then <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> will overwrite memory, perhaps  its  stack,  and  probably
-       core   dump   the  program.   Programs  like  telnet  are  particularly
-       vulnerable; modern telnets pass along values  like  the  terminal  type
-       automatically.   The  results  are almost as undesirable with a termcap
-       library, like SunOS 4.1.3 and Ultrix 4.4, that prints warning  messages
-       when  it  reads  an  overly  long  termcap entry.  If a termcap library
-       truncates long entries, like OSF/1 3.0, it is immune to dying here  but
+       Then  <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG>  will  overwrite  memory, perhaps its stack, and probably
+       core  dump  the  program.   Programs  like  telnet   are   particularly
+       vulnerable;  modern  telnets  pass  along values like the terminal type
+       automatically.  The results are almost as undesirable  with  a  termcap
+       library,  like SunOS 4.1.3 and Ultrix 4.4, that prints warning messages
+       when it reads an overly long  termcap  entry.   If  a  termcap  library
+       truncates  long entries, like OSF/1 3.0, it is immune to dying here but
        will return incorrect data for the terminal.
 
-       The  "after  tc  expansion"  length  will  have a similar effect to the
+       The "after tc expansion" length will  have  a  similar  effect  to  the
        above, but only for people who actually set TERM to that terminal type,
-       since  <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG>  only  does "tc" expansion once it is found the terminal
+       since <STRONG>tgetent</STRONG> only does "tc" expansion once it is  found  the  terminal
        type it was looking for, not while searching.
 
-       In summary, a termcap entry that is longer than 1023 bytes  can  cause,
-       on  various  combinations of termcap libraries and applications, a core
-       dump, warnings, or incorrect operation.  If it is too long even  before
-       "tc"  expansion,  it will have this effect even for users of some other
-       terminal types and users whose TERM variable does not  have  a  termcap
+       In  summary,  a termcap entry that is longer than 1023 bytes can cause,
+       on various combinations of termcap libraries and applications,  a  core
+       dump,  warnings, or incorrect operation.  If it is too long even before
+       "tc" expansion, it will have this effect even for users of  some  other
+       terminal  types  and  users whose TERM variable does not have a termcap
        entry.
 
-       When  in  -C (translate to termcap) mode, the <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> implementation of
-       <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG> issues warning messages when the pre-tc  length  of  a  termcap
-       translation  is  too  long.  The -c (check) option also checks resolved
+       When in -C (translate to termcap) mode, the <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  implementation  of
+       <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>  issues  warning  messages  when the pre-tc length of a termcap
+       translation is too long.  The -c (check) option  also  checks  resolved
        (after tc expansion) lengths.
 
 
 </PRE><H3><a name="h3-Binary-Compatibility">Binary Compatibility</a></H3><PRE>
-       It is not wise to count  on  portability  of  binary  terminfo  entries
-       between  commercial  UNIX  versions.   The problem is that there are at
-       least two versions of terminfo (under HP-UX  and  AIX)  which  diverged
-       from   System   V   terminfo  after  SVr1,  and  have  added  extension
-       capabilities to the string table that (in the  binary  format)  collide
+       It  is  not  wise  to  count  on portability of binary terminfo entries
+       between commercial UNIX versions.  The problem is  that  there  are  at
+       least  two  versions  of  terminfo (under HP-UX and AIX) which diverged
+       from  System  V  terminfo  after  SVr1,  and   have   added   extension
+       capabilities  to  the  string table that (in the binary format) collide
        with System V and XSI Curses extensions.
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-EXTENSIONS">EXTENSIONS</a></H2><PRE>
-       Searching    for   terminal   descriptions   in   <STRONG>$HOME/.terminfo</STRONG>   and
+       Searching   for   terminal   descriptions   in   <STRONG>$HOME/.terminfo</STRONG>    and
        TERMINFO_DIRS is not supported by older implementations.
 
-       Some SVr4 <STRONG>curses</STRONG> implementations, and all  previous  to  SVr4,  do  not
+       Some  SVr4  <STRONG>curses</STRONG>  implementations,  and  all previous to SVr4, do not
        interpret the %A and %O operators in parameter strings.
 
-       SVr4/XPG4  do  not  specify  whether <STRONG>msgr</STRONG> licenses movement while in an
-       alternate-character-set mode (such modes may, among other  things,  map
-       CR  and  NL  to  characters  that  do  not trigger local motions).  The
-       <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> implementation ignores <STRONG>msgr</STRONG> in <STRONG>ALTCHARSET</STRONG>  mode.   This  raises
+       SVr4/XPG4 do not specify whether <STRONG>msgr</STRONG> licenses  movement  while  in  an
+       alternate-character-set  mode  (such modes may, among other things, map
+       CR and NL to characters  that  do  not  trigger  local  motions).   The
+       <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  implementation  ignores  <STRONG>msgr</STRONG> in <STRONG>ALTCHARSET</STRONG> mode.  This raises
        the  possibility  that  an  XPG4  implementation  making  the  opposite
-       interpretation may need terminfo entries made for <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> to have  <STRONG>msgr</STRONG>
+       interpretation  may need terminfo entries made for <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> to have <STRONG>msgr</STRONG>
        turned off.
 
        The <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> library handles insert-character and insert-character modes
-       in a slightly non-standard way to get better  update  efficiency.   See
+       in  a  slightly  non-standard way to get better update efficiency.  See
        the <STRONG>Insert/Delete</STRONG> <STRONG>Character</STRONG> subsection above.
 
-       The  parameter  substitutions  for  <STRONG>set_clock</STRONG> and <STRONG>display_clock</STRONG> are not
-       documented in SVr4 or the XSI Curses standard.  They are  deduced  from
+       The parameter substitutions for <STRONG>set_clock</STRONG>  and  <STRONG>display_clock</STRONG>  are  not
+       documented  in  SVr4 or the XSI Curses standard.  They are deduced from
        the documentation for the AT&amp;T 505 terminal.
 
-       Be  careful  assigning the <STRONG>kmous</STRONG> capability.  The <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> library wants
-       to interpret it as <STRONG>KEY_MOUSE</STRONG>, for use by terminals and  emulators  like
-       xterm  that can return mouse-tracking information in the keyboard-input
+       Be careful assigning the <STRONG>kmous</STRONG> capability.  The <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG>  library  wants
+       to  interpret  it as <STRONG>KEY_MOUSE</STRONG>, for use by terminals and emulators like
+       xterm that can return mouse-tracking information in the  keyboard-input
        stream.
 
-       X/Open Curses does not mention  italics.   Portable  applications  must
-       assume  that  numeric  capabilities  are  signed  16-bit  values.  This
-       includes the <EM>no</EM><STRONG>_</STRONG><EM>color</EM><STRONG>_</STRONG><EM>video</EM> (ncv) capability.   The  32768  mask  value
-       used  for  italics with ncv can be confused with an absent or cancelled
-       ncv.  If italics should work with colors, then the ncv  value  must  be
+       X/Open  Curses  does  not  mention italics.  Portable applications must
+       assume that  numeric  capabilities  are  signed  16-bit  values.   This
+       includes  the  <EM>no</EM><STRONG>_</STRONG><EM>color</EM><STRONG>_</STRONG><EM>video</EM>  (ncv)  capability.  The 32768 mask value
+       used for italics with ncv can be confused with an absent  or  cancelled
+       ncv.   If  italics  should work with colors, then the ncv value must be
        specified, even if it is zero.
 
-       Different  commercial  ports  of  terminfo and curses support different
-       subsets of the XSI  Curses  standard  and  (in  some  cases)  different
+       Different commercial ports of terminfo  and  curses  support  different
+       subsets  of  the  XSI  Curses  standard  and  (in some cases) different
        extension sets.  Here is a summary, accurate as of October 1995:
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>SVR4,</STRONG> <STRONG>Solaris,</STRONG> <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> -- These support all SVr4 capabilities.
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>SGI</STRONG> -- Supports the SVr4 set, adds one undocumented extended string
            capability (<STRONG>set_pglen</STRONG>).
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>SVr1,</STRONG> <STRONG>Ultrix</STRONG> -- These  support  a  restricted  subset  of  terminfo
-           capabilities.   The  booleans  end with <STRONG>xon_xoff</STRONG>; the numerics with
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>SVr1,</STRONG>  <STRONG>Ultrix</STRONG>  --  These  support  a  restricted subset of terminfo
+           capabilities.  The booleans end with <STRONG>xon_xoff</STRONG>;  the  numerics  with
            <STRONG>width_status_line</STRONG>; and the strings with <STRONG>prtr_non</STRONG>.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>HP/UX</STRONG> -- Supports the  SVr1  subset,  plus  the  SVr[234]  numerics
-           <STRONG>num_labels</STRONG>,   <STRONG>label_height</STRONG>,  <STRONG>label_width</STRONG>,  plus  function  keys  11
-           through 63, plus <STRONG>plab_norm</STRONG>,  <STRONG>label_on</STRONG>,  and  <STRONG>label_off</STRONG>,  plus  some
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>HP/UX</STRONG>  --  Supports  the  SVr1  subset,  plus the SVr[234] numerics
+           <STRONG>num_labels</STRONG>,  <STRONG>label_height</STRONG>,  <STRONG>label_width</STRONG>,  plus  function  keys   11
+           through  63,  plus  <STRONG>plab_norm</STRONG>,  <STRONG>label_on</STRONG>,  and <STRONG>label_off</STRONG>, plus some
            incompatible extensions in the string table.
 
-       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>AIX</STRONG>  -- Supports the SVr1 subset, plus function keys 11 through 63,
+       <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>AIX</STRONG> -- Supports the SVr1 subset, plus function keys 11 through  63,
            plus a number of incompatible string table extensions.
 
        <STRONG>o</STRONG>   <STRONG>OSF</STRONG> -- Supports both the SVr4 set and the AIX extensions.
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
-       <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>,    <STRONG><A HREF="tabs.1.html">tabs(1)</A></STRONG>,    <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>,    <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>,     <STRONG><A HREF="curs_color.3x.html">curs_color(3x)</A></STRONG>,
-       <STRONG><A HREF="curs_variables.3x.html">curs_variables(3x)</A></STRONG>,     <STRONG>printf(3)</STRONG>,     <STRONG><A HREF="term_variables.3x.html">term_variables(3x)</A></STRONG>.     <STRONG><A HREF="term.5.html">term(5)</A></STRONG>.
+       <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>,     <STRONG><A HREF="tabs.1.html">tabs(1)</A></STRONG>,    <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>,    <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>,    <STRONG><A HREF="curs_color.3x.html">curs_color(3x)</A></STRONG>,
+       <STRONG><A HREF="curs_variables.3x.html">curs_variables(3x)</A></STRONG>,    <STRONG>printf(3)</STRONG>,     <STRONG><A HREF="term_variables.3x.html">term_variables(3x)</A></STRONG>.      <STRONG><A HREF="term.5.html">term(5)</A></STRONG>.
        <STRONG><A HREF="user_caps.5.html">user_caps(5)</A></STRONG>.
 
 
index 4127b6d038616d07e2a940b730acccaa45bc9f6e..18acbfd6951fabaaf9dbd5844353ffecb7c7ecac 100644 (file)
        <STRONG><A HREF="captoinfo.1m.html">captoinfo(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="infotocap.1m.html">infotocap(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="toe.1m.html">toe(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>,
        <STRONG><A HREF="term.5.html">term(5)</A></STRONG>.  <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>.  <STRONG><A HREF="user_caps.5.html">user_caps(5)</A></STRONG>.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-AUTHOR">AUTHOR</a></H2><PRE>
index a55bf168b7255848a3c084e2b7f165d27ed3dd71..0b882696402161b53d3909dc1ae6edb33c875ba9 100644 (file)
        <STRONG><A HREF="captoinfo.1m.html">captoinfo(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="infocmp.1m.html">infocmp(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="infotocap.1m.html">infotocap(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="tic.1m.html">tic(1m)</A></STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="ncurses.3x.html">curses(3x)</A></STRONG>,
        <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 
index 4376be4580af386b6c243c8bbc4ce471ec36885b..216731c1ddb29218c3e152ade8295b2d1b63e068 100644 (file)
 </PRE><H2><a name="h2-SEE-ALSO">SEE ALSO</a></H2><PRE>
        <STRONG><A HREF="clear.1.html">clear(1)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG>stty(1)</STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="tabs.1.html">tabs(1)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="tset.1.html">tset(1)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="curs_termcap.3x.html">curs_termcap(3x)</A></STRONG>, <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>.
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 
index 92f13e131f4e259dc8d2cf23b97be17fe10c4957..984c462b19f63fcf1f80b1cb615718d3cc05192a 100644 (file)
        <STRONG>csh(1)</STRONG>,   <STRONG>sh(1)</STRONG>,   <STRONG>stty(1)</STRONG>,   <STRONG><A HREF="curs_terminfo.3x.html">curs_terminfo(3x)</A></STRONG>,  <STRONG>tty(4)</STRONG>,  <STRONG><A HREF="terminfo.5.html">terminfo(5)</A></STRONG>,
        <STRONG>ttys(5)</STRONG>, <STRONG>environ(7)</STRONG>
 
-       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211002).
+       This describes <STRONG>ncurses</STRONG> version 6.2 (patch 20211009).
 
 
 
index e848d34aa0290a084773956a00e7220059b2dd24..7bc00ea6b92dbbdf27a4e07de7efdc8e6f4070ab 100644 (file)
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@
 # Author: Zeyd M. Ben-Halim <zmbenhal@netcom.com> 1992,1995
 #    and: Eric S. Raymond <esr@snark.thyrsus.com>
 #
-# $Id: Caps,v 1.47 2021/09/04 10:52:55 tom Exp $
+# $Id: Caps,v 1.48 2021/10/08 07:55:48 tom Exp $
 #
 # This is the master termcap/terminfo capability table.
 #
@@ -601,7 +601,7 @@ key_f62                             kf62    str     Fq      KEY_F(62)       -       ----E   F62 function key
 key_f63                                kf63    str     Fr      KEY_F(63)       -       ----E   F63 function key
 clr_bol                                el1     str     cb      -               -       -----   Clear to beginning of line
 clear_margins                  mgc     str     MC      -               -       -----   clear right and left soft margins
-set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  See smgl. (ML is not in BSD termcap).
+set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  (ML is not in BSD termcap).
 set_right_margin               smgr    str     MR      -               -       -----   set right soft margin at current column
 label_format                   fln     str     Lf      -               -       -----   label format
 set_clock                      sclk    str     SC      -               -       -----   set clock, #1 hrs #2 mins #3 secs
index e939f9daae68aedb19d660f47192b7f8e8dc9820..ee9f2cf24df1ec939c4c4f02c781f94387a39fd5 100644 (file)
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@
 #
 # Author: Thomas Dickey
 #
-# $Id: Caps.aix4,v 1.19 2021/09/04 10:52:55 tom Exp $
+# $Id: Caps.aix4,v 1.20 2021/10/08 07:55:48 tom Exp $
 #
 # This is an adaptation of ncurses' termcap/terminfo capability table, which
 # is designed to align with AIX 4.x's terminfo.
@@ -703,7 +703,7 @@ key_sundo                   kUND    str     !3      KEY_SUNDO       0626    -----   shifted undo key
 req_for_input                  rfi     str     RF      -               -       -----   send next input char (for ptys)
 clr_bol                                el1     str     cb      -               -       -----   Clear to beginning of line
 clear_margins                  mgc     str     MC      -               -       -----   clear right and left soft margins
-set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  See smgl. (ML is not in BSD termcap).
+set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  (ML is not in BSD termcap).
 set_right_margin               smgr    str     MR      -               -       -----   set right soft margin at current column
 label_format                   fln     str     Lf      -               -       -----   label format
 set_clock                      sclk    str     SC      -               -       -----   set clock, #1 hrs #2 mins #3 secs
index 3aae4dd92c498ebf4675b9f10d30f5e98d549d1e..3c0444f81d64ba61115943dfc7fa7b47ad1909a1 100644 (file)
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@
 #
 # Author: Thomas Dickey
 #
-# $Id: Caps.hpux11,v 1.17 2021/09/04 10:52:55 tom Exp $
+# $Id: Caps.hpux11,v 1.18 2021/10/08 07:55:48 tom Exp $
 #
 # This is an adaptation of ncurses' termcap/terminfo capability table, which
 # is designed to align with HPUX 11.x's terminfo.
@@ -609,7 +609,7 @@ key_sundo                   kUND    str     !3      KEY_SUNDO       0626    -----   shifted undo key
 req_for_input                  rfi     str     RF      -               -       -----   send next input char (for ptys)
 clr_bol                                el1     str     cb      -               -       -----   Clear to beginning of line
 clear_margins                  mgc     str     MC      -               -       -----   clear right and left soft margins
-set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  See smgl. (ML is not in BSD termcap).
+set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  (ML is not in BSD termcap).
 set_right_margin               smgr    str     MR      -               -       -----   set right soft margin at current column
 label_format                   fln     str     Lf      -               -       -----   label format
 set_clock                      sclk    str     SC      -               -       -----   set clock, #1 hrs #2 mins #3 secs
index fb88c94c74028a058d1037d4e2f84f984aa51dcc..09d7a472d6bcc68a4f756cade931f7d8434b7ebf 100644 (file)
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@
 # Author: Thomas Dickey
 #    and: Ilya Zakharevich
 #
-# $Id: Caps.keys,v 1.16 2021/09/04 10:52:55 tom Exp $
+# $Id: Caps.keys,v 1.17 2021/10/08 07:55:48 tom Exp $
 #
 # This is an adaptation of ncurses' termcap/terminfo capability table, which
 # is illustrates an experimental extension to describe alt-, shift- and
@@ -603,7 +603,7 @@ key_f62                             kf62    str     Fq      KEY_F(62)       -       ----E   F62 function key
 key_f63                                kf63    str     Fr      KEY_F(63)       -       ----E   F63 function key
 clr_bol                                el1     str     cb      -               -       -----   Clear to beginning of line
 clear_margins                  mgc     str     MC      -               -       -----   clear right and left soft margins
-set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  See smgl. (ML is not in BSD termcap).
+set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  (ML is not in BSD termcap).
 set_right_margin               smgr    str     MR      -               -       -----   set right soft margin at current column
 label_format                   fln     str     Lf      -               -       -----   label format
 set_clock                      sclk    str     SC      -               -       -----   set clock, #1 hrs #2 mins #3 secs
index 0f77a452e15f02cf1a76f6242fb0004837f22c7d..beb71c342fb6dd8924867e2df229fbd1db27d750 100644 (file)
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@
 #
 # Author: Thomas Dickey
 #
-# $Id: Caps.osf1r5,v 1.15 2021/09/04 10:52:55 tom Exp $
+# $Id: Caps.osf1r5,v 1.16 2021/10/08 07:55:48 tom Exp $
 #
 # This is an adaptation of ncurses' termcap/terminfo capability table, which
 # is designed to align with OSF/1 version 5 (Tru64) terminfo.
@@ -743,7 +743,7 @@ set_clock                   sclk    str     SC      -               -       -----   set clock, #1 hrs #2 mins #3 secs
 set_color_band         setcolor        str     Yz      -               -       -----   Change to ribbon color #1
 set_color_pair                 scp     str     sp      -               -       -----   Set current color pair to #1
 set_foreground                 setf    str     Sf      -               -       -----   Set foreground color #1
-set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  See smgl. (ML is not in BSD termcap).
+set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  (ML is not in BSD termcap).
 set_left_margin_parm           smglp   str     Zm      -               -       -----   Set left (right) margin at column #1
 set_lr_margin                  smglr   str     ML      -               -       -----   Set both left and right margins to #1, #2.  (ML is not in BSD termcap).
 set_page_length                        slines  str     YZ      -               -       -----   Set page length to #1 lines
index 89c5ebe65b0c791b20d6ac392daf2a794ec462f9..af47de9cc9cc9996aed9b9e533666309a443acd9 100644 (file)
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@
 #
 # Author: Thomas Dickey
 #
-# $Id: Caps.uwin,v 1.14 2021/09/04 10:52:55 tom Exp $
+# $Id: Caps.uwin,v 1.15 2021/10/08 07:55:48 tom Exp $
 #
 # This is an adaptation of ncurses' termcap/terminfo capability table, which
 # is designed to align with U/Win's terminfo.
@@ -569,7 +569,7 @@ key_f62                             kf62    str     Fq      KEY_F(62)       -       ----E   F62 function key
 key_f63                                kf63    str     Fr      KEY_F(63)       -       ----E   F63 function key
 clr_bol                                el1     str     cb      -               -       -----   Clear to beginning of line
 clear_margins                  mgc     str     MC      -               -       -----   clear right and left soft margins
-set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  See smgl. (ML is not in BSD termcap).
+set_left_margin                        smgl    str     ML      -               -       -----   set left soft margin at current column.  (ML is not in BSD termcap).
 set_right_margin               smgr    str     MR      -               -       -----   set right soft margin at current column
 device_type                    devt    str     dv      -               -       -----   Indicate language/codeset support
 code_set_init                  csin    str     ci      -               -       -----   Init sequence for multiple codesets
index eb7e659746dd686ca39b1f491f22c0c83851de13..822e677b975a708fcd0d1f4e3c47e33aad93e88a 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 .\"***************************************************************************
-.\" Copyright 2018-2019,2020 Thomas E. Dickey                                *
+.\" Copyright 2018-2020,2021 Thomas E. Dickey                                *
 .\" Copyright 2008-2016,2017 Free Software Foundation, Inc.                  *
 .\"                                                                          *
 .\" Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a  *
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@
 .\" authorization.                                                           *
 .\"***************************************************************************
 .\"
-.\" $Id: tabs.1,v 1.28 2020/12/19 21:50:22 tom Exp $
+.\" $Id: tabs.1,v 1.30 2021/10/09 23:48:50 tom Exp $
 .TH @TABS@ 1 ""
 .ds n 5
 .ie \n(.g .ds `` \(lq
@@ -140,34 +140,78 @@ tabs 1,+5,+5,+5,+5
 .PP
 which is equivalent to the 1,6,11,16,21 example.
 .SS Predefined Tab-Stops
-X/Open defines several predefined lists of tab stops.
+POSIX defines several predefined lists of tab stops.
 .TP 5
 .B \-a
 Assembler, IBM S/370, first format
+.br
+1,10,16,36,72
 .TP 5
 .B \-a2
 Assembler, IBM S/370, second format
+.br
+1,10,16,40,72
 .TP 5
 .B \-c
 COBOL, normal format
+.br
+1,8,12,16,20,55
 .TP 5
 .B \-c2
 COBOL compact format
+.br
+1,6,10,14,49
 .TP 5
 .B \-c3
 COBOL compact format extended
+.br
+1,6,10,14,18,22,26,30,34,38,42,46,50,54,58,62,67
 .TP 5
 .B \-f
 FORTRAN
+.br
+1,7,11,15,19,23
 .TP 5
 .B \-p
 PL/I
+.br
+1,5,9,13,17,21,25,29,33,37,41,45,49,53,57,61
 .TP 5
 .B \-s
 SNOBOL
+.br
+1,10,55
 .TP 5
 .B \-u
 UNIVAC 1100 Assembler
+.br
+1,12,20,44
+.SS Margins
+A few terminals provide the capability for changing their left/right margins.
+The @TABS@ program has an option to use this feature:
+.TP 5
+.BI \+m \ margin
+The effect depends on whether the terminal has the margin capabilities:
+.RS
+.bP
+If the terminal provides the capability for setting the left margin,
+@TABS@ uses this, and adjusts the available width for tab-stops.
+.bP
+If the terminal does not provide the margin capabilities,
+@TABS@ imitates the effect, putting the tab stops at the appropriate
+place on each line.
+The terminal's left-margin is not modified.
+.RE
+.IP
+If the \fImargin\fP parameter is omitted, the default is 10.
+Use \fB\+m0\fP to reset the left margin,
+i.e., to the left edge of the terminal's display.
+Before setting a left-margin,
+@TABS@ resets the margin to reduce problems which might arise
+on moving the cursor before the current left-margin.
+.PP
+When setting or resetting the left-margin,
+@TABS@ may reset the right-margin.
 .SH PORTABILITY
 .PP
 \fIIEEE Std 1003.1/The Open Group Base Specifications Issue 7\fP (POSIX.1-2008)
@@ -181,7 +225,7 @@ Very few of the entries in the terminal database provide the
 capability needed to support the feature.
 .bP
 There is no counterpart in X/Open Curses Issue 7 for this utility,
-unlike \fB@TPUT@(1)\fP.
+unlike \fB@TPUT@\fP(1).
 .PP
 The \fB\-d\fP (debug) and \fB\-n\fP (no-op) options are extensions not provided
 by other implementations.
index 07217112cab5022264f2ef54178aac7ee544e333..d3cbbf385fb9ef4caeccde729086a059cd303b71 100644 (file)
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@
 .\" authorization.                                                           *
 .\"***************************************************************************
 .\"
-.\" $Id: terminfo.tail,v 1.107 2021/10/02 20:54:06 tom Exp $
+.\" $Id: terminfo.tail,v 1.108 2021/10/09 23:13:23 tom Exp $
 .ps +1
 .SS User-Defined Capabilities
 .
@@ -708,6 +708,8 @@ smgbp       Set bottom margin at line \fIN\fP
 smglp  Set left margin at column \fIN\fP
 smgrp  Set right margin at column \fIN\fP
 smgtp  Set top margin at line \fIN\fP
+smglr  Set both left and right margins to \fIL\fP and \fIR\fP
+smgtb  Set both top and bottom margins to \fIT\fP and \fIB\fP
 .TE
 .PP
 When writing an application that
@@ -758,6 +760,13 @@ only one capability in the pairs
 \fBsmgtp\fP and \fBsmgbp\fP should be defined,
 leaving the other unset.
 .PP
+Except for very old terminal descriptions, e.g., those developed for SVr4,
+the scheme just described should be considered obsolete.
+An improved set of capabilities was added late in the SVr4 releases
+(\fBsmglr\fP and \fBsmgtb\fP),
+which explicitly use two parameters for setting the left/right or top/bottom
+margins.
+.PP
 When setting margins, the line- and column-values are zero-based.
 .PP
 The \fBmgc\fP string capability should be defined.
index bddbf10786585bfe4ee7dc5fc26e8e6adc99b318..d464d4a74b4547d9d1ae29a90e259945caaa6d48 100644 (file)
@@ -6,8 +6,8 @@
 # Report bugs and new terminal descriptions to
 #      bug-ncurses@gnu.org
 #
-#      $Revision: 1.918 $
-#      $Date: 2021/09/21 08:18:36 $
+#      $Revision: 1.942 $
+#      $Date: 2021/10/09 22:06:46 $
 #
 # The original header is preserved below for reference.  It is noted that there
 # is a "newer" version which differs in some cosmetic details (but actually
@@ -802,7 +802,7 @@ st52|st52-m|at|at-m|atari|atari-m|atari_st|atarist-m|Atari ST,
        kf9=\EX, khlp=\EH, khome=\EE, kich1=\EI, knp=\Eb, kpp=\Ea,
        kund=\EK, nel=\r\n, rc=\Ek, rev=\Ep, ri=\EI, rmso=\Eq,
        rs2=\Ev\Eq\Ee, sc=\Ej, sgr0=\Eq, smso=\Ep,
-tw100|toswin vt100 window mgr,
+tw100|Toswin vt100 window manager,
        eo, mir, msgr, xon,
        colors#8, cols#80, it#8, lines#24, pairs#64, vt#3,
        acsc=++\,\,--..00II``aaffgghhjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxy
@@ -871,7 +871,7 @@ stv52pc|MiNT virtual console with PC charset,
        smso=\Ep, smul=\EyH,
 
 # From: Simson L. Garfinkel <simsong@media-lab.mit.edu>
-atari-old|atari st,
+atari-old|Atari st,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#25,
        clear=\EH\EJ, cub1=\ED, cud1=\EB, cuf1=\EC,
@@ -954,7 +954,7 @@ beterm|BeOS Terminal,
 # All linux kernels since 1.2.13 (at least) set the screen size
 # themselves; this entry assumes that capability.
 #
-linux-basic|linux console,
+linux-basic|Linux console,
        am, bce, eo, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        it#8, ncv#18, U8#1,
        acsc=+\020\,\021-\030.^Y0\333`\004a\261f\370g\361h\260i
@@ -996,13 +996,13 @@ linux-m|Linux console no color,
 # not supposedly back-portable to older SV curses (although it has worked fine
 # on Solaris for several years) and not supported in ncurses versions before
 # 1.9.9.
-linux-c-nc|linux console with color-change,
+linux-c-nc|Linux console with color-change,
        ccc,
        initc=\E]P%p1%x%p2%{255}%*%{1000}%/%02x%p3%{255}%*%{1000}%/
              %02x%p4%{255}%*%{1000}%/%02x,
        oc=\E]R, use=linux-basic,
 # From: Dennis Henriksen <opus@osrl.dk>, 9 July 1996
-linux-c|linux console 1.3.6+ for older ncurses,
+linux-c|Linux console 1.3.6+ for older ncurses,
        ccc,
        initc=\E]P%?%p1%{9}%>%t%p1%{10}%-%'a'%+%c%e%p1%d%;%p2%{255}
              %*%{1000}%/%Pr%gr%{16}%/%Px%?%gx%{9}%>%t%gx%{10}%-%'a'
@@ -1018,7 +1018,7 @@ linux-c|linux console 1.3.6+ for older ncurses,
 # The 2.2.x kernels add a private mode that sets the cursor type; use that to
 # get a block cursor for cvvis.
 # reported by Frank Heckenbach <frank@g-n-u.de>.
-linux2.2|linux 2.2.x console,
+linux2.2|Linux 2.2.x console,
        civis=\E[?25l\E[?1c, cnorm=\E[?25h\E[?0c,
        cvvis=\E[?25h\E[?8c, use=linux-c-nc,
 
@@ -1049,7 +1049,7 @@ linux2.2|linux 2.2.x console,
 #
 #    https://lwn.net/Articles/284767/
 #      "An interview with the new embedded maintainers"
-linux2.6|linux 2.6.x console,
+linux2.6|Linux 2.6.x console,
        acsc=++\,\,--..00``aaffgghhiijjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxy
             yzz{{||}}~~,
        enacs=\E)0, rmacs=^O,
@@ -1070,11 +1070,11 @@ linux2.6|linux 2.6.x console,
 #
 # The suggested mapping for the conventional \E[Z is provided in this entry as
 # an extended key to lessen user surprise -TD
-linux3.0|linux 3.0 kernels,
+linux3.0|Linux 3.0 kernels,
        kcbt=\E^I, E3=\E[3J, kcbt2=\E[Z, use=linux2.6,
 
 # This is Linux console for ncurses.
-linux|linux console,
+linux|Linux console,
        use=linux3.0,
 
 # Subject: linux 2.6.26 vt back_color_erase
@@ -1083,16 +1083,16 @@ linux|linux console,
 # apparently from
 #      http://lkml.org/lkml/2008/4/26/305
 #      http://lkml.org/lkml/2008/10/3/66
-linux2.6.26|linux console w/o bce,
+linux2.6.26|Linux console w/o bce,
        bce@, use=linux2.6,
 
 # See the note on ICH/ICH1 VERSUS RMIR/SMIR near the end of file
-linux-nic|linux with ich/ich1 suppressed for non-curses programs,
+linux-nic|Linux with ich/ich1 suppressed for non-curses programs,
        ich@, ich1@, use=linux,
 
 # This assumes you have used setfont(8) to load one of the Linux koi8-r fonts.
 # acsc entry from Pavel Roskin" <pavel@absolute.spb.su>, 29 Sep 1997.
-linux-koi8|linux with koi8 alternate character set,
+linux-koi8|Linux with koi8 alternate character set,
        acsc=+\020\,\021-\030.^Y0\215`\004a\221f\234g\237h\220i
             \276j\205k\203l\202m\204n\212o~p\0q\0r\0s_t\206u\207v
             \211w\210x\201y\230z\231{\267|\274~\224,
@@ -1100,11 +1100,11 @@ linux-koi8|linux with koi8 alternate character set,
 
 # Another entry for KOI8-r with Qing Long's acsc.
 # (which one better complies with the standard?)
-linux-koi8r|linux with koi8-r alternate character set,
+linux-koi8r|Linux with koi8-r alternate character set,
        use=linux, use=klone+koi8acs,
 
 # Entry for the latin1 and latin2 fonts
-linux-lat|linux with latin1 or latin2 alternate character set,
+linux-lat|Linux with latin1 or latin2 alternate character set,
        acsc=+\020\,\021-\030.^Y0\333`\004a\013f\370g\361h\260i
             \316j\211k\214l\206m\203n\305o~p\304q\212r\304s_t\207u
             \215v\301w\302x\205y\363z\362{\343|\330}\234~\376,
@@ -1113,7 +1113,7 @@ linux-lat|linux with latin1 or latin2 alternate character set,
 # This uses graphics from VT codeset instead of from cp437.
 # reason: cp437 (aka "straight to font") is not functional under luit.
 # from: Andrey V Lukyanov <land@long.yar.ru>.
-linux-vt|linux console using VT codes for graphics,
+linux-vt|Linux console using VT codes for graphics,
        acsc=++\,\,--..00``aaffgghhiijjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxy
             yzz~~,
        rmacs=\E(K, rmpch@, sgr@, sgr0=\E[0m\E(K\017, smacs=\E(0,
@@ -1179,7 +1179,7 @@ fbterm|FbTerm for Linux with framebuffer,
 # For background, refer to the report on bug-ncurses:
 #
 # https://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/bug-ncurses/2019-10/msg00059.html
-linux-16color|linux console with 16 colors,
+linux-16color|Linux console with 16 colors,
        colors#16, ncv#42, pairs#0x100,
        setab=\E[4%p1%{8}%m%d%?%p1%{7}%>%t;5%e;25%;m,
        setaf=\E[3%p1%{8}%m%d%?%p1%{7}%>%t;1%e;22%;m,
@@ -1213,7 +1213,7 @@ bterm|bogl virtual terminal,
 #
 
 # From: Matthew Vernon <mcv21@pick.sel.cam.ac.uk>
-mach|Mach Console,
+mach|Mach console,
        am, km,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#25,
        bel=^G, blink=\E[5m, bold=\E[1m, clear=\Ec, cr=\r,
@@ -1227,9 +1227,9 @@ mach|Mach Console,
        kf9=\EOX, khome=\E[H, kich1=\E[@, kll=\E[F, knp=\E[U,
        kpp=\E[V, rev=\E[7m, rmso=\E[0m, rmul=\E[24m, sgr0=\E[0m,
        smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m,
-mach-bold|Mach Console with bold instead of underline,
+mach-bold|Mach console with bold instead of underline,
        rmul=\E[0m, smul=\E[1m, use=mach,
-mach-color|Mach Console with ANSI color,
+mach-color|Mach console with ANSI color,
        colors#8, pairs#64,
        dim=\E[2m, invis=\E[8m, op=\E[37;40m, rmso=\E[27m,
        setab=\E[4%p1%dm, setaf=\E[3%p1%dm, use=mach,
@@ -1250,7 +1250,7 @@ mach-gnu|GNU Mach,
            2%;%?%p6%t;1%;%?%p7%t;8%;m,
        use=ecma+index, use=mach,
 
-mach-gnu-color|Mach Console with ANSI color,
+mach-gnu-color|Mach console with ANSI color,
        colors#8, pairs#64,
        op=\E[37;40m, rmso=\E[27m, setab=\E[4%p1%dm,
        setaf=\E[3%p1%dm, use=mach-gnu,
@@ -1323,7 +1323,7 @@ hurd|The GNU Hurd console server,
 # optimization.  Bug: The <op> capability resets attributes.
 # From: Michael Hunter <mphunter@qnx.com> 30 Jul 1996
 # (removed: <sgr=%?%p1%t\E<%;%p2%t\E[%;%p3%t\E(%;%p4%t\E{%;%p6%t\E<%;,>)
-qnx|qnx4|qnx console,
+qnx|qnx4|QNX console,
        daisy, km, mir, msgr, xhpa, xt,
        colors#8, cols#80, it#4, lines#25, ncv#3, pairs#8,
        acsc=O\333a\261j\331k\277l\332m\300n\305o\337q\304s\334t
@@ -1405,7 +1405,7 @@ qnxtmono|Monochrome QNX4 terminal or console,
 # From: Federico Bianchi <bianchi@pc-arte2.arte.unipi.it>, 1 Jul 1998
 # (esr: commented out <scp> and <rmcup> to avoid warnings.)
 # (TD: derive from original qnx4 entry)
-qnxt2|qnx 2.15 serial terminal,
+qnxt2|QNX 2.15 serial terminal,
        am,
        civis@, cnorm@, cvvis@, dch1@, ich1@, kRES@, kRPL@, kUND@, kspd@,
        rep@, rmcup@, rmso=\E>, setb@, setf@, smcup@, smso=\E<, use=qnx4,
@@ -1743,49 +1743,49 @@ pcvtXX|pcvt vt200 emulator (DEC VT220),
 #      NetBSD/FreeBSD vt220 terminal emulator console (pc keyboard & monitor)
 #      termcap entries for pure VT220-Emulation and 25, 28, 35, 40, 43 and
 #      50 lines entries; 80 columns
-pcvt25|dec vt220 emulation with 25 lines,
+pcvt25|DEC vt220 emulation with 25 lines,
        cols#80, lines#25,
        is2=\E[1;25r\E[25;1H, use=pcvtXX,
-pcvt28|dec vt220 emulation with 28 lines,
+pcvt28|DEC vt220 emulation with 28 lines,
        cols#80, lines#28,
        is2=\E[1;28r\E[28;1H, use=pcvtXX,
-pcvt35|dec vt220 emulation with 35 lines,
+pcvt35|DEC vt220 emulation with 35 lines,
        cols#80, lines#35,
        is2=\E[1;35r\E[35;1H, use=pcvtXX,
-pcvt40|dec vt220 emulation with 40 lines,
+pcvt40|DEC vt220 emulation with 40 lines,
        cols#80, lines#40,
        is2=\E[1;40r\E[40;1H, use=pcvtXX,
-pcvt43|dec vt220 emulation with 43 lines,
+pcvt43|DEC vt220 emulation with 43 lines,
        cols#80, lines#43,
        is2=\E[1;43r\E[43;1H, use=pcvtXX,
-pcvt50|dec vt220 emulation with 50 lines,
+pcvt50|DEC vt220 emulation with 50 lines,
        cols#80, lines#50,
        is2=\E[1;50r\E[50;1H, use=pcvtXX,
 
 #      NetBSD/FreeBSD vt220 terminal emulator console (pc keyboard & monitor)
 #      termcap entries for pure VT220-Emulation and 25, 28, 35, 40, 43 and
 #      50 lines entries; 132 columns
-pcvt25w|dec vt220 emulation with 25 lines and 132 cols,
+pcvt25w|DEC vt220 emulation with 25 lines and 132 cols,
        cols#132, lines#25,
        is2=\E[1;25r\E[25;1H, use=pcvtXX,
-pcvt28w|dec vt220 emulation with 28 lines and 132 cols,
+pcvt28w|DEC vt220 emulation with 28 lines and 132 cols,
        cols#132, lines#28,
        is2=\E[1;28r\E[28;1H, use=pcvtXX,
-pcvt35w|dec vt220 emulation with 35 lines and 132 cols,
+pcvt35w|DEC vt220 emulation with 35 lines and 132 cols,
        cols#132, lines#35,
        is2=\E[1;35r\E[35;1H, use=pcvtXX,
-pcvt40w|dec vt220 emulation with 40 lines and 132 cols,
+pcvt40w|DEC vt220 emulation with 40 lines and 132 cols,
        cols#132, lines#40,
        is2=\E[1;40r\E[40;1H, use=pcvtXX,
-pcvt43w|dec vt220 emulation with 43 lines and 132 cols,
+pcvt43w|DEC vt220 emulation with 43 lines and 132 cols,
        cols#132, lines#43,
        is2=\E[1;43r\E[43;1H, use=pcvtXX,
-pcvt50w|dec vt220 emulation with 50 lines and 132 cols,
+pcvt50w|DEC vt220 emulation with 50 lines and 132 cols,
        cols#132, lines#50,
        is2=\E[1;50r\E[50;1H, use=pcvtXX,
 
 #      OpenBSD implements a color variation
-pcvt25-color|dec vt220 emulation with 25 lines and color,
+pcvt25-color|DEC vt220 emulation with 25 lines and color,
        cols#80, lines#25,
        is2=\E[1;25r\E[25;1H, kf1=\EOP, kf10=\E[29~, kf11=\E[23~,
        kf12=\E[24~, kf13=\E[25~, kf14=\E[26~, kf15=\E[28~,
@@ -1981,7 +1981,7 @@ mgterm|MGL/MGL2 MobileGear Graphic Library,
 #      F13-F24 are shifted F1-F12
 #      F25-F36 are control F1-F12
 #      F37-F48 are shift+control F1-F12
-cons25w|ansiw|ansi80x25-raw|freebsd console (25-line raw mode),
+cons25w|ansiw|ansi80x25-raw|FreeBSD console (25-line raw mode),
        am, bce, bw, eo, msgr, npc,
        colors#8, cols#80, it#8, lines#25, ncv#21, pairs#64,
        bel=^G, blink=\E[5m, bold=\E[1m, cbt=\E[Z, clear=\E[H\E[J,
@@ -2010,71 +2010,71 @@ cons25w|ansiw|ansi80x25-raw|freebsd console (25-line raw mode),
        sgr=\E[0%?%p1%t;2;7%;%?%p3%t;7%;%?%p4%t;5%;%?%p5%t;30;1%;%?
            %p6%t;1%;m,
        sgr0=\E[m, smso=\E[7m, vpa=\E[%i%p1%dd, use=ecma+index,
-cons25|ansis|ansi80x25|freebsd console (25-line ansi mode),
+cons25|ansis|ansi80x25|FreeBSD console (25-line ansi mode),
        acsc=-\030.^Y0\333`\004a\260f\370g\361h\261i\025j\331k\277l
             \332m\300n\305q\304t\303u\264v\301w\302x\263y\363z\362~
             \371,
        use=cons25w,
-cons25-debian|freebsd console with debian backspace (25-line ansi mode),
+cons25-debian|FreeBSD console with debian backspace (25-line ansi mode),
        kbs=^?, kdch1=\E[3~, use=cons25,
-cons25-m|ansis-mono|ansi80x25-mono|freebsd console (25-line mono ansi mode),
+cons25-m|ansis-mono|ansi80x25-mono|FreeBSD console (25-line mono ansi mode),
        colors@, pairs@,
        bold@, dim@, op@, rmul=\E[m, setab@, setaf@,
        sgr=\E[0%?%p1%t;2;7%;%?%p2%t;4%;%?%p3%t;7%;%?%p4%t;5%;m,
        smul=\E[4m, use=cons25,
-cons30|ansi80x30|freebsd console (30-line ansi mode),
+cons30|ansi80x30|FreeBSD console (30-line ansi mode),
        lines#30, use=cons25,
-cons30-m|ansi80x30-mono|freebsd console (30-line mono ansi mode),
+cons30-m|ansi80x30-mono|FreeBSD console (30-line mono ansi mode),
        lines#30, use=cons25-m,
-cons43|ansi80x43|freebsd console (43-line ansi mode),
+cons43|ansi80x43|FreeBSD console (43-line ansi mode),
        lines#43, use=cons25,
-cons43-m|ansi80x43-mono|freebsd console (43-line mono ansi mode),
+cons43-m|ansi80x43-mono|FreeBSD console (43-line mono ansi mode),
        lines#43, use=cons25-m,
-cons50|ansil|ansi80x50|freebsd console (50-line ansi mode),
+cons50|ansil|ansi80x50|FreeBSD console (50-line ansi mode),
        lines#50, use=cons25,
-cons50-m|ansil-mono|ansi80x50-mono|freebsd console (50-line mono ansi mode),
+cons50-m|ansil-mono|ansi80x50-mono|FreeBSD console (50-line mono ansi mode),
        lines#50, use=cons25-m,
-cons60|ansi80x60|freebsd console (60-line ansi mode),
+cons60|ansi80x60|FreeBSD console (60-line ansi mode),
        lines#60, use=cons25,
-cons60-m|ansi80x60-mono|freebsd console (60-line mono ansi mode),
+cons60-m|ansi80x60-mono|FreeBSD console (60-line mono ansi mode),
        lines#60, use=cons25-m,
-cons25r|pc3r|ibmpc3r|cons25-koi8-r|freebsd console w/koi8-r cyrillic,
+cons25r|pc3r|ibmpc3r|cons25-koi8-r|FreeBSD console w/koi8-r cyrillic,
        acsc=-\030.^Y0\215`\004a\220f\234h\221i\025j\205k\203l\202m
             \204n\212q\0t\206u\207v\211w\210x\201y\230z\231~
             \225,
        use=cons25w,
-cons25r-m|pc3r-m|ibmpc3r-mono|cons25-koi8r-m|freebsd console w/koi8-r cyrillic (mono),
+cons25r-m|pc3r-m|ibmpc3r-mono|cons25-koi8r-m|FreeBSD console w/koi8-r cyrillic (mono),
        colors@, pairs@,
        op@, rmul=\E[m, setab@, setaf@,
        sgr=\E[0%?%p1%t;2;7%;%?%p2%t;4%;%?%p3%t;7%;%?%p4%t;5%;%?%p5
            %t;30;1%;%?%p6%t;1%;m,
        smul=\E[4m, use=cons25r,
-cons50r|cons50-koi8r|freebsd console w/koi8-r cyrillic (50 lines),
+cons50r|cons50-koi8r|FreeBSD console w/koi8-r cyrillic (50 lines),
        lines#50, use=cons25r,
-cons50r-m|cons50-koi8r-m|freebsd console w/koi8-r cyrillic (50-line mono),
+cons50r-m|cons50-koi8r-m|FreeBSD console w/koi8-r cyrillic (50-line mono),
        lines#50, use=cons25r-m,
-cons60r|cons60-koi8r|freebsd console w/koi8-r cyrillic (60 lines),
+cons60r|cons60-koi8r|FreeBSD console w/koi8-r cyrillic (60 lines),
        lines#60, use=cons25r,
-cons60r-m|cons60-koi8r-m|freebsd console w/koi8-r cyrillic (60-line mono),
+cons60r-m|cons60-koi8r-m|FreeBSD console w/koi8-r cyrillic (60-line mono),
        lines#60, use=cons25r-m,
 # ISO 8859-1 FreeBSD console
-cons25l1|cons25-iso8859|freebsd console w/iso 8859-1 chars,
+cons25l1|cons25-iso8859|FreeBSD console w/iso 8859-1 chars,
        acsc=+\253\,\273-\030.\031`\201a\202f\207g\210i\247j\213k
             \214l\215m\216n\217o\220p\221q\222r\223s\224t\225u
             \226v\227w\230x\231y\232z\233~\237,
        use=cons25w,
-cons25l1-m|cons25-iso-m|freebsd console w/iso 8859-1 chars (mono),
+cons25l1-m|cons25-iso-m|FreeBSD console w/iso 8859-1 chars (mono),
        colors@, pairs@,
        bold@, dim@, op@, rmul=\E[m, setab@, setaf@,
        sgr=\E[0%?%p1%t;2;7%;%?%p2%t;4%;%?%p3%t;7%;%?%p4%t;5%;m,
        smul=\E[4m, use=cons25l1,
-cons50l1|cons50-iso8859|freebsd console w/iso 8859-1 chars (50 lines),
+cons50l1|cons50-iso8859|FreeBSD console w/iso 8859-1 chars (50 lines),
        lines#50, use=cons25l1,
-cons50l1-m|cons50-iso-m|freebsd console w/iso 8859-1 chars (50-line mono),
+cons50l1-m|cons50-iso-m|FreeBSD console w/iso 8859-1 chars (50-line mono),
        lines#50, use=cons25l1-m,
-cons60l1|cons60-iso|freebsd console w/iso 8859-1 chars (60 lines),
+cons60l1|cons60-iso|FreeBSD console w/iso 8859-1 chars (60 lines),
        lines#60, use=cons25l1,
-cons60l1-m|cons60-iso-m|freebsd console w/iso 8859-1 chars (60-line mono),
+cons60l1-m|cons60-iso-m|FreeBSD console w/iso 8859-1 chars (60-line mono),
        lines#60, use=cons25l1-m,
 
 # Starting with FreeBSD 8, an alternative configuration for syscons is provided,
@@ -2130,7 +2130,7 @@ teken|syscons with teken,
 # This was the original 386BSD console entry (I think).
 # Some places it's named oldpc3|oldibmpc3.
 # From: Alex R.N. Wetmore <aw2t@andrew.cmu.edu>
-origpc3|origibmpc3|IBM PC 386BSD Console,
+origpc3|origibmpc3|IBM PC 386BSD console,
        OTbs, am, bw, eo, xon,
        cols#80, lines#25,
        acsc=j\331k\277l\332m\300n\305q\304t\303u\264v\301w\302x
@@ -2143,7 +2143,7 @@ origpc3|origibmpc3|IBM PC 386BSD Console,
        smso=\E[1;7x\E[2;0x, smul=\E[1;7x\E[2;0x,
 
 # description of BSD/386 console emulator in version 1.0 (supplied by BSDI)
-oldpc3|oldibmpc3|old IBM PC BSD/386 Console,
+oldpc3|oldibmpc3|old IBM PC BSD/386 console,
        OTbs, km,
        lines#25,
        bel=^G, bold=\E[=15F, cr=\r, cud1=\n, dim=\E[=8F, dl1=\E[M,
@@ -2159,7 +2159,7 @@ oldpc3|oldibmpc3|old IBM PC BSD/386 Console,
 # "stty rows NN", e.g. to use 24 lines.
 # (Color support from Kevin Rosenberg <kevin@cyberport.com>, 2 May 1996)
 # Bug: The <op> capability resets attributes.
-bsdos-pc|IBM PC BSD/OS Console,
+bsdos-pc|IBM PC BSD/OS console,
        sgr=\E[0;10%?%p1%t;7%;%?%p2%t;1%;%?%p3%t;7%;%?%p4%t;5%;%?%p6
            %t;1%;%?%p7%t;8%;%?%p9%t;11%;m,
        use=bsdos-pc-nobold,
@@ -2182,17 +2182,17 @@ bsdos-pc-m|bsdos-pc-mono|BSD/OS PC console mono,
        use=klone+sgr8,
 
 # Old names for BSD/OS PC console used in releases before 4.1.
-pc3|BSD/OS on the PC Console,
+pc3|BSD/OS on the PC console,
        use=bsdos-pc-nobold,
-ibmpc3|pc3-bold|BSD/OS on the PC Console with bold instead of underline,
+ibmpc3|pc3-bold|BSD/OS on the PC console with bold instead of underline,
        use=bsdos-pc,
 
 # BSD/OS on the SPARC
-bsdos-sparc|Sun SPARC BSD/OS Console,
+bsdos-sparc|Sun SPARC BSD/OS console,
        use=sun,
 
 # BSD/OS on the PowerPC
-bsdos-ppc|PowerPC BSD/OS Console,
+bsdos-ppc|PowerPC BSD/OS console,
        use=bsdos-pc,
 
 
@@ -2214,7 +2214,7 @@ bsdos-ppc|PowerPC BSD/OS Console,
 # not be used as a guide to the capabilities of the vt52.  Note in particular
 # that vt52 does not support line-drawing characters (the scan-X values refer
 # to a crude plotting feature) -TD
-vt52|dec vt52,
+vt52|DEC vt52,
        OTbs,
        it#8, lines#24,
        acsc=+h.k0affggolpnqprrss, home=\EH, kbs=^H, nel=\r\n,
@@ -2341,12 +2341,12 @@ vt52-basic|vt52 for emulators,
 # terminfo guidelines.  That is a compromise used to assign the remaining
 # keys on the keypad to kf5-kf0, used on older systems with legacy termcap
 # support:
-vt100+keypad|dec vt100 numeric keypad no fkeys,
+vt100+keypad|DEC vt100 numeric keypad no fkeys,
        ka1=\EOq, ka3=\EOs, kb2=\EOr, kc1=\EOp, kc3=\EOn,
-vt100+pfkeys|dec vt100 numeric keypad,
+vt100+pfkeys|DEC vt100 numeric keypad,
        kent=\EOM, kf1=\EOP, kf2=\EOQ, kf3=\EOR, kf4=\EOS,
        use=vt100+keypad,
-vt100+fnkeys|dec vt100 numeric keypad,
+vt100+fnkeys|DEC vt100 numeric keypad,
        kf0=\EOy, kf10=\EOx, kf5=\EOt, kf6=\EOu, kf7=\EOv, kf8=\EOl,
        kf9=\EOw, use=vt100+pfkeys,
 #
@@ -2371,7 +2371,7 @@ vt100+fnkeys|dec vt100 numeric keypad,
 #  |        $Op        |  $On    |         |
 #  |___________________|_________|_kent_@8_|
 #
-vt220+keypad|dec vt220 numeric keypad,
+vt220+keypad|DEC vt220 numeric keypad,
        ka1=\EOw, ka3=\EOy, kb2=\EOu, kc1=\EOq, kc3=\EOs, kent=\EOM,
        kf1=\EOP, kf2=\EOQ, kf3=\EOR, kf4=\EOS, ka2=\EOx, kb1=\EOt,
        kb3=\EOv, kc2=\EOr,
@@ -2415,7 +2415,7 @@ vt102+enq|ncurses extension for vt102-style ENQ,
 #      INTERLACE_OFF
 #
 # (vt100: I added <rmam>/<smam> based on the init string, also <OTbs>. -- esr)
-vt100|vt100-am|dec vt100 (w/advanced video),
+vt100|vt100-am|DEC vt100 (w/advanced video),
        OTbs, mc5i, xenl, xon,
        vt#3,
        csr=\E[%i%p1%d;%p2%dr, kcub1=\EOD, kcud1=\EOB,
@@ -2427,7 +2427,7 @@ vt100|vt100-am|dec vt100 (w/advanced video),
            %;m%?%p9%t\016%e\017%;$<2>,
        smam=\E[?7h, smkx=\E[?1h\E=, smso=\E[7m$<2>,
        use=vt100+4bsd, use=vt100+fnkeys,
-vt100+4bsd|dec vt100 from 4.0BSD,
+vt100+4bsd|DEC vt100 from 4.0BSD,
        am, msgr,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -2447,14 +2447,14 @@ vt100+4bsd|dec vt100 from 4.0BSD,
 vt100nam|vt100-nam|vt100 no automargins,
        am@, xenl@,
        rs2=\E>\E[?3l\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?7l\E[?8h, use=vt100-am,
-vt100-vb|dec vt100 (w/advanced video) & no beep,
+vt100-vb|DEC vt100 (w/advanced video) & no beep,
        bel@, flash=\E[?5h$<100/>\E[?5l, use=vt100,
 
 # Ordinary vt100 in 132 column ("wide") mode.
-vt100-w|vt100-w-am|dec vt100 132 cols (w/advanced video),
+vt100-w|vt100-w-am|DEC vt100 132 cols (w/advanced video),
        cols#132, lines#24,
        rs2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?8h, use=vt100-am,
-vt100-w-nam|vt100-nam-w|dec vt100 132 cols (w/advanced video no automargin),
+vt100-w-nam|vt100-nam-w|DEC vt100 132 cols (w/advanced video no automargin),
        cols#132, lines#14, vt@,
        rs2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?8h, use=vt100-nam,
 
@@ -2463,7 +2463,7 @@ vt100-nav|vt100 without advanced video option,
        xmc#1,
        blink@, bold@, rev@, rmso=\E[m, rmul@, sgr@, sgr0@, smso=\E[7m,
        smul@, use=vt100,
-vt100-nav-w|vt100-w-nav|dec vt100 132 cols 14 lines (no advanced video option),
+vt100-nav-w|vt100-w-nav|DEC vt100 132 cols 14 lines (no advanced video option),
        cols#132, lines#14, use=vt100-nav,
 
 # vt100 with one of the 24 lines used as a status line.
@@ -2487,10 +2487,10 @@ vt100-s-bot|vt100-bot-s|vt100 for use with bottom sysline,
 # Most of the `vt100' emulators out there actually emulate a vt102
 # This entry (or vt102-nsgr) is probably the right thing to use for
 # these.
-vt102|dec vt102,
+vt102|DEC vt102,
        dch1=\E[P, dl1=\E[M, il1=\E[L, rmir=\E[4l, smir=\E[4h,
        use=vt100,
-vt102-w|dec vt102 in wide mode,
+vt102-w|DEC vt102 in wide mode,
        cols#132,
        rs3=\E[?3h, use=vt102,
 
@@ -2513,7 +2513,7 @@ vt125|vt125 graphics terminal,
 
 # This isn't a DEC entry, it came from University of Wisconsin.
 # (vt131: I added <rmam>/<smam> based on the init string, also <OTbs> -- esr)
-vt131|dec vt131,
+vt131|DEC vt131,
        OTbs, am, xenl,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, vt#3,
        bel=^G, blink=\E[5m$<2/>, bold=\E[1m$<2/>,
@@ -2635,12 +2635,12 @@ vt220-base|DEC VT220 as emulated,
        sgr0=\E[m\E(B, smacs=\E(0$<2>, smam=\E[?7h, smir=\E[4h,
        smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m, tbc=\E[3g, use=vt220+vtedit,
        use=ansi+pp, use=ansi+enq,
-vt220|vt200|dec vt220,
+vt220|vt200|DEC vt220,
        use=vt220+cvis, use=vt220-base,
 vt220-w|vt200-w|DEC vt220 in wide mode,
        cols#132,
        rs3=\E[?3h, use=vt220,
-vt220-8bit|vt220-8|vt200-8bit|vt200-8|dec vt220/200 in 8-bit mode,
+vt220-8bit|vt220-8|vt200-8bit|vt200-8|DEC vt220/200 in 8-bit mode,
        OTbs, am, mc5i, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, vt#3,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -2703,7 +2703,7 @@ vt220-nam|v200-nam|VT220 in vt100 mode with no auto margins,
 # From: Alexander Latzko <latzko@marsenius.rutgers.edu>, 30 Dec 1996
 # (Added vt100 <rc>,<sc> to quiet a tic warning -- esr)
 # added msgr -TD
-vt200-js|vt220-js|dec vt200 series with jump scroll,
+vt200-js|vt220-js|DEC vt200 series with jump scroll,
        am, msgr,
        cols#80,
        bel=^G, clear=\E[H\E[J, cr=\r, csr=\E[%i%p1%d;%p2%dr,
@@ -2744,7 +2744,7 @@ vt320nam|v320n|DEC VT320 in vt100 emul. mode with NO AUTO WRAP mode,
 # to SMASH the 1k-barrier...
 # From: Adam Thompson <athompso@pangea.ca> Sept 10 1995
 # (vt320: uncommented <fsl> --esr)
-vt320|vt300|dec vt320 7 bit terminal,
+vt320|vt300|DEC vt320 7 bit terminal,
        am, hs, mir, msgr, xenl,
        cols#80, lines#24, wsl#80,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -2774,16 +2774,16 @@ vt320|vt300|dec vt320 7 bit terminal,
        smkx=\E[?1h\E=, smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m, tbc=\E[3g,
        use=dec+pp, use=vt220+cvis, use=vt220+keypad, use=dec+sl,
        use=ansi+enq,
-vt320-nam|vt300-nam|dec vt320 7 bit terminal with no am to make SAS happy,
+vt320-nam|vt300-nam|DEC vt320 7 bit terminal with no am to make SAS happy,
        am@,
        is2=\E>\E[?3l\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?7l\E[?8h\E[1;24r\E[24;1H,
        rs2=\E>\E[?3l\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?7l\E[?8h\E[1;24r\E[24;1H, use=vt320,
 # We have to init 132-col mode, not 80-col mode.
-vt320-w|vt300-w|dec vt320 wide 7 bit terminal,
+vt320-w|vt300-w|DEC vt320 wide 7 bit terminal,
        cols#132, wsl#132,
        is2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?7h\E[?8h\E[1;24r\E[24;1H,
        rs2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?7h\E[?8h\E[1;24r\E[24;1H, use=vt320,
-vt320-w-nam|vt300-w-nam|dec vt320 wide 7 bit terminal with no am,
+vt320-w-nam|vt300-w-nam|DEC vt320 wide 7 bit terminal with no am,
        am@,
        is2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?7l\E[?8h\E[1;24r\E[24;1H,
        rs2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?7l\E[?8h\E[1;24r\E[24;1H, use=vt320-w,
@@ -2808,7 +2808,7 @@ vt320-w-nam|vt300-w-nam|dec vt320 wide 7 bit terminal with no am,
 # From: Daniel Glasser <dag@persoft.persoft.com>, 13 Oct 1993
 # (vt340: string capability "sb=\E[M" corrected to "sr";
 # also, added <rmam>/<smam> based on the init string -- esr)
-vt340|dec-vt340|vt330|dec-vt330|dec vt340 graphics terminal with 24 line page,
+vt340|dec-vt340|vt330|dec-vt330|DEC vt340 graphics terminal with 24 line page,
        am, eslok, hs, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, vt#3,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -2862,7 +2862,7 @@ vt420+lrmm|VT420 left/right margins,
 # From: Daniel Glasser <dag@persoft.persoft.com>, 13 Oct 1993
 # (vt400: string capability ":sb=\E[M:" corrected to ":sr=\E[M:";
 # also, added <rmam>/<smam> based on the init string -- esr)
-vt400|vt400-24|dec-vt400|dec vt400 24x80 column autowrap,
+vt400|vt400-24|dec-vt400|DEC vt400 24x80 column autowrap,
        am, eslok, hs, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, vt#3,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -2920,7 +2920,7 @@ vt420|DEC VT420,
        sgr0=\E[m\E(B$<2>, smacs=\E(0$<2>, smam=\E[?7h,
        smir=\E[4h, smkx=\E=, smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m, tbc=\E[3g,
        use=vt220+vtedit, use=ansi+pp, use=dec+sl, use=ansi+enq,
-       use=vt220+cvis,
+       use=vt220+cvis, use=vt420+lrmm,
 
 # DEC VT220 and up support DECUDK (user-defined keys).  DECUDK (i.e., pfx)
 # takes two parameters, the key and the string.  Translating the key is
@@ -3032,11 +3032,11 @@ dec-vt220|DOS tnvt200 terminal emulator,
 # I can send the address if requested.
 # (z340: changed garbled \E[5?l to \E[?5l, DEC smooth scroll off -- esr)
 # From: Adam Thompson <athompso@pangea.ca> Sept 10 1995
-z340|zstem vt340 terminal emulator 132col 42line,
+z340|ZSTEM vt340 terminal emulator 132col 42line,
        lines#42,
        is2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?7h\E[?8h\E[1;42r\E[42;1H,
        rs2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?7h\E[?8h\E[1;42r\E[42;1H, use=vt320-w,
-z340-nam|zstem vt340 terminal emulator 132col 42line (no automatic margins),
+z340-nam|ZSTEM vt340 terminal emulator 132col 42line (no automatic margins),
        am@,
        is2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?7l\E[?8h\E[1;42r\E[42;1H,
        rs2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?7l\E[?8h\E[1;42r\E[42;1H, use=z340,
@@ -3739,7 +3739,7 @@ iTerm2.app|iterm2|terminal emulator for Mac OS X,
 # color-bold entries do not include size information.
 
 # The '+' entries are building blocks
-xnuppc+basic|Darwin PowerPC Console basic capabilities,
+xnuppc+basic|Darwin PowerPC console basic capabilities,
        am, bce, mir, xenl,
        it#8,
        bold=\E[1m, clear=\E[H\E[J, cr=\r, csr=\E[%i%p1%d;%p2%dr,
@@ -3755,162 +3755,162 @@ xnuppc+basic|Darwin PowerPC Console basic capabilities,
        sgr0=\E[m, smam=\E[?7h, smkx=\E[?1h\E=, smso=\E[7m,
        smul=\E[4m, tbc=\E[3g, use=vt100+keypad,
 
-xnuppc+c|Darwin PowerPC Console ANSI color support,
+xnuppc+c|Darwin PowerPC console ANSI color support,
        colors#8, ncv#32, pairs#64,
        op=\E[37;40m, setab=\E[4%p1%dm, setaf=\E[3%p1%dm,
 
-xnuppc+b|Darwin PowerPC Console color-bold support,
+xnuppc+b|Darwin PowerPC console color-bold support,
        ncv#32,
        bold=\E[35m,
        sgr=\E[0%?%p6%t;35%;%?%p2%t;4%;%?%p1%p3%|%t;7%;m,
        use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc+f|Darwin PowerPC Console fancy color support,
+xnuppc+f|Darwin PowerPC console fancy color support,
        ncv#35,
        sgr=\E[0%?%p6%t;35%;%?%p2%t;36;4%;%?%p1%t;33;44%;%?%p3%t;7%;
            m,
        smso=\E[33;44m, smul=\E[36;4m, use=xnuppc+b,
 
-xnuppc+f2|Darwin PowerPC Console alternate fancy color support,
+xnuppc+f2|Darwin PowerPC console alternate fancy color support,
        ncv#35,
        bold=\E[33m,
        sgr=\E[0%?%p6%t;33%;%?%p2%t;34%;%?%p1%t;31;47%;%?%p3%t;7%;m,
        smso=\E[31;47m, smul=\E[34m, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
 # Building blocks for specific screen sizes
-xnuppc+80x25|Darwin PowerPC Console 80x25 support (640x400 pixels),
+xnuppc+80x25|Darwin PowerPC console 80x25 support (640x400 pixels),
        cols#80, lines#25,
 
-xnuppc+80x30|Darwin PowerPC Console 80x30 support (640x480 pixels),
+xnuppc+80x30|Darwin PowerPC console 80x30 support (640x480 pixels),
        cols#80, lines#30,
 
-xnuppc+90x30|Darwin PowerPC Console 90x30 support (720x480 pixels),
+xnuppc+90x30|Darwin PowerPC console 90x30 support (720x480 pixels),
        cols#90, lines#30,
 
-xnuppc+100x37|Darwin PowerPC Console 100x37 support (800x600 pixels),
+xnuppc+100x37|Darwin PowerPC console 100x37 support (800x600 pixels),
        cols#100, lines#37,
 
-xnuppc+112x37|Darwin PowerPC Console 112x37 support (896x600 pixels),
+xnuppc+112x37|Darwin PowerPC console 112x37 support (896x600 pixels),
        cols#112, lines#37,
 
-xnuppc+128x40|Darwin PowerPC Console 128x40 support (1024x640 pixels),
+xnuppc+128x40|Darwin PowerPC console 128x40 support (1024x640 pixels),
        cols#128, lines#40,
 
-xnuppc+128x48|Darwin PowerPC Console 128x48 support (1024x768 pixels),
+xnuppc+128x48|Darwin PowerPC console 128x48 support (1024x768 pixels),
        cols#128, lines#48,
 
-xnuppc+144x48|Darwin PowerPC Console 144x48 support (1152x768 pixels),
+xnuppc+144x48|Darwin PowerPC console 144x48 support (1152x768 pixels),
        cols#144, lines#48,
 
-xnuppc+160x64|Darwin PowerPC Console 160x64 support (1280x1024 pixels),
+xnuppc+160x64|Darwin PowerPC console 160x64 support (1280x1024 pixels),
        cols#160, lines#64,
 
-xnuppc+200x64|Darwin PowerPC Console 200x64 support (1600x1024 pixels),
+xnuppc+200x64|Darwin PowerPC console 200x64 support (1600x1024 pixels),
        cols#200, lines#64,
 
-xnuppc+200x75|Darwin PowerPC Console 200x75 support (1600x1200 pixels),
+xnuppc+200x75|Darwin PowerPC console 200x75 support (1600x1200 pixels),
        cols#200, lines#75,
 
-xnuppc+256x96|Darwin PowerPC Console 256x96 support (2048x1536 pixels),
+xnuppc+256x96|Darwin PowerPC console 256x96 support (2048x1536 pixels),
        cols#0x100, lines#96,
 
 # These are different combinations of the building blocks
 
-xnuppc-m|darwin-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome),
+xnuppc-m|darwin-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome),
        use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc|darwin|Darwin PowerPC Console (color),
+xnuppc|darwin|Darwin PowerPC console (color),
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-m-b|darwin-m-b|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome w/color-bold),
+xnuppc-m-b|darwin-m-b|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome w/color-bold),
        use=xnuppc+b,
 
-xnuppc-b|darwin-b|Darwin PowerPC Console (color w/color-bold),
+xnuppc-b|darwin-b|Darwin PowerPC console (color w/color-bold),
        use=xnuppc+b, use=xnuppc+c,
 
-xnuppc-m-f|darwin-m-f|Darwin PowerPC Console (fancy monochrome),
+xnuppc-m-f|darwin-m-f|Darwin PowerPC console (fancy monochrome),
        use=xnuppc+f,
 
-xnuppc-f|darwin-f|Darwin PowerPC Console (fancy color),
+xnuppc-f|darwin-f|Darwin PowerPC console (fancy color),
        use=xnuppc+f, use=xnuppc+c,
 
-xnuppc-m-f2|darwin-m-f2|Darwin PowerPC Console (alternate fancy monochrome),
+xnuppc-m-f2|darwin-m-f2|Darwin PowerPC console (alternate fancy monochrome),
        use=xnuppc+f2,
 
-xnuppc-f2|darwin-f2|Darwin PowerPC Console (alternate fancy color),
+xnuppc-f2|darwin-f2|Darwin PowerPC console (alternate fancy color),
        use=xnuppc+f2, use=xnuppc+c,
 
 # Combinations for specific screen sizes
-xnuppc-80x25-m|darwin-80x25-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 80x25,
+xnuppc-80x25-m|darwin-80x25-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 80x25,
        use=xnuppc+80x25, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-80x25|darwin-80x25|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 80x25,
+xnuppc-80x25|darwin-80x25|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 80x25,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+80x25, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-80x30-m|darwin-80x30-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 80x30,
+xnuppc-80x30-m|darwin-80x30-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 80x30,
        use=xnuppc+80x30, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-80x30|darwin-80x30|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 80x30,
+xnuppc-80x30|darwin-80x30|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 80x30,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+80x30, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-90x30-m|darwin-90x30-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 90x30,
+xnuppc-90x30-m|darwin-90x30-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 90x30,
        use=xnuppc+90x30, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-90x30|darwin-90x30|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 90x30,
+xnuppc-90x30|darwin-90x30|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 90x30,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+90x30, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-100x37-m|darwin-100x37-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 100x37,
+xnuppc-100x37-m|darwin-100x37-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 100x37,
        use=xnuppc+100x37, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-100x37|darwin-100x37|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 100x37,
+xnuppc-100x37|darwin-100x37|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 100x37,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+100x37, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-112x37-m|darwin-112x37-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 112x37,
+xnuppc-112x37-m|darwin-112x37-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 112x37,
        use=xnuppc+112x37, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-112x37|darwin-112x37|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 112x37,
+xnuppc-112x37|darwin-112x37|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 112x37,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+112x37, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-128x40-m|darwin-128x40-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 128x40,
+xnuppc-128x40-m|darwin-128x40-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 128x40,
        use=xnuppc+128x40, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-128x40|darwin-128x40|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 128x40,
+xnuppc-128x40|darwin-128x40|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 128x40,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+128x40, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-128x48-m|darwin-128x48-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 128x48,
+xnuppc-128x48-m|darwin-128x48-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 128x48,
        use=xnuppc+128x48, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-128x48|darwin-128x48|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 128x48,
+xnuppc-128x48|darwin-128x48|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 128x48,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+128x48, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-144x48-m|darwin-144x48-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 144x48,
+xnuppc-144x48-m|darwin-144x48-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 144x48,
        use=xnuppc+144x48, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-144x48|darwin-144x48|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 144x48,
+xnuppc-144x48|darwin-144x48|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 144x48,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+144x48, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-160x64-m|darwin-160x64-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 160x64,
+xnuppc-160x64-m|darwin-160x64-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 160x64,
        use=xnuppc+160x64, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-160x64|darwin-160x64|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 160x64,
+xnuppc-160x64|darwin-160x64|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 160x64,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+160x64, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-200x64-m|darwin-200x64-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 200x64,
+xnuppc-200x64-m|darwin-200x64-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 200x64,
        use=xnuppc+200x64, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-200x64|darwin-200x64|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 200x64,
+xnuppc-200x64|darwin-200x64|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 200x64,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+200x64, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-200x75-m|darwin-200x75-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 200x75,
+xnuppc-200x75-m|darwin-200x75-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 200x75,
        use=xnuppc+200x75, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-200x75|darwin-200x75|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 200x75,
+xnuppc-200x75|darwin-200x75|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 200x75,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+200x75, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-256x96-m|darwin-256x96-m|Darwin PowerPC Console (monochrome) 256x96,
+xnuppc-256x96-m|darwin-256x96-m|Darwin PowerPC console (monochrome) 256x96,
        use=xnuppc+256x96, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
-xnuppc-256x96|darwin-256x96|Darwin PowerPC Console (color) 256x96,
+xnuppc-256x96|darwin-256x96|Darwin PowerPC console (color) 256x96,
        use=xnuppc+c, use=xnuppc+256x96, use=xnuppc+basic,
 
 ######## DOS/WINDOWS
@@ -3993,7 +3993,7 @@ scrt|securecrt|SecureCRT emulating xterm-256color,
 #      Double-size characters
 #      Xterm extensions for mouse support
 #      Emulates VT52, VT100, VT220, VT320, ansi, xterm, qnx, scoansi,
-#      ANSIBBS, WYSE60, Televideo 950.
+#      ANSIBBS, WYSE60, TeleVideo 950.
 #
 # Default:
 #      TERM=xterm
@@ -4389,7 +4389,7 @@ teraterm|Tera Term,
 #    but that is not unusual for vt100 "emulators".
 # b) Does not implement vt100 keypad
 # c) Recognizes a subset of vt52 controls.
-ms-vt100|MS telnet imitating dec vt100,
+ms-vt100|MS telnet imitating DEC vt100,
        lines#25,
        acsc=+\020\,\021-\030.^Y0\333`\004a\261f\370g\361h\260i
             \316j\331k\277l\332m\300n\305o~p\304q\304r\304s_t\303u
@@ -4787,13 +4787,13 @@ xterm-xf86-v43|xterm terminal emulator (XFree86 4.3 Window System),
 # the hardware terminals, or for more recent emulators, e.g., xterm.
 vt220+cvis|DECTCEM VT220 cursor-visibility,
        civis=\E[?25l, cnorm=\E[?25h,
-vt220+cvis8|8-bit variant,
+vt220+cvis8|8-bit DECTCEM VT220 cursor-visibility,
        civis=\233?25l, cnorm=\233?25h,
 # The cvvis capability was unused in the SVr4 terminal descriptions for the
 # AT&T terminals, and there are no available documents as of 2021 which can
 # provide that it would have worked.  The first block is used for those 1980s
 # terminals; the second is used for terminals whose behavior can be verified.
-att610+cvis0|ATT 610 cursor-visibility,
+att610+cvis0|AT&T 610 cursor-visibility,
        civis=\E[?25l, cnorm=\E[?25h\E[?12l,
 att610+cvis|xterm cursor-visibility in XFree86 4.4,
        civis=\E[?25l, cnorm=\E[?12l\E[?25h, cvvis=\E[?12;25h,
@@ -5258,9 +5258,9 @@ xterm+indirect|xterm with direct-color indexing (old),
        setb@, setf@,
 konsole-direct|konsole with direct-color indexing,
        use=xterm+indirect, use=konsole,
-st-direct|st with direct-color indexing,
+st-direct|simpleterm with direct-color indexing,
        use=xterm+indirect, use=st,
-vte-direct|vte with direct-color indexing,
+vte-direct|VTE with direct-color indexing,
        use=xterm+indirect, use=vte,
 # reportedly in Apple's Mohave (fall 2018), but untested -TD
 nsterm-direct|nsterm with direct-color indexing,
@@ -5459,7 +5459,7 @@ xterm-vt220|xterm emulating vt220,
        use=xterm+sm+1006, use=xterm+tmux, use=xterm+keypad,
        use=xterm-basic,
 
-xterm-vt52|xterm emulating dec vt52,
+xterm-vt52|xterm emulating DEC vt52,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
        bel=^G, clear=\EH\EJ, cr=\r, cub1=\ED, cud1=\EB, cuf1=\EC,
@@ -6222,7 +6222,7 @@ konsole-base|KDE console window,
 #
 # As of 2018, konsole still provides 3 keyboard profiles ("XFree 4", "linux",
 # "solaris").
-konsole-linux|KDE console window with linux keyboard,
+konsole-linux|KDE console window with Linux keyboard,
        kf1=\E[[A, kf10=\E[21~, kf11=\E[23~, kf12=\E[24~, kf13@,
        kf14@, kf15@, kf16@, kf17@, kf18@, kf19@, kf2=\E[[B, kf20@,
        kf3=\E[[C, kf4=\E[[D, kf5=\E[[E, kf6=\E[17~, kf7=\E[18~,
@@ -6717,7 +6717,7 @@ xiterm|internationalized terminal emulator for X,
 # HP ships this (HPUX 9 and 10), except for the pb#9600 which was merged in
 # from BSD termcap.  (hpterm:  added empty <acsc>, we have no idea what ACS
 # chars look like --esr)
-hpterm|X-hpterm|hp X11 terminal emulator,
+hpterm|X-hpterm|HP X11 terminal emulator,
        am, da, db, mir, xhp, xon,
        cols#80, lh#2, lines#24, lm#0, lw#8, nlab#8, pb#9600, xmc#0,
        acsc=, bel=^G, bold=\E&dB, cbt=\Ei, clear=\E&a0y0C\EJ, cr=\r,
@@ -6761,7 +6761,7 @@ hpterm-color|HP X11 terminal emulator with color,
 #
 # This version, which came from Martin Trusler, was tested with lynx using
 # ncurses 5.4
-hpterm-color2|X-hpterm-color2|hp X11 terminal emulator with color,
+hpterm-color2|X-hpterm-color2|HP X11 terminal emulator with color,
        OTbs, am, ccc, da, db, km, mir, xhp,
        colors#8, cols#80, it#8, lh#2, lines#24, lm#0, lw#8, nlab#8,
        pairs#8, xmc#0,
@@ -7170,7 +7170,7 @@ st-0.6|simpleterm 0.6,
 # - shifted cursor-keys send sequences like rxvt
 # - sgr referred to unimplemented "invis" mode.
 # Fixes: add eo and xenl per tack, remove nonworking cbt, hts and tbc, invis
-simpleterm|old-st| simpleterm 0.1.1,
+simpleterm|old-st|simpleterm 0.1.1,
        am, eo, mir, msgr, ul, xenl,
        colors#8, cols#80, it#8, lines#24, ncv#3, pairs#64,
        acsc=``aaffggiijjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -8058,7 +8058,7 @@ screen.konsole|screen in KDE console window,
        use=xterm+x11mouse, use=screen+italics,
        use=screen+fkeys, use=konsole,
 # fix the backspace key
-screen.linux|screen.linux-s|screen in linux console,
+screen.linux|screen.linux-s|screen in Linux console,
        bw,
        kbs=^?, kcbt@, use=linux+sfkeys, use=xterm+x11mouse,
        use=screen+fkeys, use=screen4,
@@ -8098,7 +8098,7 @@ screen-bce.gnome|screen optimized for GNOME-Terminal,
 screen-bce.konsole|screen optimized for KDE console window,
        bce,
        ech@, use=screen+italics, use=screen.konsole,
-screen-bce.linux|screen optimized for linux console,
+screen-bce.linux|screen optimized for Linux console,
        bce,
        ech@, use=screen.linux,
 
@@ -8523,7 +8523,7 @@ sun-color|Sun Microsystems Workstation console with color support (IA systems),
 # See the note on Iris extensions near the end of this file.
 # Finally, removed suboptimal <clear>=\EH\EJ and added <cud1> &
 # <flash> from BRL -- esr)
-wsiris|iris40|iris emulating a 40 line visual 50 (approximately),
+wsiris|iris40|IRIS emulating a 40 line Visual 50 (approximately),
        OTbs, OTnc, OTpt, am,
        OTkn#3, cols#80, it#8, lines#40,
        OTnl=\EB, bel=^G, clear=\Ev, cnorm=\E>, cub1=^H, cud1=\EB,
@@ -8599,7 +8599,7 @@ nextshell|NeXT Shell application,
 #
 
 # (news-unk: this had :KB=news: -- esr)
-news-unk|SONY NEWS vt100 emulator common entry,
+news-unk|Sony NEWS vt100 emulator common entry,
        OTbs, OTpt, am, xenl,
        cols#80,
        OTnl=\n, bel=^G, blink=\E[5m, bold=\E[1m, clear=\E[H\E[2J,
@@ -8616,39 +8616,39 @@ news-unk|SONY NEWS vt100 emulator common entry,
        sgr0=\E[m, smkx=\E[?1h\E=, smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m,
 #
 # (news-29: this had :TY=ascii: --esr)
-news-29|SONY NEWS vt100 emulator with 29 lines,
+news-29|Sony NEWS vt100 emulator with 29 lines,
        lines#29, use=news-unk,
 # (news-29-euc: this had :TY=euc: --esr)
-news-29-euc|SONY NEWS vt100 emulator with 29 lines and EUC,
+news-29-euc|Sony NEWS vt100 emulator with 29 lines and EUC,
        use=news-29,
 # (news-29-sjis: this had :TY=sjis: --esr)
-news-29-sjis|SONY NEWS vt100 emulator with 29 lines and SJIS,
+news-29-sjis|Sony NEWS vt100 emulator with 29 lines and SJIS,
        use=news-29,
 #
 # (news-33: this had :TY=ascii: --esr)
-news-33|SONY NEWS vt100 with 33 lines,
+news-33|Sony NEWS vt100 with 33 lines,
        lines#33, use=news-unk,
 # (news-33-euc: this had :TY=euc: --esr)
-news-33-euc|SONY NEWS vt100 with 33 lines and EUC,
+news-33-euc|Sony NEWS vt100 with 33 lines and EUC,
        use=news-33,
 # (news-33-sjis: this had :TY=sjis: --esr)
-news-33-sjis|SONY NEWS vt100 with 33 lines and SJIS,
+news-33-sjis|Sony NEWS vt100 with 33 lines and SJIS,
        use=news-33,
 #
 # (news-42: this had :TY=ascii: --esr)
-news-42|SONY NEWS vt100 with 42 lines,
+news-42|Sony NEWS vt100 with 42 lines,
        lines#42, use=news-unk,
 # (news-42-euc: this had :TY=euc: --esr)
-news-42-euc|SONY NEWS vt100 with 42 lines and EUC,
+news-42-euc|Sony NEWS vt100 with 42 lines and EUC,
        use=news-42,
 # (news-42-sjis: this had :TY=sjis: --esr)
-news-42-sjis|SONY NEWS vt100 with 42 lines and SJIS,
+news-42-sjis|Sony NEWS vt100 with 42 lines and SJIS,
        use=news-42,
 #
 #      NEWS-OS old termcap entry
 #
 # (news-old-unk: this had :KB=news:TY=sjis: --esr)
-news-old-unk|SONY NEWS vt100 emulator common entry,
+news-old-unk|Sony NEWS vt100 emulator common entry,
        OTbs, OTpt, am, xenl,
        cols#80, vt#3,
        OTnl=\n, bel=^G, blink=\E[5m, bold=\E[1m, clear=\E[;H\E[2J,
@@ -8662,7 +8662,7 @@ news-old-unk|SONY NEWS vt100 emulator common entry,
        sgr0=\E[m, smkx=\E[?1h\E=, smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m,
 #
 # (nwp512: this had :DE=^H:, which I think means <OTbs> --esr)
-nwp512|news|nwp514|news40|vt100-bm|old sony vt100 emulator 40 lines,
+nwp512|news|nwp514|news40|vt100-bm|old Sony vt100 emulator 40 lines,
        OTbs,
        lines#40,
        is2=\E7\E[r\E8\EE\EE\EE\EM\EM\EM\E[?7h\E[?1l\E[?3l\E7\E[1;40
@@ -8670,13 +8670,13 @@ nwp512|news|nwp514|news40|vt100-bm|old sony vt100 emulator 40 lines,
        use=news-old-unk,
 #
 # (nwp512-a: this had :TY=ascii: and the alias vt100-bm --esr)
-nwp512-a|nwp514-a|news-a|news42|news40-a|sony vt100 emulator 42 line,
+nwp512-a|nwp514-a|news-a|news42|news40-a|Sony vt100 emulator 42 line,
        lines#42,
        is2=\E[?7h\E[?1l\E[?3l\E7\E[1;42r\E8,
        use=news-old-unk,
 #
 # (nwp-512-o: this had :KB=nwp410:DE=^H:  I interpret the latter as <OTbs>. --esr)
-nwp512-o|nwp514-o|news-o|news40-o|vt100-bm-o|sony vt100 emulator 40 lines,
+nwp512-o|nwp514-o|news-o|news40-o|vt100-bm-o|Sony vt100 emulator 40 lines,
        OTbs,
        lines#40,
        is2=\E7\E[r\E8\EE\EE\EE\EM\EM\EM\E[?7h\E[?1l\E[?3l\E7\E[1;40
@@ -8684,7 +8684,7 @@ nwp512-o|nwp514-o|news-o|news40-o|vt100-bm-o|sony vt100 emulator 40 lines,
        use=news-old-unk,
 #
 # (nwp513: this had :DE=^H: and the alias vt100-bm --esr)
-nwp513|nwp518|nwe501|newscbm|news31|sony vt100 emulator 33 lines,
+nwp513|nwp518|nwe501|newscbm|news31|Sony vt100 emulator 33 lines,
        OTbs,
        lines#31,
        is2=\E7\E[r\E8\EE\EE\EE\EM\EM\EM\E[?7h\E[?1l\E[?3l\E7\E[1;31
@@ -8693,7 +8693,7 @@ nwp513|nwp518|nwe501|newscbm|news31|sony vt100 emulator 33 lines,
 #
 # (nwp513-a: this had :TY=ascii: and :DE=^H:, which I interpret as <OTbs>; --esr)
 # also the alias vt100-bm.
-nwp513-a|nwp518-a|nwe501-a|nwp251-a|newscbm-a|news31-a|newscbm33|news33|old sony vt100 emulator 33 lines,
+nwp513-a|nwp518-a|nwe501-a|nwp251-a|newscbm-a|news31-a|newscbm33|news33|old Sony vt100 emulator 33 lines,
        OTbs,
        lines#33,
        is2=\E7\E[r\E8\EE\EE\EE\EM\EM\EM\E[?7h\E[?1l\E[?3l\E7\E[1;33
@@ -8701,7 +8701,7 @@ nwp513-a|nwp518-a|nwe501-a|nwp251-a|newscbm-a|news31-a|newscbm33|news33|old sony
        use=news-old-unk,
 #
 # (nwp513-o: had :DE=^H:, I think that's <OTbs>; also the alias vt100-bm --esr)
-nwp513-o|nwp518-o|nwe501-o|nwp251-o|newscbm-o|news31-o|old sony vt100 emulator 33 lines,
+nwp513-o|nwp518-o|nwe501-o|nwp251-o|newscbm-o|news31-o|old Sony vt100 emulator 33 lines,
        OTbs,
        lines#31,
        is2=\E7\E[r\E8\EE\EE\EE\EM\EM\EM\E[?7h\E[?1l\E[?3l\E7\E[1;31
@@ -8709,7 +8709,7 @@ nwp513-o|nwp518-o|nwe501-o|nwp251-o|newscbm-o|news31-o|old sony vt100 emulator 3
        use=news-old-unk,
 #
 # (news28: this had :DE=^H:, I think that's <OTbs>, and :KB=nws1200: --esr)
-news28|sony vt100 emulator 28 lines,
+news28|Sony vt100 emulator 28 lines,
        OTbs,
        lines#28,
        is2=\E7\E[r\E8\EE\EE\EE\EM\EM\EM\E[?7h\E[?1l\E[?3l\E7\E[1;28
@@ -8717,7 +8717,7 @@ news28|sony vt100 emulator 28 lines,
        use=news-old-unk,
 #
 # (news29: this had :TY=ascii:KB=nws1200:\ --esr)
-news29|news28-a|sony vt100 emulator 29 lines,
+news29|news28-a|Sony vt100 emulator 29 lines,
        lines#29,
        is2=\E7\E[r\E8\EE\EE\EE\EM\EM\EM\E[?7h\E[?1l\E[?3l\E7\E[1;29
            r\E8,
@@ -9117,13 +9117,13 @@ djgpp|ANSI emulation for DJGPP alpha,
        sgr0=\E[m, smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m, vpa=\E[%i%p1%dd,
        use=vt220+pcedit, use=ecma+index,
 
-djgpp203|Entry for DJGPP 2.03,
+djgpp203|entry for DJGPP 2.03,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#25,
        bel=^G, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, ht=^I, ind=\n, kbs=^H, kcub1=^H,
        kcud1=\n, nel=\r\n,
 
-djgpp204|Entry for DJGPP 2.04,
+djgpp204|entry for DJGPP 2.04,
        OTbs, am, AX,
        colors#8, cols#80, it#8, lines#25, ncv#3, pairs#64,
        bel=^G, blink=\E[5m, bold=\E[1m, cbt=\E[Z, civis=\E[1v,
@@ -9355,7 +9355,7 @@ opennt-100-nti|ntconsole-100-nti|OpenNT-term100-nti compatible with color,
 # Comparison with the k* capabilities makes it obvious that the c* things are
 # shift keys.  I have renamed them to keys 32 and up accordingly.  Also,
 # :sr: was given as a boolean-- esr)
-altos2|alt2|altos-2|altos II,
+altos2|alt2|altos-2|Altos II,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, xmc#0,
        clear=\E[H\E[2J, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\E[1B, cuf1=\E[1C,
        cup=\E[%i%p1%d;%p2%dH, cuu1=\E[1A, dch1=\E[P, dl1=\E[M,
@@ -9379,9 +9379,9 @@ altos2|alt2|altos-2|altos II,
 #      :XU=^Aq\r:XD=^Ar\r:XR=^As\r:XL=^At\r:\
 #      :HL=^AP\r:SP=\E[i:\
 #      :IS=\E[@:DE=\E[P:IL=\E[L:NS=\E[S:PS=\E[T:
-altos3|altos5|alt3|alt5|altos-3|altos-5|altos III or V,
+altos3|altos5|alt3|alt5|altos-3|altos-5|Altos III or V,
        blink=\E[5p, ri=\EM, sgr0=\E[p, use=altos2,
-altos4|alt4|altos-4|altos IV,
+altos4|alt4|altos-4|Altos IV,
        use=wy50,
 # (altos7: had extension capabilities:
 #      :GG#0:GI=\EH8:GF=\EH7:\
@@ -9393,7 +9393,7 @@ altos4|alt4|altos-4|altos IV,
 # shift keys.  I have renamed them to keys 32 and up accordingly.  I have
 # also made this entry relative to adm12 in order to give it an <sgr>. The
 # <invis> imported by use=adm+sgr may work, let me know. -- esr)
-altos7|alt7|altos VII,
+altos7|alt7|Altos VII,
        am, mir,
        cols#80, lines#24, xmc#0,
        acsc=j5k3l2m1n8q:t4u9v=w0x6, blink=\EG2, bold=\EGt,
@@ -9411,7 +9411,7 @@ altos7|alt7|altos VII,
        kf8=^AG\r, kf9=^AH\r, khome=^^, kil1=^AJ\r, kind=^AO\r,
        knp=\EK, kpp=\EJ, mc4=\EJ, mc5=\Ed#, nel=\r\n, ri=\Ej,
        rmir=\Er, smir=\Eq, use=adm+sgr,
-altos7pc|alt7pc|altos PC VII,
+altos7pc|alt7pc|Altos PC VII,
        kend=\ET, use=altos7,
 
 #### Hewlett-Packard (hp)
@@ -9430,7 +9430,7 @@ altos7pc|alt7pc|altos PC VII,
 #
 
 # Generic HP terminal - this should (hopefully) work on any HP terminal.
-hpgeneric|hp|hewlett-packard generic terminal,
+hpgeneric|hp|Hewlett-Packard generic terminal,
        OTbs, OTpt, am, da, db, mir, xhp,
        cols#80, lines#24, lm#0, vt#6,
        bel=^G, clear=\EH\EJ, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=\EC,
@@ -9440,14 +9440,14 @@ hpgeneric|hp|hewlett-packard generic terminal,
        sgr0=\E&d@, smir=\EQ, smso=\E&dJ, smul=\E&dD, tbc=\E3,
        vpa=\E&a%p1%dY,
 
-hp110|hewlett-packard model 110 portable,
+hp110|Hewlett-Packard model 110 portable,
        lines#16, use=hpgeneric,
 
-hp+pfk+cr|hp function keys with CR,
+hp+pfk+cr|HP function keys with CR,
        kf1=\Ep\r, kf2=\Eq\r, kf3=\Er\r, kf4=\Es\r, kf5=\Et\r,
        kf6=\Eu\r, kf7=\Ev\r, kf8=\Ew\r,
 
-hp+pfk-cr|hp function keys w/o CR,
+hp+pfk-cr|HP function keys w/o CR,
        kf1=\Ep, kf2=\Eq, kf3=\Er, kf4=\Es, kf5=\Et, kf6=\Eu, kf7=\Ev,
        kf8=\Ew,
 
@@ -9455,12 +9455,12 @@ hp+pfk-cr|hp function keys w/o CR,
 # but not separate escape sequences. These definitions allow the
 # user to use those keys as arrow keys rather than as function
 # keys.
-hp+pfk+arrows|hp alternate arrow definitions,
+hp+pfk+arrows|HP alternate arrow definitions,
        kcub1=\Eu\r, kcud1=\Ew\r, kcuf1=\Ev\r, kcuu1=\Et\r, kf1@,
        kf2@, kf3@, kf4@, kf5@, kf6@, kf7@, kf8@, khome=\Ep\r, kind=\Er\r,
        kll=\Eq\r, kri=\Es\r,
 
-hp+arrows|hp arrow definitions,
+hp+arrows|HP arrow definitions,
        kcub1=\ED, kcud1=\EB, kcuf1=\EC, kcuu1=\EA, khome=\Eh,
        kind=\ES, kll=\EF, kri=\ET,
 
@@ -9493,15 +9493,15 @@ hp262x|HP 262x terminals,
 # Since there is no way to set/unset the strap with an escape
 # sequence, we don't use it in the default.
 # If you like, you can use 2621-ba (brain-damaged arrow keys).
-hp2621-ba|2621 w/new rom and strap A set,
+hp2621-ba|HP 2621 w/new rom and strap A set,
        rmkx@, smkx@, use=hp+arrows, use=hp2621,
 
 # hp2621 with function labels. Most of the time they are off,
 # but inside vi, the function key labels appear. You have to
 # hold down shift to get them to xmit.
-hp2621|hp2621a|hp2621A|2621|2621a|2621A|hp2621-wl|2621-wl|hp 2621 w/labels,
+hp2621|hp2621a|hp2621A|2621|2621a|2621A|hp2621-wl|2621-wl|HP 2621 w/labels,
        is2=\E&jA\r, rmkx=\E&jA, use=hp2621-fl,
-hp2621-fl|hp 2621,
+hp2621-fl|HP 2621,
        xhp@, xon,
        pb#19200,
        cbt=\Ei, cup=\E&a%p2%dc%p1%dY, dch1=\EP$<2>, ht=\011$<2>,
@@ -9510,32 +9510,32 @@ hp2621-fl|hp 2621,
        use=hp+pfk+cr, use=hpgeneric,
 
 # To use hp2621p printer, setenv TERM=2621p, PRINTER=2612p
-hp2621p|hp 2621 with printer,
+hp2621p|HP 2621 with printer,
        mc4=\E&p13C, mc5=\E&p11C, use=hp2621,
 
 hp2621p-a|hp2621p with fn as arrows,
        use=hp+pfk+arrows, use=hp2621p,
 
 # hp2621 with k45 keyboard
-hp2621-k45|hp2621k45|k45|hp 2621 with 45 keyboard,
+hp2621-k45|hp2621k45|k45|HP 2621 with 45 keyboard,
        kbs=^H, kcub1=\ED, kcud1=\EB, kcuf1=\EC, kcuu1=\EA,
        khome=\Eh, rmkx=\E&s0A, smkx=\E&s1A, use=hp2621,
 
 # 2621 using all 48 lines of memory, only 24 visible at any time.
-hp2621-48|48 line 2621,
+hp2621-48|HP 48 line 2621,
        lines#48,
        cup=\E&a%p2%dc%p1%dR, home=\EH, vpa=\E&a%p1%dR,
        use=hp2621,
 
 # 2621 with no labels ever. Also prevents vi delays on escape.
-hp2621-nl|hp 2621 with no labels,
+hp2621-nl|HP 2621 with no labels,
        kcub1@, kcud1@, kcuf1@, kcuu1@, khome@, rmkx@, smkx@,
        use=hp2621-fl,
 
 # Needed for UCB ARPAVAX console, since lsi-11 expands tabs
 # (wrong).
 #
-hp2621-nt|hp 2621 w/no tabs,
+hp2621-nt|HP 2621 w/no tabs,
        ht@, use=hp2621,
 
 # Hp 2624 B with 4 or 10 pages of memory.
@@ -9589,7 +9589,7 @@ hp2624|hp2624a|hp2624b|hp2624b-4p|Hewlett Packard 2624 B,
 #
 # The padding probably should be changed.
 #
-hp2626|hp2626a|hp2626p|hp 2626,
+hp2626|hp2626a|hp2626p|HP 2626,
        da, db,
        lm#0, pb#19200,
        ed=\ED\EJ$<500>\EC, indn=\E&r%p1%dD, ip=$<4>,
@@ -9607,7 +9607,7 @@ hp2626|hp2626a|hp2626p|hp 2626,
 # Note that this clears the tabs so it must be done by tset before
 # it sets the tabs.
 #
-hp2626-s|hp 2626 using only 23 lines,
+hp2626-s|HP 2626 using only 23 lines,
        eslok, hs,
        lines#23,
        fsl=\E&d@\E&w7f2p1I\E&w4f1I,
@@ -9615,36 +9615,36 @@ hp2626-s|hp 2626 using only 23 lines,
            \s\E&w2f2i0d23u23l0S\s\E&w7f2p1I\s\r,
        tsl=\E&w7f2p2I\E&w4f2I\r\EK\E&a%p1%dC, use=hp2626,
 # Force terminal back to 24 lines after being 23.
-hp2626-ns|hp 2626 using all 24 lines,
+hp2626-ns|HP 2626 using all 24 lines,
        is1=\E&q3t0{0H\s\E&w0f118n1I\s\E&w0f1n2I\s\E&w2f1i0d0u23l0S
            \s\E&w3f2I\s\E&w7f2p1I\s\r,
        use=hp2626,
 # Various entries useful for small windows on 2626.
-hp2626-12|hewlett-packard 2626 12 lines,
+hp2626-12|Hewlett-Packard 2626 12 lines,
        lines#12, use=hp2626,
-hp2626-12x40|hewlett-packard 2626 12 lines 40 columns,
+hp2626-12x40|Hewlett-Packard 2626 12 lines 40 columns,
        cols#40, lines#12, use=hp2626,
-hp2626-x40|hewlett-packard 2626 40 columns,
+hp2626-x40|Hewlett-Packard 2626 40 columns,
        cols#40, use=hp2626,
-hp2626-12-s|hewlett-packard 2626 11 lines plus status,
+hp2626-12-s|Hewlett-Packard 2626 11 lines plus status,
        lines#11, use=hp2626-s,
 
 #
 # hp2627 color tubes from University of Wisconsin
 #
-hp2627a-rev|hp 2627 with reverse video colors,
+hp2627a-rev|HP 2627 with reverse video colors,
        cr=\r, cud1=\n, ht=^I, ind=\n,
        is2=\E&v0m1a0b0c1x1y1z1i0a0b1c1x1y1z0i0S\E&j@\r\E3
            \r,
        kbs=^H, kcub1=^H, kcud1=\n, nel=\r\n, rmul=\E&v0S\E&d@,
        smul=\E&dD\E&v1S, use=hp2621-nl,
-hp2627a|hp 2627 color terminal with no labels,
+hp2627a|HP 2627 color terminal with no labels,
        cr=\r, cud1=\n, ht=^I, ind=\n,
        is2=\E&v0m1a1b0c1i0a1b1c2i1a0b0c0i0S\E&j@\r\E3\r,
        kbs=^H, kcub1=^H, kcud1=\n, nel=\r\n, rmso=\E&v0S,
        rmul=\E&v0S\E&d@, smso=\E&v2S, smul=\E&dD\E&v1S,
        use=hp2621-nl,
-hp2627c|hp 2627 color (cyan) terminal with no labels,
+hp2627c|HP 2627 color (cyan) terminal with no labels,
        cr=\r, cud1=\n, ht=^I, ind=\n,
        is2=\E&v0m1a0b0c2i1a1b0c1i0a1b1c0i0S\E&j@\r\E3\r,
        kbs=^H, kcub1=^H, kcud1=\n, nel=\r\n, use=hp2627a,
@@ -9652,10 +9652,10 @@ hp2627c|hp 2627 color (cyan) terminal with no labels,
 # hp2640a doesn't have the Y cursor addressing feature, and C is
 # memory relative instead of screen relative, as we need.
 #
-hp2640a|hp 2640a,
+hp2640a|HP 2640a,
        cup@, rmkx@, smkx@, use=hp2645,
 
-hp2640b|hp2644a|hp 264x series,
+hp2640b|hp2644a|HP 264x series,
        rmkx@, smkx@, use=hp2645,
 
 # (hp2641a: removed unknown :gu: -- esr)
@@ -9692,13 +9692,13 @@ hp2648|hp2648a|HP 2648a graphics terminal,
 # The HP 150 terminal is a fairly vanilla HP terminal, with the
 # clreol standout problem. It also has graphics capabilities and
 # a touch screen, which we don't describe here.
-hp150|hewlett packard Model 150,
+hp150|Hewlett Packard Model 150,
        OTbs, use=hp2622,
 
 # HP 2382a terminals, "the little ones." They don't have any
 # alternate character set support and sending out ^N/^O will
 # leave the screen blank.
-hp2382a|hp2382|hewlett packard 2382a,
+hp2382a|hp2382|Hewlett Packard 2382a,
        da, db,
        lh#1, lm#48,
        acsc@,
@@ -9723,7 +9723,7 @@ newhpkeyboard|generic entry for HP extended keyboard,
        kri=\ES, krmir=\ER, rmkx=\E&s0A, smkx=\E&s1A,
        use=hp+pfk-cr,
 
-newhp|generic entry for new hewlett packard terminals,
+newhp|generic entry for new Hewlett Packard terminals,
        am, bw, mir, xhp, xon,
        cols#80, lines#24, pb#4800,
        acsc=2[3@4>5I9(:'JSKWLQMAO#P$Q;R!S"T1U2V4W3X:Y+Z*dHjGkTlRmFn
@@ -9773,7 +9773,7 @@ hp+printer|"standard" printer info for HP ttys,
 # new 262x series of machines. It has dip-switched options.
 # The firmware has a bug in it such that if you give it a null
 # length label, the following character is eaten!
-hp2621b|hp 2621b with old style keyboard,
+hp2621b|HP 2621b with old style keyboard,
        lh#1, lm#48, lw#8, nlab#8,
        kcub1=\ED, kcud1=\EB, kcuf1=\EC, kcuu1=\EA, khome=\Eh,
        kind=\ET, kll=\EF, kri=\ES,
@@ -9781,15 +9781,15 @@ hp2621b|hp 2621b with old style keyboard,
            %;%p2%s\E%{111}%p1%+%c\r,
        smln=\E&jB, use=hp2621,
 
-hp2621b-p|hp 2621b with printer,
+hp2621b-p|HP 2621b with printer,
        use=hp+printer, use=hp2621b,
 
 # hp2621b - new 2621b with new extended keyboard
 # these are closer to the new 26xx series than the other 2621b
-hp2621b-kx|hp 2621b with extended keyboard,
+hp2621b-kx|HP 2621b with extended keyboard,
        use=newhpkeyboard, use=hp2621b,
 
-hp2621b-kx-p|hp 2621b with new keyboard & printer,
+hp2621b-kx-p|HP 2621b with new keyboard & printer,
        use=hp+printer, use=hp2621b-kx,
 
 # Some assumptions are made in the following entries.
@@ -9805,27 +9805,27 @@ hp2621b-kx-p|hp 2621b with new keyboard & printer,
 #
 # Hp 2622a & hp2623a display and graphics terminals
 #
-hp2622|hp2622a|hp 2622,
+hp2622|hp2622a|HP 2622,
        da, db,
        lm#0, pb#19200,
        is2=\E&dj@\r, use=hp+pfk-cr, use=hp+labels, use=scrhp,
 
 # The 2623 is a 2622 with extra graphics hardware.
-hp2623|hp2623a|hp 2623,
+hp2623|hp2623a|HP 2623,
        use=hp2622,
 
-hp2624b-p|hp2624b-4p-p|hewlett packard 2624 B with printer,
+hp2624b-p|hp2624b-4p-p|Hewlett Packard 2624 B with printer,
        use=hp+printer, use=hp2624,
 
 # The hewlett packard B can have an optional extra 6 pages of memory.
-hp2624-10p|hp2624a-10p|hp2624b-10p|hewlett packard 2624 B w/ 10 pages of memory,
+hp2624-10p|hp2624a-10p|hp2624b-10p|Hewlett Packard 2624 B w/ 10 pages of memory,
        lm#240, use=hp2624,
 
-hp2624b-10p-p|hewlett packard 2624 B w/ extra memory & printer,
+hp2624b-10p-p|Hewlett Packard 2624 B w/ extra memory & printer,
        lm#240, use=hp2624b-p,
 
 # Color manipulations for HP terminals
-hp+color|hp with colors,
+hp+color|HP with colors,
        ccc,
        colors#16, ncv#17, pairs#7,
        initp=\E&v%?%p2%{1000}%=%t1%e.%p2%d%;a%?%p3%{1000}%=%t1%e.
@@ -9837,7 +9837,7 @@ hp+color|hp with colors,
        op=\E&v0S, scp=\E&v%p1%dS,
 
 # <is2> sets the screen to be 80 columns wide
-hp2397a|hp2397|hewlett packard 2397A color terminal,
+hp2397a|hp2397|Hewlett Packard 2397A color terminal,
        is2=\E&w6f80X, use=memhp, use=hp+labels, use=hp+color,
 
 #  HP 700/44 Setup parameters:
@@ -9853,7 +9853,7 @@ hp2397a|hp2397|hewlett packard 2397A color terminal,
 # <is2>                sets pcterm; autowrap; 25 lines; pc char set; prog DEL key;
 # \E\\? does not turn off keycode mode
 # <smsc>       sets alternate start/stop; keycode on
-hpansi|hp700|hewlett packard 700/44 in HP-PCterm mode,
+hpansi|hp700|Hewlett Packard 700/44 in HP-PCterm mode,
        am, eo, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, lines#25,
        acsc=j\331k\277l\332m\300n\305q\304t\303u\264v\301w\302x
@@ -9882,7 +9882,7 @@ hp2392|239x series,
        rmir=\ER, rmul=\E&d@, smir=\EQ, smul=\E&dD, vpa=\E&a%p1%dY,
        use=hpsub,
 
-hpsub|hp terminals -- capability subset,
+hpsub|HP terminals -- capability subset,
        am, da, db, mir, xhp, xon,
        lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=\EH\EJ, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\EB, cuf1=\EC,
@@ -9902,13 +9902,13 @@ hpsub|hp terminals -- capability subset,
 #
 # (hpex: removed memory-lock capabilities ":ml=\El:mu=\Em:",
 # moved <rmir> here from hpsub -- esr)
-hpex|hp extended capabilities,
+hpex|HP extended capabilities,
        cr=\r, cud1=\n, cup=\E&a%p1%dy%p2%dC, ht=^I, ind=\n, kbs=^H,
        kcub1=^H, kcud1=\n, nel=\r\n, rmir=\ER, rmul=\E&d@, smir=\EQ,
        smul=\E&dD, vpa=\E&a%p1%dY, use=hpsub,
 
 # From: Ville Sulko <Ville.Sulko@bip.atk.tpo.fi>, 05 Aug 1996
-hp2|hpex2|hewlett-packard extended capabilities newer version,
+hp2|hpex2|Hewlett-Packard extended capabilities newer version,
        am, da, db, mir, xhp,
        cols#80, lh#2, lines#24, lm#0, lw#8, nlab#8, xmc#0,
        bel=^G, clear=\E&a0y0C\EJ, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\EB,
@@ -10107,7 +10107,7 @@ dku7003|Honeywell Bull DKU 7003 all features described,
        rmul=\E[m, sgr0=\E[m, smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m,
        use=dku7003-dumb,
 
-#### Lear-Siegler (adm)
+#### Lear-Siegler (LSI adm)
 #
 # These guys are long since out of the terminals business, but
 # in 1995 many current terminals still have an adm type as one of their
@@ -10121,13 +10121,13 @@ dku7003|Honeywell Bull DKU 7003 all features described,
 # hanging in the air. (Thanks to Eric Fischer, <eric@fudge.uchicago.edu>,
 # for clearing up this point.)
 
-adm1a|adm1|lsi adm1a,
+adm1a|adm1|LSI adm1a,
        am,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=\E;$<1>, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
        cup=\E=%p1%{32}%+%c%p2%{32}%+%c, cuu1=^K, home=^^,
        ind=\n,
-adm2|lsi adm2,
+adm2|LSI adm2,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=\E;, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -10135,7 +10135,7 @@ adm2|lsi adm2,
        dl1=\ER, ed=\EY, el=\ET, home=^^, ich1=\EQ, il1=\EE, ind=\n,
        kcub1=^H, kcud1=\n, kcuf1=^L, kcuu1=^K, khome=^^,
 # (adm3: removed obsolete ":ma=^K^P:" -- esr)
-adm3|lsi adm3,
+adm3|LSI adm3,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=^Z, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, ind=\n,
@@ -10151,7 +10151,7 @@ adm3|lsi adm3,
 # socket, you may be out of luck.
 #
 # (adm3a: some capabilities merged in from BRl entry -- esr)
-adm3a|lsi adm3a,
+adm3a|LSI adm3a,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        OTma=^K^P, OTnl=\n, bel=^G, clear=\032$<1/>, cr=\r, cub1=^H,
@@ -10161,7 +10161,7 @@ adm3a|lsi adm3a,
 adm3a+|adm3a plus,
        kbs=^H, use=adm3a,
 # (adm5: removed obsolete ":ma=^Hh^Jj^Kk^Ll^^H:" & duplicate ":do=^J:" -- esr)
-adm5|lsi adm5,
+adm5|LSI adm5,
        xmc#1,
        bel=^G, cr=\r, cud1=\n, ed=\EY, el=\ET, kbs=^H, khome=^^,
        rmso=\EG, smso=\EG, use=adm3a+,
@@ -10234,7 +10234,7 @@ adm11|LSI ADM-11,
 #         7 - 7
 #        20 - 6,8
 #
-adm12|lsi adm12,
+adm12|LSI adm12,
        OTbs, OTpt, am, mir,
        OTug#1, cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=^Z, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -10248,7 +10248,7 @@ adm12|lsi adm12,
        kf7=^A7\r, kf8=^A8\r, kf9=^A9\r, rmir=\Er, smir=\Eq, tbc=\E0,
        use=adm+sgr,
 # (adm20: removed obsolete ":kn#7:" -- esr)
-adm20|lear siegler adm20,
+adm20|Lear Siegler adm20,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        bel=^G, cbt=\EI, clear=^Z, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cuf1=^L,
@@ -10256,7 +10256,7 @@ adm20|lear siegler adm20,
        dl1=\ER, ed=\EY, el=\ET, home=^^, ht=^I, ich1=\EQ, il1=\EE,
        kf1=^A, kf2=^B, kf3=^W, kf4=^D, kf5=^E, kf6=^X, kf7=^Z, rmso=\E(,
        sgr0=\E(, smso=\E),
-adm21|lear siegler adm21,
+adm21|Lear Siegler adm21,
        xmc#1,
        bel=^G, cr=\r, cud1=\n, dch1=\EW, dl1=\ER$<30*>, ed=\EY,
        el=\ET, ich1=\EQ, il1=\EE$<30*>, ind=\n, invis@, kbs=^H,
@@ -10265,7 +10265,7 @@ adm21|lear siegler adm21,
 # (adm22: ":em=:" was an obvious typo for ":ei=:"; also,
 # removed obsolete ":kn#7:ma=j^Jk^P^K^Pl ^R^L^L :";
 # removed bogus-looking \200 from before <cup>. -- esr)
-adm22|lsi adm22,
+adm22|LSI adm22,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, cbt=\EI, clear=\E+, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -10420,7 +10420,7 @@ adm22|lsi adm22,
 # position 6, bank @c11, 25% from back end of the circuit board.  Should be
 # OFF.  If there is no such switch, you have an old adm31 and must use oadm31.
 # (adm31: removed obsolete ":ma=j^Jk^P^K^Pl ^R^L^L :" -- esr)
-adm31|lsi adm31 with sw6 set for underline mode,
+adm31|LSI adm31 with sw6 set for underline mode,
        OTbs, am, mir,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=\E*, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -10439,7 +10439,7 @@ adm36|LSI ADM36,
        if=/usr/share/tabset/vt100,
        is2=\E<\E>\E[6;?2;?7;?8h\E[4;20;?1;?3;?4;?5;?6;?18;?19l, use=vt100+4bsd,
 # (adm42: removed obsolete ":ma=^K^P:" -- esr)
-adm42|lsi adm42,
+adm42|LSI adm42,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, cbt=\EI, clear=\E;, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -10451,7 +10451,7 @@ adm42|lsi adm42,
 # The following termcap for the Lear Siegler ADM-42 leaves the
 # "system line" at the bottom of the screen blank (for those who
 # find it distracting otherwise)
-adm42-ns|lsi adm-42 with no system line,
+adm42-ns|LSI adm-42 with no system line,
        cbt=\EI\EF \011, clear=\E;\EF \011,
        cup=\E=%p1%{32}%+%c%p2%{32}%+%c$<6>\EF \011,
        dch1=\EW\EF \011, dl1=\ER\EF \011, ed=\EY\EF \011,
@@ -10462,7 +10462,7 @@ adm42-ns|lsi adm-42 with no system line,
 # purposes in that it will shift the position of every character on the page,
 # not just the cursor line!
 # From: Michael Driscoll <fenris@lightspeed.net> 10 July 1996
-adm1178|1178|lsi adm1178,
+adm1178|1178|LSI adm1178,
        am,
        cols#80, lines#24, xmc#1,
        bel=^G, bold=\E(, cbt=\EI, clear=\E+, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n,
@@ -10484,7 +10484,7 @@ adm1178|1178|lsi adm1178,
 #
 
 # Standout mode is dim reverse-video.
-pt100|pt200|wren|fenix|prime pt100/pt200,
+pt100|pt200|wren|fenix|Prime pt100/pt200,
        am, bw, mir, msgr,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        cbt=\E[Z, clear=\E?, cr=\r, cub=\E[%p1%dD, cub1=^H,
@@ -10499,7 +10499,7 @@ pt100|pt200|wren|fenix|prime pt100/pt200,
        smcup=\E[>1l\E[>2l\E[>16l\E[4l\E[>9l\E[20l\E[>3l\E[>7h\E[>12
              l\E[1Q,
        smir=\E[4h, smkx=\E[>13h, smso=\E[2;7m, smul=\E[4m,
-pt100w|pt200w|wrenw|fenixw|prime pt100/pt200 in 132-column mode,
+pt100w|pt200w|wrenw|fenixw|Prime pt100/pt200 in 132-column mode,
        cols#132,
        cup=\E[%i%p1%d;%p2%dH, use=pt100,
 pt250|Prime PT250,
@@ -10541,7 +10541,7 @@ pt250w|Prime PT250 in 132-column mode,
 # If you inherit a Qume without docs, try Ctrl-Shift-Setup to enter its
 # setup mode.  Shift-s should be a configuration save to NVRAM.
 
-qvt101|qvt108|qume qvt 101 and QVT 108,
+qvt101|qvt108|Qume qvt 101 and QVT 108,
        xmc#1, use=qvt101+,
 
 # This used to have <cvvis=\E.2> but no <cnorm> or <civis>.  The BSD termcap
@@ -10553,7 +10553,7 @@ qvt101|qvt108|qume qvt 101 and QVT 108,
 #
 # Added kdch1, kil1, kdl1 based on screenshot -TD:
 #      http://www.vintagecomputer.net/qume/qvt-108/qume_qvt-108_keyboard.jpg
-qvt101+|qvt101p|qume qvt 101 PLUS product,
+qvt101+|qvt101p|Qume qvt 101 PLUS product,
        am, bw, hs, ul,
        cols#80, lines#24, xmc#0,
        bel=^G, cbt=\EI, clear=^Z, cnorm=\E.4, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n,
@@ -10566,10 +10566,10 @@ qvt101+|qvt101p|qume qvt 101 PLUS product,
        kf4=^AC\r, kf5=^AD\r, kf6=^AE\r, kf7=^AF\r, kf8=^AG\r,
        kf9=^AH\r, khome=^^, kich1=\EQ, kil1=\EE, mc4=\EA, mc5=\E@,
        rmso=\E(, smso=\E0P\E), tbc=\E3, tsl=\Eg\Ef, use=adm+sgr,
-qvt102|qume qvt 102,
+qvt102|Qume qvt 102,
        cnorm=\E., use=qvt101,
 # (qvt103: added <rmam>/<smam> based on init string -- esr)
-qvt103|qume qvt 103,
+qvt103|Qume qvt 103,
        am, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, vt#3,
        bel=^G, blink=\E[5m$<2>, bold=\E[1m$<2>,
@@ -10587,10 +10587,10 @@ qvt103|qume qvt 103,
            %;m$<2>,
        sgr0=\E[m$<2>, smam=\E[?7h, smkx=\E[?1h\E=,
        smso=\E[7m$<2>, smul=\E[4m$<2>, tbc=\E[3g,
-qvt103-w|qume qvt103 132 cols,
+qvt103-w|Qume qvt103 132 cols,
        cols#132, lines#24,
        rs2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?8h, use=qvt103,
-qvt119+|qvt119p|qvt119|qume qvt 119 and 119PLUS terminals,
+qvt119+|qvt119p|qvt119|Qume qvt 119 and 119PLUS terminals,
        am, hs, mir, msgr,
        cols#80, lines#24, xmc#0,
        bel=^G, cbt=\EI, clear=\E*1, cnorm=\E.4, cr=\r, cub1=^H,
@@ -10610,12 +10610,12 @@ qvt119+-w|qvt119p-w|qvt119-w|QVT 119 and 119 PLUS in 132 column mode,
        is2=\EDF\EC\EG0\Er\E(\E%\EX\En4, use=qvt119+,
 qvt119+-25-w|qvt119p-25-w|qvt119-25-w|QVT 119 and 119 PLUS 132 by 25,
        lines#25, use=qvt119+,
-qvt203|qvt203+|qume qvt 203 Plus,
+qvt203|qvt203+|Qume qvt 203 Plus,
        dch1=\E[P$<7>, dl1=\E[M$<99>, il1=\E[L$<99>, ind=\n$<30>,
        ip=$<7>, kf0=\E[29~, kf1=\E[17~, kf2=\E[18~, kf3=\E[19~,
        kf4=\E[20~, kf5=\E[21~, kf6=\E[23~, kf7=\E[24~, kf8=\E[25~,
        kf9=\E[28~, rmir=\E[4l, smir=\E[4h, use=qvt103,
-qvt203-w|qvt203-w-am|qume qvt 203 PLUS in 132 cols (w/advanced video),
+qvt203-w|qvt203-w-am|Qume qvt 203 PLUS in 132 cols (w/advanced video),
        cols#132, lines#24,
        rs2=\E>\E[?3h\E[?4l\E[?5l\E[?8h, use=qvt203,
 #
@@ -10631,7 +10631,7 @@ qvt203-25-w|QVT 203 PLUS with 25 by 132 columns,
        cols#132, lines#25,
        rs2=\E[?3h\E[=40h, use=qvt203,
 
-#### Televideo (tvi)
+#### TeleVideo (tvi)
 #
 #      TeleVideo
 #      550 East Brokaw Road
@@ -10644,9 +10644,9 @@ qvt203-25-w|QVT 203 PLUS with 25 by 132 columns,
 # These require incredible amounts of padding.
 #
 # All of these terminals (912 to 970 and the tvipt) are discontinued.  Newer
-# Televideo terminals are ANSI and PC-ANSI compatible.
+# TeleVideo terminals are ANSI and PC-ANSI compatible.
 
-tvi803|televideo 803,
+tvi803|TeleVideo 803,
        clear=\E*$<10>, use=tvi950,
 
 # Vanilla tvi910 -- W. Gish <cswarren@violet> 10/29/86
@@ -10731,7 +10731,7 @@ tvi803|televideo 803,
 #     D  duplex
 # (tvi910: removed obsolete ":ma=^Kk^Ll^R^L:"; added <khome>, <cub1>, <cud1>,
 # <ind>, <hpa>, <vpa>, <am>, <msgr> from SCO entry -- esr)
-tvi910|televideo model 910,
+tvi910|TeleVideo model 910,
        OTbs, am, msgr,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, xmc#1,
        bel=^G, cbt=\EI, clear=^Z, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -10772,7 +10772,7 @@ tvi910|televideo model 910,
 # S2  9  DCD status (pin 8)  (U = disconnected, D = connected)
 # S2 10  DTR status (pin 20) (U = disconnected, D = connected)
 #
-tvi910+|televideo 910+,
+tvi910+|TeleVideo 910+,
        dch1=\EW, dl1=\ER$<33*>, home=^^, ich1=\EQ, il1=\EE$<33*>,
        kf0=^A@\r, kf1=^AA\r, kf2=^AB\r, kf3=^AC\r, kf4=^AD\r,
        kf5=^AE\r, kf6=^AF\r, kf7=^AG\r, kf8=^AH\r, kf9=^AI\r,
@@ -10780,7 +10780,7 @@ tvi910+|televideo 910+,
 
 # (tvi912: removed obsolete ":ma=^K^P^L :", added  <flash> and
 # <khome> from BRL entry -- esr)
-tvi912|tvi914|tvi920|old televideo 912/914/920,
+tvi912|tvi914|tvi920|old TeleVideo 912/914/920,
        OTbs, OTpt, am, msgr,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, xmc#1,
        bel=^G, clear=^Z, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -10795,7 +10795,7 @@ tvi912|tvi914|tvi920|old televideo 912/914/920,
 # We got some new tvi912c terminals that act really weird on the regular
 # termcap, so one of our gurus worked this up. Seems that cursor
 # addressing is broken.
-tvi912cc|tvi912 at cowell college,
+tvi912cc|tvi912 at Cowell College,
        cup@, use=tvi912c,
 
 # tvi{912,920}[bc] - TeleVideo TVI-912B/TVI-920B and TVI-912C/TVI-920C
@@ -11189,11 +11189,11 @@ tvi920b|tvi920c|TeleVideo TVI-920B or TVI-920C (half-intensity attribute),
 tvi920b-mc|tvi920c-mc|TeleVideo TVI-920B or TVI-920C (magic cookies),
        use=tvi920b+fn, use=tvi912b+mc, use=tvi912b-unk,
 
-# Televideo 921 and variants
+# TeleVideo 921 and variants
 # From: Tim Theisen <tim@cs.wisc.edu> 22 Sept 1995
 # (tvi921: removed :ko=bt: before translation, I see no backtab cap;
 # also added empty <acsc> to suppress tic warning -- esr)
-tvi921|televideo model 921 with sysline same as page & real vi function,
+tvi921|TeleVideo model 921 with sysline same as page & real vi function,
        OTbs, OTpt, am, hs, xenl, xhp,
        cols#80, lines#24, xmc#0,
        acsc=, clear=^Z, cnorm=\E.3, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=^V, cuf1=^L,
@@ -11208,7 +11208,7 @@ tvi921|televideo model 921 with sysline same as page & real vi function,
 # without the beeper
 # (tvi92B: removed :ko=bt: before translation, I see no backtab cap;
 # also added empty <acsc> to suppress tic warning -- esr)
-tvi92B|televideo model 921 with sysline same as page & real vi function & no beeper,
+tvi92B|TeleVideo model 921 with sysline same as page & real vi function & no beeper,
        am, hs, xenl, xhp,
        cols#80, lines#24, xmc#0,
        acsc=, clear=^Z, cnorm=\E.3, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=^V, cuf1=^L,
@@ -11229,7 +11229,7 @@ tvi92D|tvi92B with DTR instead of XON/XOFF & better padding,
 # (tvi924: This used to have <dsl=\Es0>, <fsl=\031>.  I put the new strings
 # in from a BSD termcap file because it looks like they do something the
 # old ones skip -- esr)
-tvi924|televideo tvi924,
+tvi924|TeleVideo tvi924,
        am, bw, hs, in, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, wsl#80, xmc#0,
        bel=^G, blink=\EG2, cbt=\EI, civis=\E.0, clear=\E*0,
@@ -11383,7 +11383,7 @@ tvi924|televideo tvi924,
 # --------------------------------------------
 #
 # (tvi925: BSD has <clear=\E*>.  I got <is2> and <ri> from there -- esr)
-tvi925|televideo 925,
+tvi925|TeleVideo 925,
        OTbs, am, bw, hs, ul,
        cols#80, lines#24, xmc#1,
        bel=^G, cbt=\EI, clear=^Z, cnorm=\E.4, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=^V,
@@ -11501,7 +11501,7 @@ tvi925-hi|TeleVideo Model 925 with half intensity standout mode,
 # Finally, note that BSD has cud1=^V. -- esr)
 #
 # TVI 950 has 11 function-keys -TD
-tvi950|televideo 950,
+tvi950|TeleVideo 950,
        OTbs, am, hs, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, xmc#1,
        acsc=jHkGlFmEnIqKtMuLvOwNxJ, bel=^G, cbt=\EI, clear=\E*,
@@ -11535,7 +11535,7 @@ tvi950|televideo 950,
 #      set duplex (send) edit keys (\El) when entering vi
 #      set local (no send) edit keys (\Ek) when exiting vi
 #
-tvi950-2p|televideo950 w/2 pages,
+tvi950-2p|TeleVideo 950 w/2 pages,
        is2=\EDF\EC\Ed\EG0\Eg\Er\EO\E'\E(\E%\Ew\EX\Ee\s\017\011\Ek
            \E016\E004\Ex0\0\0\Ex1\0\0\Ex2\0\0\011\Ex3\0\0\Ex4\r\0
            \E\\2\E-07\s\011,
@@ -11551,7 +11551,7 @@ tvi950-2p|televideo950 w/2 pages,
 #      when exiting ex, reset 96 line page (\E\\3)
 #                       place cursor at 0,24,1 (\E-07 )
 #
-tvi950-4p|televideo950 w/4 pages,
+tvi950-4p|TeleVideo 950 w/4 pages,
        is2=\EDF\EC\Ed\EG0\Eg\Er\EO\E'\E(\E%\Ew\EX\Ee\s\017\011\Ek
            \E016\E004\Ex0\0\0\Ex1\0\0\Ex2\0\0\011\Ex3\0\0\Ex4\r\0
            \E\\3\E-07\s\011,
@@ -11563,7 +11563,7 @@ tvi950-4p|televideo950 w/4 pages,
 #
 # set vb accordingly (\Ed ...delay... \Eb)
 #
-tvi950-rv|televideo950 rev video,
+tvi950-rv|TeleVideo 950 rev video,
        flash=\Ed$<200/>\Eb,
        is2=\EDF\EC\Eb\EG0\Eg\Er\EO\E'\E(\E%\Ew\EX\Ee\s\017\011\El
            \E016\E004\Ex0\0\0\Ex1\0\0\Ex2\0\0\011\Ex3\0\0\Ex4\r
@@ -11571,7 +11571,7 @@ tvi950-rv|televideo950 rev video,
        use=tvi950,
 
 # tvi950-rv-2p uses the appropriate entries from 950-2p and 950-rv
-tvi950-rv-2p|televideo950 rev video w/2 pages,
+tvi950-rv-2p|TeleVideo 950 rev video w/2 pages,
        flash=\Ed$<200/>\Eb,
        is2=\EDF\EC\Eb\EG0\Eg\Er\EO\E'\E(\E%\Ew\EX\Ee\s\017\011\Ek
            \E016\E004\Ex0\0\0\Ex1\0\0\Ex2\0\0\011\Ex3\0\0\Ex4\r\0
@@ -11580,7 +11580,7 @@ tvi950-rv-2p|televideo950 rev video w/2 pages,
        smkx=\El, use=tvi950,
 
 # tvi950-rv uses the appropriate entries from 950-4p and 950-rv
-tvi950-rv-4p|televideo950 rev video w/4 pages,
+tvi950-rv-4p|TeleVideo 950 rev video w/4 pages,
        flash=\Ed$<200/>\Eb,
        is2=\EDF\EC\Eb\EG0\Er\EO\E'\E(\E%\Ew\EX\Ee\s\017\011\Ek
            \E016\E004\Ex0\0\0\Ex1\0\0\Ex2\0\0\011\Ex3\0\0\Ex4\r\0
@@ -11597,7 +11597,7 @@ tvi950-rv-4p|televideo950 rev video w/4 pages,
 # ko implies -- esr)
 # If the BSD termcap file was right, <cup=\E=%p1%{32}%+%c%p2%{32}%+%c> would
 # also work.
-tvi955|televideo 955,
+tvi955|TeleVideo 955,
        OTbs, mc5i, msgr@,
        it#8, xmc@,
        acsc=0_`RjHkGlFmEnIoPqKsQtMuLvOwNxJ, blink=\EG2,
@@ -11610,11 +11610,11 @@ tvi955|televideo 955,
            \Ef\r,
        sgr0=\EG0\E[=5l, smacs=\E$, smam=\E[=7h, smxon=^O,
        use=tvi950,
-tvi955-w|955-w|televideo955 w/132 cols,
+tvi955-w|955-w|TeleVideo 955 w/132 cols,
        cols#132,
        is2=\E[=3h\EF1\Ed\EG0\E[=5l\E%\El, use=tvi955,
 # use half-intensity as normal mode, full intensity as <bold>
-tvi955-hb|955-hb|televideo955 half-bright,
+tvi955-hb|955-hb|TeleVideo 955 half-bright,
        bold=\E[=5l, dim@, is2=\E[=3l\EF1\Ed\EG0\E[=5h\E%\El,
        sgr0=\EG0\E[=5h, use=tvi955,
 # From: Humberto Appleton <beto@cs.utexas.edu>, 880521 UT Austin
@@ -11623,7 +11623,7 @@ tvi955-hb|955-hb|televideo955 half-bright,
 # According to BRL we could have <rmkx>=\E>, <smkx>=\E= but I'm not sure what
 # it does to the function keys.  I deduced <rmam>/<smam>.
 # also added empty <acsc> to suppress tic warning,  -- esr)
-tvi970|televideo 970,
+tvi970|TeleVideo 970,
        OTbs, OTpt, am, da, db, mir, msgr,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        acsc=, cbt=\E[Z, clear=\E[H\E[2J, csr=\E[%i%p1%d;%p2%dr,
@@ -11639,10 +11639,10 @@ tvi970|televideo 970,
        sgr0=\E[m, smacs=\E(B, smam=\E[?7l,
        smcup=\E[?20l\E[?7h\E[1Q, smir=\E[4h, smso=\E[7m,
        smul=\E[4m, vpa=\E[%i%p1%dd,
-tvi970-vb|televideo 970 with visual bell,
+tvi970-vb|TeleVideo 970 with visual bell,
        flash=\E[?5h\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\E[?5l,
        use=tvi970,
-tvi970-2p|televideo 970 with using 2 pages of memory,
+tvi970-2p|TeleVideo 970 with using 2 pages of memory,
        rmcup=\E[H\E[J\E[V, smcup=\E[U\E[?20l\E[?7h\E[1Q,
        use=tvi970,
 # Works with vi and rogue.  NOTE: Esc v sets autowrap on, Esc u sets 80 chars
@@ -11654,7 +11654,7 @@ tvi970-2p|televideo 970 with using 2 pages of memory,
 # From: Gene Rochlin <armsis@amber.berkeley.edu> 9/19/84.
 # The <ed>/<kf0>/<kf1>/<khome>/<mc4>, and <mc5> caps are from BRL, which says:
 # F1 and F2 should be programmed as ^A and ^B; required for UNIFY.
-tvipt|televideo personal terminal,
+tvipt|TeleVideo personal terminal,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        cbt=\EI, clear=^Z, cub1=^H, cuf1=^L,
@@ -11664,7 +11664,7 @@ tvipt|televideo personal terminal,
        kcuf1=^L, kcuu1=^K, kf0=^A, kf1=^B, khome=^^, mc4=^T, mc5=^R,
        rmso=\EF, rmul=\EF, smso=\EG1@A\EH, smul=\EG1B@\EH,
 # From: Nathan Peterson <nathan@sco.com>, 03 Sep 1996
-tvi9065|televideo 9065,
+tvi9065|TeleVideo 9065,
        am, bw, chts, hs, mc5i, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lh#1, lines#25, lm#0, lw#9, ma#4, nlab#8, vt#0,
        wnum#0, wsl#30,
@@ -11730,7 +11730,7 @@ tvi9065|televideo 9065,
 # Beau's entry is combined with the vi50 entry from University of Wisconsin.
 # Note especially the <il1> function.  <kf4>-<kf6> are really l4-l6 in
 # disguise; <kf7>-<kf9> are really l1-l3.
-vi50|visual 50,
+vi50|Visual 50,
        OTbs, OTpt, am, da, db, msgr,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        OTnl=\n, bel=^G, cbt=\Ez$<4/>, clear=\EH\EJ, cr=\r, cub1=^H,
@@ -11741,7 +11741,7 @@ vi50|visual 50,
        kf5=\EE, kf6=\E], kf7=\EL, kf8=\Ev, kf9=\EM, khome=\EH,
        nel=\r\n, ri=\EI, rmso=\ET, rmul=\EW, smso=\EU, smul=\ES,
 # this one was BSD & SCO's vi50
-vi50adm|visual 50 in adm3a mode,
+vi50adm|Visual 50 in adm3a mode,
        am, msgr,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=^Z, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -11770,7 +11770,7 @@ vi55|Visual 55,
 # (This cap is commented out because <smir>/<rmir> is more efficient -- esr)
 # Supposedly "4*" delays should be used for <il1>, <ed>, <clear>, <dch1>,
 # and <dl1> strings, but we seem to get along fine without them.
-vi200|visual 200,
+vi200|Visual 200,
        OTbs, OTpt, am, mir, msgr,
        OTkn#10, cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        acsc=+h.kffggjmkllsmenbq`tnuovcwdxa}r, bel=^G, cbt=\Ez,
@@ -11789,12 +11789,12 @@ vi200|visual 200,
 # <smkx> and <rmkx> so that the keypad keys can be used as function keys.
 # If your version of vi doesn't support function keys you may want
 # to use vi200-f.
-vi200-f|visual 200 no function keys,
+vi200-f|Visual 200 no function keys,
        is2=\E3\Eb\Ej\E\\\El\EG\Ed\Ek, kf0=\E?p, kf1=\E?q,
        kf2=\E?r, kf3=\E?s, kf4=\E?t, kf5=\E?u, kf6=\E?v, kf7=\E?w,
        kf8=\E?x, kf9=\E?y, rmkx=\E>, rmso@, smkx=\E=, smso@,
        use=vi200,
-vi200-rv|visual 200 reverse video,
+vi200-rv|Visual 200 reverse video,
        cnorm@, cvvis@, ri@, rmso=\E3, smso=\E4, use=vi200,
 
 # the function keys are programmable but we don't reprogram them to their
@@ -11802,7 +11802,7 @@ vi200-rv|visual 200 reverse video,
 # an initialization file should be made for the 300 and they could be stuck
 # in it.
 # (vi300: added <rmam>/<smam> based on init string -- esr)
-vi300|visual 300 ansi x3.64,
+vi300|Visual 300 ansi x3.64,
        am, bw, mir, xenl,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, cbt=\E[Z, clear=\E[H\E[2J, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\E[B,
@@ -11818,7 +11818,7 @@ vi300|visual 300 ansi x3.64,
        smso=\E[1m, smul=\E[4m,
 # some of the vi300s have older firmware that has the command
 # sequence for setting editing extent reversed.
-vi300-old|visual 300 with old firmware (set edit extent reversed),
+vi300-old|Visual 300 with old firmware (set edit extent reversed),
        is2=\E[7s\E[2;3;4;20;?5;?6l\E[12;?7h\E[2Q\E[0;1(D\E[8s, use=vi300,
 
 # Visual 500 prototype entry from University of Wisconsin.
@@ -11830,7 +11830,7 @@ vi300-old|visual 300 with old firmware (set edit extent reversed),
 # of this slow terminal.  :xp: is 10 time the padding factor.
 # (vi500: removed unknown :xp#4: termcap;
 # also added empty <acsc> to suppress tic warning -- esr)
-vi500|visual 500,
+vi500|Visual 500,
        am, mir, msgr,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#33,
        acsc=, cbt=\Ez$<4/>, clear=\Ev$<6*/>, cr=\r,
@@ -11844,14 +11844,14 @@ vi500|visual 500,
        khome=\EH, nel=\r\n, rmacs=^O, rmir=\Ej, rmso=\E^G,
        rmul=\E^C, smacs=^N, smir=\Ei, smso=\E^H, smul=\E^D,
 
-# The visual 550 is a visual 300 with tektronix graphics,
+# The visual 550 is a visual 300 with Tektronix graphics,
 # and with 33 lines. clear screen is modified here to
 # also clear the graphics.
-vi550|visual 550 ansi x3.64,
+vi550|Visual 550 ansi x3.64,
        lines#33,
        clear=\030\E[H\E[2J, use=vi300,
 
-vi603|visual603|visual 603,
+vi603|visual603|Visual 603,
        hs, mir,
        bel=^G, blink=\E[5m, bold=\E[1m, clear=\E[H\E[J,
        csr=\E[%i%p1%d;%p2%dr, cuf1=\E[C,
@@ -11922,7 +11922,7 @@ wy30|wyse30|Wyse 30,
 #      (with magic cookie).
 #
 # (wy30-mc: added <smcup> to suppress tic warning --esr)
-wy30-mc|wyse30-mc|wyse 30 with magic cookies,
+wy30-mc|wyse30-mc|Wyse 30 with magic cookies,
        msgr@,
        ma@, xmc#1,
        blink=\EG2, dim=\EGp, prot=\EG0\E), rmacs=\EG0\EH\003,
@@ -11936,7 +11936,7 @@ wy30-mc|wyse30-mc|wyse 30 with magic cookies,
 #      older versions of terminfo.  If you see this effect then
 #      unset xon and delete the / from the delay.
 #      i.e. change $<100/> to $<100>
-wy30-vb|wyse30-vb|wyse 30 visible bell,
+wy30-vb|wyse30-vb|Wyse 30 visible bell,
        bel@, use=wy30,
 #
 #         The Wyse 50 can support one attribute (e.g. Dim, Inverse,
@@ -11984,7 +11984,7 @@ wy50|wyse50|Wyse 50,
 #      unset <xon> and delete the / from the delay.
 #      i.e. change $<100/> to $<100>
 # (wy50-mc: added <smcup> to suppress tic warning --esr)
-wy50-mc|wyse50-mc|wyse 50 with magic cookies,
+wy50-mc|wyse50-mc|Wyse 50 with magic cookies,
        msgr@,
        ma@, xmc#1,
        blink=\EG2, dim=\EGp, prot=\EG0\E), rev=\EG4,
@@ -11994,13 +11994,13 @@ wy50-mc|wyse50-mc|wyse 50 with magic cookies,
            %t\E)%e\E(%;%?%p9%t\EH\002%e\EH\003%;,
        sgr0=\EG0\E(\EH\003, smacs=\EG0\EH\002, smcup=,
        smso=\EGt, use=wy50, use=adm+sgr,
-wy50-vb|wyse50-vb|wyse 50 visible bell,
+wy50-vb|wyse50-vb|Wyse 50 visible bell,
        bel@, use=wy50,
-wy50-w|wyse50-w|wyse 50 132-column,
+wy50-w|wyse50-w|Wyse 50 132-column,
        cols#132, lw#7, nlab#16, wsl#97,
        cup=\Ea%i%p1%dR%p2%dC, dch1=\EW$<2>, is1=\E`;\E`9$<30>,
        use=wy50,
-wy50-wvb|wyse50-wvb|wyse 50 132-column visible bell,
+wy50-wvb|wyse50-wvb|Wyse 50 132-column visible bell,
        bel@, use=wy50-w,
 
 #
@@ -12058,19 +12058,19 @@ wy350|wyse350|Wyse 350,
            \002%e\EH\003%;,
        sgr0=\EG0\E(\EH\003%{0}%PA%{0}%PC, smacs=\EG0\EH\002,
        smir=\Eq, smln=\EA10, tbc=\E0, tsl=\EF, use=adm+sgr,
-wy350-vb|wyse350-vb|wyse 350 visible bell,
+wy350-vb|wyse350-vb|Wyse 350 visible bell,
        bel@, use=wy350,
-wy350-w|wyse350-w|wyse 350 132-column,
+wy350-w|wyse350-w|Wyse 350 132-column,
        cols#132, lw#7, nlab#16, wsl#97,
        cup=\Ea%i%p1%dR%p2%dC, dch1=\EW$<2>, is1=\E`;\E`9$<30>,
        use=wy350,
-wy350-wvb|wyse350-wvb|wyse 350 132-column visible bell,
+wy350-wvb|wyse350-wvb|Wyse 350 132-column visible bell,
        bel@, use=wy350-w,
 #
 #      This terminfo description is untested.
 #      The wyse100 emulates an adm31, so the adm31 entry should work.
 #
-wy100|wyse 100,
+wy100|Wyse 100,
        hs, mir,
        cols#80, lines#24, xmc#1,
        bel=^G, clear=\E;, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -12120,16 +12120,16 @@ wy120|wyse120|wy150|wyse150|Wyse 120/150,
        smcup=\Ew0, smir=\Eq, smln=\EA10, smso=\EGt, smxon=\Ec21,
        tbc=\E0, tsl=\EF, use=adm+sgr,
 #
-wy120-w|wyse120-w|wy150-w|wyse150-w|wyse 120/150 132-column,
+wy120-w|wyse120-w|wy150-w|wyse150-w|Wyse 120/150 132-column,
        cols#132, lw#7, nlab#16, wsl#97,
        cup=\Ea%i%p1%dR%p2%dC, dch1=\EW$<12>, ip=$<4>,
        rs2=\E`;$<70>, use=wy120,
 #
-wy120-25|wyse120-25|wy150-25|wyse150-25|wyse 120/150 80-column 25-lines,
+wy120-25|wyse120-25|wy150-25|wyse150-25|Wyse 120/150 80-column 25-lines,
        lh@, lines#25, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<100>, use=wy120,
 #
-wy120-25-w|wyse120-25-w|wy150-25-w|wyse150-25-w|wyse 120/150 132-column 25-lines,
+wy120-25-w|wyse120-25-w|wy150-25-w|wyse150-25-w|Wyse 120/150 132-column 25-lines,
        lh@, lines#25, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<100>, use=wy120-w,
 #
@@ -12206,34 +12206,34 @@ wy60|wyse60|Wyse 60,
        kF2=^Aa\r, kF3=^Ab\r, kF4=^Ac\r, kF5=^Ad\r, kF6=^Ae\r,
        kF7=^Af\r, kF8=^Ag\r, kF9=^Ah\r, use=adm+sgr,
 #
-wy60-w|wyse60-w|wyse 60 132-column,
+wy60-w|wyse60-w|Wyse 60 132-column,
        cols#132, lw#7, nlab#16, wsl#97,
        cup=\Ea%i%p1%dR%p2%dC, dch1=\EW$<16>, ip=$<5>,
        rs2=\EeF$<150>\E`;$<150>, use=wy60,
 #
-wy60-25|wyse60-25|wyse 60 80-column 25-lines,
+wy60-25|wyse60-25|Wyse 60 80-column 25-lines,
        lh@, lines#25, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<200>, use=wy60,
-wy60-25-w|wyse60-25-w|wyse 60 132-column 25-lines,
+wy60-25-w|wyse60-25-w|Wyse 60 132-column 25-lines,
        lh@, lines#25, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<200>, use=wy60-w,
 #
-wy60-42|wyse60-42|wyse 60 80-column 42-lines,
+wy60-42|wyse60-42|Wyse 60 80-column 42-lines,
        lines#42,
        clear=\E+$<260>, cup=\E=%p1%{32}%+%c%p2%{32}%+%c$<2>,
        dch1=\EW$<16>, dl1=\ER$<11>, ed=\Ey$<260>, il1=\EE$<11>,
        ind=\n$<9>, ip=$<5>, is1=\EcB2\EcC3, nel=\r\n$<6>,
        ri=\Ej$<10>, rs3=\Ee*$<150>, use=wy60,
-wy60-42-w|wyse60-42-w|wyse 60 132-column 42-lines,
+wy60-42-w|wyse60-42-w|Wyse 60 132-column 42-lines,
        cols#132, lw#7, nlab#16, wsl#97,
        clear=\E+$<260>, cup=\Ea%i%p1%dR%p2%dC$<2>,
        dch1=\EW$<19>, ed=\Ey$<260>, home=\036$<2>, ip=$<6>,
        nel=\r\n$<11>, rs2=\EeF$<150>\E`;$<150>, use=wy60-42,
 #
-wy60-43|wyse60-43|wyse 60 80-column 43-lines,
+wy60-43|wyse60-43|Wyse 60 80-column 43-lines,
        lh@, lines#43, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\Ee+$<150>, use=wy60-42,
-wy60-43-w|wyse60-43-w|wyse 60 132-column 43-lines,
+wy60-43-w|wyse60-43-w|Wyse 60 132-column 43-lines,
        lh@, lines#43, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\Ee+$<150>, use=wy60-42-w,
 #
@@ -12265,17 +12265,17 @@ wy99gt|wyse99gt|Wyse 99gt,
        ri=\Ej$<3>, rmcup=\Ew0, rs2=\E`:$<150>, smcup=\Ew1,
        u0=\E~>\E8, u1=\E[42h, use=wy60,
 #
-wy99gt-w|wyse99gt-w|wyse 99gt 132-column,
+wy99gt-w|wyse99gt-w|Wyse 99gt 132-column,
        cols#132, lw#7, nlab#16, wsl#97,
        clear=\E+$<160>, cup=\Ea%i%p1%dR%p2%dC$<2>,
        dch1=\EW$<9>, ed=\Ey$<160>, ip=$<4>, rs2=\E`;$<150>,
        use=wy99gt,
 #
-wy99gt-25|wyse99gt-25|wyse 99gt 80-column 25-lines,
+wy99gt-25|wyse99gt-25|Wyse 99gt 80-column 25-lines,
        lh@, lines#25, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs2=\E`:$<150>, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<200>, use=wy99gt,
 #
-wy99gt-25-w|wyse99gt-25-w|wyse 99gt 132-column 25-lines,
+wy99gt-25-w|wyse99gt-25-w|Wyse 99gt 132-column 25-lines,
        lh@, lines#25, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs2=\E`;$<150>, use=wy99gt-w,
 #
@@ -12439,32 +12439,32 @@ wy160|wyse160|Wyse 160,
        smcup=\Ew1, smir=\Eq, smln=\EA10, smso=\EGt, smxon=\Ec21,
        tbc=\E0, tsl=\EF, use=adm+sgr,
 #
-wy160-w|wyse160-w|wyse 160 132-column,
+wy160-w|wyse160-w|Wyse 160 132-column,
        cols#132, lw#7, nlab#16, wsl#90,
        cup=\Ea%i%p1%dR%p2%dC, dch1=\EW$<9>,
        rs2=\EeF$<150>\E`;$<150>, use=wy160,
 #
-wy160-25|wyse160-25|wyse 160 80-column 25-lines,
+wy160-25|wyse160-25|Wyse 160 80-column 25-lines,
        lh@, lines#25, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<200>, use=wy160,
-wy160-25-w|wyse160-25-w|wyse 160 132-column 25-lines,
+wy160-25-w|wyse160-25-w|Wyse 160 132-column 25-lines,
        lh@, lines#25, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<200>, use=wy160-w,
 #
-wy160-42|wyse160-42|wyse 160 80-column 42-lines,
+wy160-42|wyse160-42|Wyse 160 80-column 42-lines,
        lines#42,
        clear=\E+$<50>, dl1=\ER$<2>, ed=\Ey$<50>, il1=\EE$<2>,
        ind=\n$<2>, is1=\EcB2\EcC3, nel=\r\n$<2>, ri=\Ej$<2>,
        rs3=\Ee*$<150>, use=wy160,
-wy160-42-w|wyse160-42-w|wyse 160 132-column 42-lines,
+wy160-42-w|wyse160-42-w|Wyse 160 132-column 42-lines,
        cols#132, lw#7, nlab#16, wsl#90,
        cup=\Ea%i%p1%dR%p2%dC, dch1=\EW$<8>, ip=$<3>,
        rs2=\EeF$<150>\E`;$<150>, use=wy160-42,
 #
-wy160-43|wyse160-43|wyse 160 80-column 43-lines,
+wy160-43|wyse160-43|Wyse 160 80-column 43-lines,
        lh@, lines#43, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\Ee+$<150>, use=wy160-42,
-wy160-43-w|wyse160-43-w|wyse 160 132-column 43-lines,
+wy160-43-w|wyse160-43-w|Wyse 160 132-column 43-lines,
        lh@, lines#43, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\Ee+$<150>, use=wy160-42-w,
 #
@@ -12484,7 +12484,7 @@ wy160-w-vb|wy160-wvb|wyse160-wvb|Wyse 160 132-column visible bell,
 #      cookies.  The wy75-mc terminal description uses magic cookies
 #      to correctly handle multiple attributes on a screen.
 #
-wy75|wyse75|wyse 75,
+wy75|wyse75|Wyse 75,
        am, hs, mc5i, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, lines#24, ma#1, pb#1201, wsl#78,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -12524,7 +12524,7 @@ wy75|wyse75|wyse 75,
 #      This terminal description uses the non-hidden attribute mode
 #      (with magic cookie).
 #
-wy75-mc|wyse75-mc|wyse 75 with magic cookies,
+wy75-mc|wyse75-mc|Wyse 75 with magic cookies,
        msgr@,
        ma@, xmc#1,
        blink=\E[2p, dim=\E[1p, invis=\E[4p, is3=\E[m\E[p,
@@ -12534,13 +12534,13 @@ wy75-mc|wyse75-mc|wyse 75 with magic cookies,
            %t\016%e\017%;,
        sgr0=\E[0p\017, smacs=\E[0p\016, smso=\E[17p, smul=\E[8p,
        use=wy75,
-wy75-vb|wyse75-vb|wyse 75 with visible bell,
+wy75-vb|wyse75-vb|Wyse 75 with visible bell,
        pb@,
        bel@, use=wy75,
-wy75-w|wyse75-w|wyse 75 in 132 column mode,
+wy75-w|wyse75-w|Wyse 75 in 132 column mode,
        cols#132, wsl#130,
        rs2=\E[35h\E[?3h$<80>, use=wy75,
-wy75-wvb|wyse75-wvb|wyse 75 with visible bell 132 columns,
+wy75-wvb|wyse75-wvb|Wyse 75 with visible bell 132 columns,
        pb@,
        bel@, use=wy75-w,
 #
@@ -12556,7 +12556,7 @@ wy75-wvb|wyse75-wvb|wyse 75 with visible bell 132 columns,
 #      <dch> and <ich> work best when XON/XOFF is set.  <ich> and
 #      <dch> leave trash on the screen when used without XON/XOFF.
 #
-wy85|wyse85|wyse 85,
+wy85|wyse85|Wyse 85,
        am, hs, mc5i, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, wsl#80,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -12591,16 +12591,16 @@ wy85|wyse85|wyse 85,
        use=vt220+cvis, use=vt220+keypad,
 #
 #      Wyse 85 with visual bell.
-wy85-vb|wyse85-vb|wyse 85 with visible bell,
+wy85-vb|wyse85-vb|Wyse 85 with visible bell,
        bel@, flash=\E[30h\E\,$<300/>\E[30l, use=wy85,
 #
 #      Wyse 85 in 132-column mode.
-wy85-w|wyse85-w|wyse 85 in 132-column mode,
+wy85-w|wyse85-w|Wyse 85 in 132-column mode,
        cols#132, wsl#132,
        rs2=\E[35h$<70/>\E[?3h, use=wy85,
 #
 #      Wyse 85 in 132-column mode with visual bell.
-wy85-wvb|wyse85-wvb|wyse 85 with visible bell 132-columns,
+wy85-wvb|wyse85-wvb|Wyse 85 with visible bell 132-columns,
        bel@, use=wy85-w,
 
 # From: Kevin Turner <kevint@aracnet.com>, 12 Jul 1998
@@ -12613,7 +12613,7 @@ wy85-wvb|wyse85-wvb|wyse 85 with visible bell 132-columns,
 # Technical" isn't responding.  So there's the question of whether the wy85
 # terminfo should reflect the manufacturer's intended behaviour of the terminal
 # or the actual."
-wy85-8bit|wyse85-8bit|wyse 85 in 8-bit mode,
+wy85-8bit|wyse85-8bit|Wyse 85 in 8-bit mode,
        am, hs, mc5i, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, wsl#80,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -12660,7 +12660,7 @@ wy85-8bit|wyse85-8bit|wyse 85 in 8-bit mode,
 #      The Compose Character key can be used as a meta key if changed
 #      by set-up.
 #
-wy185|wyse185|wyse 185,
+wy185|wyse185|Wyse 185,
        am, hs, km, mc5i, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, wsl#80,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -12698,23 +12698,23 @@ wy185|wyse185|wyse 185,
        use=vt220+vtedit, use=vt220+keypad,
 #
 #      Wyse 185 with 24 data lines and top status (terminal status)
-wy185-24|wyse185-24|wyse 185 with 24 data lines,
+wy185-24|wyse185-24|Wyse 185 with 24 data lines,
        hs@,
        dsl@, fsl@, rs3=\E[?5l\E[47h\E[40l\E[1;24r, tsl@,
        use=wy185,
 #
 #      Wyse 185 with visual bell.
-wy185-vb|wyse185-vb|wyse 185+flash,
+wy185-vb|wyse185-vb|Wyse 185+flash,
        bel@, use=wy185,
 #
 #      Wyse 185 in 132-column mode.
-wy185-w|wyse185-w|wyse 185 in 132-column mode,
+wy185-w|wyse185-w|Wyse 185 in 132-column mode,
        cols#132, wsl#132,
        dch=\E[%p1%dP$<7>, dch1=\E[P$<7>, ich=\E[%p1%d@$<7>,
        ip=$<7>, rs2=\E[35h\E[?3h, use=wy185,
 #
 #      Wyse 185 in 132-column mode with visual bell.
-wy185-wvb|wyse185-wvb|wyse 185+flash+132 cols,
+wy185-wvb|wyse185-wvb|Wyse 185+flash+132 cols,
        bel@, use=wy185-w,
 
 # wy325 terminfo entries
@@ -12758,67 +12758,67 @@ wy325|wyse325|Wyse epc,
 #
 # lines 24  columns 80  vb
 #
-wy325-vb|wyse325-vb|wyse-325 with visual bell,
+wy325-vb|wyse325-vb|Wyse-325 with visual bell,
        bel@, use=wy325,
 
 #
 # lines 24  columns 132
 #
-wy325-w|wyse325-w|wy325w-24|wyse-325 in wide mode,
+wy325-w|wyse325-w|wy325w-24|Wyse-325 in wide mode,
        cols#132, lw#7, nlab#16, wsl#97,
        cup=\Ea%i%p1%dR%p2%dC, dch1=\EW$<12>, ip=$<4>,
        rs2=\E`;$<70>, use=wy325,
 #
 # lines 25  columns 80
 #
-wy325-25|wyse325-25|wy325-80|wyse-325|wyse-325 25 lines,
+wy325-25|wyse325-25|wy325-80|wyse-325|Wyse-325 25 lines,
        lh@, lines#25, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<100>, use=wy325,
 #
 # lines 25  columns 132
 #
-wy325-25w|wyse325-25w|wy325 132 columns,
+wy325-25w|wyse325-25w|Wyse-325 132 columns,
        lh@, lines#25, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<100>, use=wy325-w,
 #
 # lines 25  columns 132  vb
 #
-wy325-w-vb|wy325-wvb|wyse325-wvb|wyse-325 wide mode reverse video,
+wy325-w-vb|wy325-wvb|wyse325-wvb|Wyse-325 wide mode reverse video,
        bel@, use=wy325-w,
 
 #
 # lines 42  columns 80
 #
-wy325-42|wyse325-42|wyse-325 42 lines,
+wy325-42|wyse325-42|Wyse-325 42 lines,
        lh@, lines#42, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<100>, use=wy325,
 #
 # lines 42  columns 132
 #
-wy325-42w|wyse325-42w|wyse-325 42 lines wide mode,
+wy325-42w|wyse325-42w|Wyse-325 42 lines wide mode,
        lh@, lines#42, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<100>, use=wy325-w,
 #
 # lines 42  columns 132  vb
 #
-wy325-42w-vb|wy325-42wvb|wyse-325 42 lines wide mode visual bell,
+wy325-42w-vb|wy325-42wvb|Wyse-325 42 lines wide mode visual bell,
        bel@, use=wy325-w,
 #
 # lines 43  columns 80
 #
-wy325-43|wyse325-43|wyse-325 43 lines,
+wy325-43|wyse325-43|Wyse-325 43 lines,
        lh@, lines#43, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, use=wy325,
 #
 # lines 43  columns 132
 #
-wy325-43w|wyse325-43w|wyse-325 43 lines wide mode,
+wy325-43w|wyse325-43w|Wyse-325 43 lines wide mode,
        lh@, lines#43, lw@, nlab@,
        pln@, rs3=\EwG\Ee)$<100>, use=wy325-w,
 #
 # lines 43  columns 132  vb
 #
-wy325-43w-vb|wy325-43wvb|wyse-325 43 lines wide mode visual bell,
+wy325-43w-vb|wy325-43wvb|Wyse-325 43 lines wide mode visual bell,
        bel@, use=wy325-w,
 
 #      Wyse 370 -- 24 line screen with status line.
@@ -12839,7 +12839,7 @@ wy325-43w-vb|wy325-43wvb|wyse-325 43 lines wide mode visual bell,
 #      <u5> -> exit  Tek 4207 mode (goto native ANSI mode)
 #
 # Bug: The <op> capability resets attributes.
-wy370-nk|wyse 370 without function keys,
+wy370-nk|Wyse 370 without function keys,
        am, ccc, hs, mc5i, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        colors#64, cols#80, it#8, lines#24, ncv#48, pairs#64, wsl#80,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -13002,7 +13002,7 @@ wy370-tek|Wyse 370 Tektronix 4010/4014 emulator,
 #         keypad in Dec application mode which doesn't seem to work
 #         with SCO applications.
 #
-wy520|wyse520|wyse 520,
+wy520|wyse520|Wyse 520,
        am, hs, km, mc5i, mir, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, wsl#80,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -13038,23 +13038,23 @@ wy520|wyse520|wyse 520,
        vpa=\E[%i%p1%dd, use=vt220+vtedit, use=vt220+keypad,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 with 24 data lines and status (terminal status)
-wy520-24|wyse520-24|wyse 520 with 24 data lines,
+wy520-24|wyse520-24|Wyse 520 with 24 data lines,
        hs@,
        dsl@, fsl@, rs3=\E[?5l\E[47h\E[40l\E[1;24r, tsl@,
        use=wy520,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 with visual bell.
-wy520-vb|wyse520-vb|wyse 520 with visible bell,
+wy520-vb|wyse520-vb|Wyse 520 with visible bell,
        flash=\E[30h\E\,$<100/>\E[30l, use=wy520,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 132-column mode.
-wy520-w|wyse520-w|wyse 520 in 132-column mode,
+wy520-w|wyse520-w|Wyse 520 in 132-column mode,
        cols#132, wsl#132,
        dch=\E[%p1%dP$<7>, dch1=\E[P$<7>, ich=\E[%p1%d@$<7>,
        ip=$<7>, rs2=\E[35h\E[?3h, use=wy520,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 132-column mode with visual bell.
-wy520-wvb|wyse520-wvb|wyse 520 with visible bell 132-columns,
+wy520-wvb|wyse520-wvb|Wyse 520 with visible bell 132-columns,
        flash=\E[30h\E\,$<100/>\E[30l, use=wy520-w,
 #
 #
@@ -13067,55 +13067,55 @@ wy520-wvb|wyse520-wvb|wyse 520 with visible bell 132-columns,
 #       - Delete : delete a character (have to change interrupt character
 #                  to CTRL-C: stty intr '^c') for it to work since the
 #                  Delete key sends 7FH.
-wy520-epc|wyse520-epc|wyse 520 with EPC keyboard,
+wy520-epc|wyse520-epc|Wyse 520 with EPC keyboard,
        kdch1=^?, kel=\E[4~, kend=\E[4~, kf0=\E[21~, kf1=\E[11~,
        kf2=\E[12~, kf3=\E[13~, kf4=\E[14~, kf5=\E[15~, khome=\E[H,
        use=wy520,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 with 24 data lines and status (terminal status)
 #       with EPC keyboard.
-wy520-epc-24|wyse520-pc-24|wyse 520 with 24 data lines and EPC keyboard,
+wy520-epc-24|wyse520-pc-24|Wyse 520 with 24 data lines and EPC keyboard,
        hs@,
        dsl@, fsl@, rs3=\E[?5l\E[47h\E[40l\E[1;24r, tsl@,
        use=wy520-epc,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 with visual bell.
-wy520-epc-vb|wyse520-pc-vb|wyse 520 with visible bell and EPC keyboard,
+wy520-epc-vb|wyse520-pc-vb|Wyse 520 with visible bell and EPC keyboard,
        flash=\E[30h\E\,$<100/>\E[30l, use=wy520-epc,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 132-column mode.
-wy520-epc-w|wyse520-epc-w|wyse 520 in 132-column mode with EPC keyboard,
+wy520-epc-w|wyse520-epc-w|Wyse 520 in 132-column mode with EPC keyboard,
        cols#132, wsl#132,
        dch=\E[%p1%dP$<7>, dch1=\E[P$<7>, ich=\E[%p1%d@$<7>,
        ip=$<7>, rs2=\E[35h\E[?3h, use=wy520-epc,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 132-column mode with visual bell.
-wy520-epc-wvb|wyse520-p-wvb|wyse 520 with visible bell 132-columns and EPC keyboard,
+wy520-epc-wvb|wyse520-p-wvb|Wyse 520 with visible bell 132-columns and EPC keyboard,
        flash=\E[30h\E\,$<100/>\E[30l, use=wy520-epc-w,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 80-column, 36 lines
-wy520-36|wyse520-36|wyse 520 with 36 data lines,
+wy520-36|wyse520-36|Wyse 520 with 36 data lines,
        hs@,
        lines#36,
        dsl@, fsl@, rs3=\E[?5l\E[36*|\E[36t\E[40l\E[1;36r, tsl@,
        use=wy520,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 80-column, 48 lines
-wy520-48|wyse520-48|wyse 520 with 48 data lines,
+wy520-48|wyse520-48|Wyse 520 with 48 data lines,
        hs@,
        lines#48,
        dsl@, fsl@, rs3=\E[?5l\E[48*|\E[48t\E[40l\E[1;48r, tsl@,
        use=wy520,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 132-column, 36 lines
-wy520-36w|wyse520-36w|wyse 520 with 132 columns and 36 data lines,
+wy520-36w|wyse520-36w|Wyse 520 with 132 columns and 36 data lines,
        cols#132, wsl#132,
        rs2=\E[?3h,
        rs3=\E[?5l\E[36*|\E[36t\E[40l\E[1;36r\E[132$|,
        use=wy520-36,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 132-column, 48 lines
-wy520-48w|wyse520-48w|wyse 520 with 48 data lines,
+wy520-48w|wyse520-48w|Wyse 520 with 48 data lines,
        cols#132, wsl#132,
        rs2=\E[?3h,
        rs3=\E[?5l\E[48*|\E[48t\E[40l\E[1;48r\E[132$|,
@@ -13123,28 +13123,28 @@ wy520-48w|wyse520-48w|wyse 520 with 48 data lines,
 #
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 80-column, 36 lines with EPC keyboard
-wy520-36pc|wyse520-36pc|wyse 520 with 36 data lines and EPC keyboard,
+wy520-36pc|wyse520-36pc|Wyse 520 with 36 data lines and EPC keyboard,
        hs@,
        lines#36,
        dsl@, fsl@, rs3=\E[?5l\E[36*|\E[36t\E[40l\E[1;36r, tsl@,
        use=wy520-epc,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 80-column, 48 lines with EPC keyboard
-wy520-48pc|wyse520-48pc|wyse 520 with 48 data lines and EPC keyboard,
+wy520-48pc|wyse520-48pc|Wyse 520 with 48 data lines and EPC keyboard,
        hs@,
        lines#48,
        dsl@, fsl@, rs3=\E[?5l\E[48*|\E[48t\E[40l\E[1;48r, tsl@,
        use=wy520-epc,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 132-column, 36 lines with EPC keyboard
-wy520-36wpc|wyse520-36wpc|wyse 520 with 36 data lines and EPC keyboard,
+wy520-36wpc|wyse520-36wpc|Wyse 520 with 36 data lines and EPC keyboard,
        cols#132, wsl#132,
        rs2=\E[?3h,
        rs3=\E[?5l\E[36*|\E[36t\E[40l\E[1;36r\E[132$|,
        use=wy520-36pc,
 #
 #       Wyse 520 in 132-column, 48 lines with EPC keyboard
-wy520-48wpc|wyse520-48wpc|wyse 520 with 48 data lines and EPC keyboard,
+wy520-48wpc|wyse520-48wpc|Wyse 520 with 48 data lines and EPC keyboard,
        cols#132, wsl#132,
        rs2=\E[?3h,
        rs3=\E[?5l\E[48*|\E[48t\E[40l\E[1;48r\E[132$|,
@@ -13298,7 +13298,7 @@ vt320-k3|MS-Kermit 3.00's vt320 emulation,
 # From: Joseph Gil <yogi@cs.ubc.ca> 13 Dec 1991
 # ACS capabilities from Philippe De Muyter  <phdm@info.ucl.ac.be> 30 May 1996
 # (I removed a bogus boolean :mo: and added <msgr>, <smam>, <rmam> -- esr)
-vt320-k311|dec vt320 series as defined by kermit 3.11,
+vt320-k311|DEC vt320 series as defined by kermit 3.11,
        am, eslok, hs, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, vt#3,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -13465,7 +13465,7 @@ rbcomm-w|IBM PC with RBcomm in 132 column mode,
 # NOTE: calling 'beep' turns on the backlight (bell)
 # NOTE: calling 'flash' turns it on and back off (visual bell)
 #
-MtxOrb|Generic Matrix Orbital LCD display,
+MtxOrb|generic Matrix Orbital LCD display,
        bel=\376B\001, clear=\376X\376C\376R\376K\376T,
        cnorm=\376K\376T, cub1=\376L, cuf1=\376M,
        flash=\376B\001$<200>\376F, home=\376H,
@@ -13759,7 +13759,7 @@ att4418-w|att5418-w|AT&T 5418 132 cols,
        cols#132,
        is1=\E[?3h, use=att5418,
 
-att4420|tty4420|teletype 4420,
+att4420|tty4420|Teletype 4420,
        OTbs, da, db, eo, msgr, ul, xon,
        cols#80, lines#24, lm#72,
        bel=^G, clear=\EH\EJ, cr=\EG, cub1=\ED, cud1=\EB, cuf1=\EC,
@@ -13786,7 +13786,7 @@ att4420|tty4420|teletype 4420,
 # The terminal has either bold or blink, depending on options
 #
 # (att4424: commented out <smcup>=\E[1m, we don't need bright locked on -- esr)
-att4424|tty4424|teletype 4424,
+att4424|tty4424|Teletype 4424,
        OTbs, am, xon,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -13806,7 +13806,7 @@ att4424|tty4424|teletype 4424,
        sgr0=\EX\E~\EZ\E4\E(B, smacs=\E(0, smso=\E}, smul=\E\\,
        tbc=\EF,
 
-att4424-1|tty4424-1|teletype 4424 in display function group I,
+att4424-1|tty4424-1|Teletype 4424 in display function group I,
        kclr@, kcub1=\ED, kcud1=\EB, kcuf1=\EC, kcuu1=\EA, khome@,
        use=att4424,
 
@@ -13816,7 +13816,7 @@ att4424-1|tty4424-1|teletype 4424 in display function group I,
 # The following two lines are the comment originally attached to the entry:
 # This entry appears to avoid the top line - I have no idea why.
 # From: jwb Wed Mar 31 13:25:09 1982 remote from ihuxp
-att4424m|tty4424m|teletype 4424M,
+att4424m|tty4424m|Teletype 4424M,
        am, da, db, mir,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#23,
        bel=^G, clear=\E[2;H\E[J, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=\E[C,
@@ -13876,13 +13876,13 @@ att5425|tty5425|att4425|AT&T 4425/5425,
 att5425-nl|tty5425-nl|att4425-nl|AT&T 4425/5425 80 columns no labels,
        smkx=\E[21;1j\E[25;4j\Eent, use=att4425,
 
-att5425-w|att4425-w|tty5425-w|teletype 4425/5425 in 132 column mode,
+att5425-w|att4425-w|tty5425-w|Teletype 4425/5425 in 132 column mode,
        cols#132, lm#54, wsl#97,
        is1=\E[?3h$<100>, use=tty5425,
 
 # (att4426: his had bogus capabilities: :ri=\EM:, :ri=\E[1U:.
 # I also added <rmam>/<smam> -- esr)
-att4426|tty4426|teletype 4426S,
+att4426|tty4426|Teletype 4426S,
        am, da, db, xon,
        cols#80, lines#24, lm#48,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -14094,7 +14094,7 @@ att5620-1|tty5620-1|dmd1|Teletype 5620 with old ROMs,
 # <msgr> is from an otherwise inferior BRL for this terminal.  That entry
 # also has <ll>=\E[70H commented out and marked unsafe.
 # For more, see the 5620 FAQ maintained by David Breneman <daveb@dgtl.com>.
-att5620|dmd|tty5620|ttydmd|5620|5620 terminal 88 columns,
+att5620|dmd|tty5620|ttydmd|5620|AT&T 5620 terminal 88 columns,
        OTbs, am, msgr, npc, xon,
        cols#88, it#8, lines#70,
        bel=^G, bold=\E[2m, clear=\E[H\E[J, cr=\r, cub1=^H,
@@ -14107,12 +14107,12 @@ att5620|dmd|tty5620|ttydmd|5620|5620 terminal 88 columns,
        pfx=\E[%p1%d;%p2%l%dq%p2%s, rc=\E8, rev=\E[7m, ri=\E[T,
        rmso=\E[0m, rmul=\E[0m, rs1=\Ec, sc=\E7, sgr0=\E[0m,
        smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m, use=ecma+index,
-att5620-24|tty5620-24|dmd-24|teletype dmd 5620 in a 24x80 layer,
+att5620-24|tty5620-24|dmd-24|Teletype dmd 5620 in a 24x80 layer,
        lines#24, use=att5620,
-att5620-34|tty5620-34|dmd-34|teletype dmd 5620 in a 34x80 layer,
+att5620-34|tty5620-34|dmd-34|Teletype dmd 5620 in a 34x80 layer,
        lines#34, use=att5620,
 # 5620 layer running the "S" system's downloaded graphics handler:
-att5620-s|tty5620-s|layer|vitty|5620 S layer,
+att5620-s|tty5620-s|layer|vitty|AT&T 5620 S layer,
        OTbs, OTpt, am,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#72,
        bel=^G, clear=^L, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n,
@@ -14156,7 +14156,7 @@ att605|AT&T 605 80 column 102key keyboard,
        rs2=\Ec\E[?3l, sc=\E7, sgr0=\E[m\017, smacs=\E)0\016,
        smir=\E[4h, smln=\E[p, smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m,
        tsl=\E7\E[25;%i%p1%dx,
-att605-pc|ATT 605 in pc term mode,
+att605-pc|AT&T 605 in pc term mode,
        acsc=j\331k\277l\332m\300n\305q\304t\303u\264v\301w\302x
             \263,
        cbt=\E[Z, cub1=\E[D, cud1=\E[B, cuf1=\E[C, cuu1=\E[A,
@@ -14739,7 +14739,7 @@ tt505-22|pt505-22|gs5430-22|AT&T PT505 or 5430 GETSET version 1 22 lines,
 
 # From: <cbosg!ucbvax!SRC:george> Fri Sep 11 22:38:32 1981
 # (ampex80: some capabilities merged in from SCO's entry -- esr)
-ampex80|a80|d80|dialogue|dialogue80|ampex dialogue 80,
+ampex80|a80|d80|dialogue|dialogue80|Ampex dialogue 80,
        OTbs, am, bw, ul,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        bel=^G, cbt=\EI, clear=\E*$<75>, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n,
@@ -14748,7 +14748,7 @@ ampex80|a80|d80|dialogue|dialogue80|ampex dialogue 80,
        ich1=\EQ, il1=\EE$<5*>, ind=\n, is2=\EA, rmso=\Ek, rmul=\Em,
        smso=\Ej, smul=\El, tbc=\E3,
 # This entry was from somebody anonymous, Tue Aug  9 20:11:37 1983, who wrote:
-ampex175|ampex d175,
+ampex175|Ampex d175,
        am,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=\E+, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -14763,11 +14763,11 @@ ampex175|ampex d175,
 # mode), this key can be used as the erase key; I find I like this. Because
 # some people and some systems may not, there is another termcap ("ampex175")
 # that suppresses this little eccentricity by omitting the relevant capability.
-ampex175-b|ampex d175 using left arrow for erase,
+ampex175-b|Ampex d175 using left arrow for erase,
        kbs=^_, use=ampex175,
 # From: Richard Bascove <atd!dsd!rcb@ucbvax.berkeley.edu>
 # (ampex210: removed obsolete ":kn#10:" -- esr)
-ampex210|a210|ampex a210,
+ampex210|a210|Ampex a210,
        OTbs, am, hs, xenl,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, xmc#1,
        cbt=\EI, clear=\E*, cub1=^H, cuf1=^L,
@@ -14783,7 +14783,7 @@ ampex210|a210|ampex a210,
 # (ampex219: I added <rmam>/<smam> based on the init string, added <cvvis>
 # from ampex219w, added <cnorm>=\E[?3l, irresistibly suggested by <cvvis>,
 # and moved the padding to be *after* the caps -- esr)
-ampex219|ampex-219|amp219|Ampex with Automargins,
+ampex219|ampex-219|amp219|Ampex with automargins,
        hs, xenl,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        bel=^G, blink=\E[5m$<2>, bold=\E[1m$<2>, cbt=\E[Z,
@@ -14948,7 +14948,7 @@ ampex232w|Ampex Model 232 / 132 columns,
 #      unused
 #
 
-annarbor4080|aa4080|ann arbor 4080,
+annarbor4080|aa4080|Ann Arbor 4080,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, lines#40,
        bel=^G, clear=\014$<2>, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^_,
@@ -14974,7 +14974,7 @@ aas1901|Ann Arbor K4080 w/S1901 mod,
 #   3. Number of lines below (outside of) desired scroll region.
 #   4. Total number of lines on the screen, the same as the first parameter.
 # The generic Ann Arbor entry is the only one that uses this.
-aaa+unk|aaa-unk|ann arbor ambassador (internal - don't use this directly),
+aaa+unk|aaa-unk|Ann Arbor Ambassador (internal - don't use this directly),
        OTbs, am, km, mc5i, mir, xon,
        cols#80, it#8,
        bel=^G, blink=\E[5m, bold=\E[1m, cbt=\E[Z,
@@ -15005,7 +15005,7 @@ aaa+unk|aaa-unk|ann arbor ambassador (internal - don't use this directly),
        smm=\E[>52h, smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m, tbc=\E[3g,
        vpa=\E[%p1%{1}%+%dd, use=ansi+rep,
 
-aaa+rv|ann arbor ambassador in reverse video,
+aaa+rv|Ann Arbor Ambassador in reverse video,
        blink=\E[5;7m, bold=\E[1;7m, invis=\E[7;8m,
        is1=\E[7m\E7\E[H\E9\E8, rev=\E[m, rmso=\E[7m, rmul=\E[7m,
        rs1=\E[H\E[7m\E[J$<156>,
@@ -15013,47 +15013,47 @@ aaa+rv|ann arbor ambassador in reverse video,
            ;%;%?%p7%t8;%;m\016,
        sgr0=\E[7m\016, smso=\E[m, smul=\E[4;7m,
 # Ambassador with the DEC option, for partial vt100 compatibility.
-aaa+dec|ann arbor ambassador in dec vt100 mode,
+aaa+dec|Ann Arbor Ambassador in DEC vt100 mode,
        acsc=aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}},
        csr=\E[%i%p1%d;%p2%dr, enacs=\E(B\E)0, rmacs=^O,
        sgr=\E[%?%p2%t4;%;%?%p4%t5;%;%?%p6%t1;%;%?%p1%p3%|%!%t7;%;%?
            %p7%t8;%;m%?%p9%t\016%e\017%;,
        smacs=^N,
-aaa-18|ann arbor ambassador/18 lines,
+aaa-18|Ann Arbor Ambassador/18 lines,
        lines#18,
        is2=\E7\E[60;0;0;18p\E8,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;18p\E[60;1H\E[K, smcup=\E[18;0;0;18p,
        use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-18-rv|ann arbor ambassador/18 lines+reverse video,
+aaa-18-rv|Ann Arbor Ambassador/18 lines+reverse video,
        use=aaa+rv, use=aaa-18,
-aaa-20|ann arbor ambassador/20 lines,
+aaa-20|Ann Arbor Ambassador/20 lines,
        lines#20,
        is2=\E7\E[60;0;0;20p\E8,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;20p\E[60;1H\E[K, smcup=\E[20;0;0;20p,
        use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-22|ann arbor ambassador/22 lines,
+aaa-22|Ann Arbor Ambassador/22 lines,
        lines#22,
        is2=\E7\E[60;0;0;22p\E8,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;22p\E[60;1H\E[K, smcup=\E[22;0;0;22p,
        use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-24|ann arbor ambassador/24 lines,
+aaa-24|Ann Arbor Ambassador/24 lines,
        lines#24,
        is2=\E7\E[60;0;0;24p\E8,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;24p\E[60;1H\E[K, smcup=\E[24;0;0;24p,
        use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-24-rv|ann arbor ambassador/24 lines+reverse video,
+aaa-24-rv|Ann Arbor Ambassador/24 lines+reverse video,
        use=aaa+rv, use=aaa-24,
-aaa-26|ann arbor ambassador/26 lines,
+aaa-26|Ann Arbor Ambassador/26 lines,
        lines#26,
        is2=\E7\E[60;0;0;26p\E8,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;26p\E[26;1H\E[K,
        smcup=\E[H\E[J$<156>\E[26;0;0;26p, use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-28|ann arbor ambassador/28 lines,
+aaa-28|Ann Arbor Ambassador/28 lines,
        lines#28,
        is2=\E7\E[60;0;0;28p\E8,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;28p\E[28;1H\E[K,
        smcup=\E[H\E[J$<156>\E[28;0;0;28p, use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-30-s|aaa-s|ann arbor ambassador/30 lines w/status,
+aaa-30-s|aaa-s|Ann Arbor Ambassador/30 lines w/status,
        eslok, hs,
        lines#29,
        dsl=\E7\E[60;0;0;30p\E[1;1H\E[K\E[H\E8\r\n\E[K,
@@ -15061,76 +15061,76 @@ aaa-30-s|aaa-s|ann arbor ambassador/30 lines w/status,
        rmcup=\E[60;1;0;30p\E[29;1H\E[K,
        smcup=\E[H\E[J$<156>\E[30;1;0;30p\E[30;1H\E[K,
        tsl=\E[>51h\E[1;%p1%dH\E[2K, use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-30-s-rv|aaa-s-rv|ann arbor ambassador/30 lines+status+reverse video,
+aaa-30-s-rv|aaa-s-rv|Ann Arbor Ambassador/30 lines+status+reverse video,
        use=aaa+rv, use=aaa-30-s,
-aaa-s-ctxt|aaa-30-s-ctxt|ann arbor ambassador/30 lines+status+save context,
+aaa-s-ctxt|aaa-30-s-ctxt|Ann Arbor Ambassador/30 lines+status+save context,
        rmcup=\E[60;1;0;30p\E[59;1H\E[K,
        smcup=\E[30;1H\E[K\E[30;1;0;30p, use=aaa-30-s,
-aaa-s-rv-ctxt|aaa-30-s-rv-ct|ann arbor ambassador/30 lines+status+save context+reverse video,
+aaa-s-rv-ctxt|aaa-30-s-rv-ct|Ann Arbor Ambassador/30 lines+status+save context+reverse video,
        rmcup=\E[60;1;0;30p\E[59;1H\E[K,
        smcup=\E[30;1H\E[K\E[30;1;0;30p, use=aaa-30-s-rv,
-aaa|aaa-30|ambas|ambassador|ann arbor ambassador/30 lines,
+aaa|aaa-30|ambas|ambassador|Ann Arbor Ambassador/30 lines,
        lines#30,
        is2=\E7\E[60;0;0;30p\E8,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;30p\E[30;1H\E[K,
        smcup=\E[H\E[J$<156>\E[30;0;0;30p, use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-30-rv|aaa-rv|ann arbor ambassador/30 lines in reverse video,
+aaa-30-rv|aaa-rv|Ann Arbor Ambassador/30 lines in reverse video,
        use=aaa+rv, use=aaa-30,
-aaa-30-ctxt|aaa-ctxt|ann arbor ambassador/30 lines; saving context,
+aaa-30-ctxt|aaa-ctxt|Ann Arbor Ambassador/30 lines; saving context,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;30p\E[60;1H\E[K, smcup=\E[30;0;0;30p,
        use=aaa-30,
-aaa-30-rv-ctxt|aaa-rv-ctxt|ann arbor ambassador/30 lines reverse video; saving context,
+aaa-30-rv-ctxt|aaa-rv-ctxt|Ann Arbor Ambassador/30 lines reverse video; saving context,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;30p\E[60;1H\E[K, smcup=\E[30;0;0;30p,
        use=aaa+rv, use=aaa-30,
-aaa-36|ann arbor ambassador/36 lines,
+aaa-36|Ann Arbor Ambassador/36 lines,
        lines#36,
        is2=\E7\E[60;0;0;36p\E8,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;36p\E[36;1H\E[K,
        smcup=\E[H\E[J$<156>\E[36;0;0;36p, use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-36-rv|ann arbor ambassador/36 lines+reverse video,
+aaa-36-rv|Ann Arbor Ambassador/36 lines+reverse video,
        use=aaa+rv, use=aaa-36,
-aaa-40|ann arbor ambassador/40 lines,
+aaa-40|Ann Arbor Ambassador/40 lines,
        lines#40,
        is2=\E7\E[60;0;0;40p\E8,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;40p\E[40;1H\E[K,
        smcup=\E[H\E[J$<156>\E[40;0;0;40p, use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-40-rv|ann arbor ambassador/40 lines+reverse video,
+aaa-40-rv|Ann Arbor Ambassador/40 lines+reverse video,
        use=aaa+rv, use=aaa-40,
-aaa-48|ann arbor ambassador/48 lines,
+aaa-48|Ann Arbor Ambassador/48 lines,
        lines#48,
        is2=\E7\E[60;0;0;48p\E8,
        rmcup=\E[60;0;0;48p\E[48;1H\E[K,
        smcup=\E[H\E[J$<156>\E[48;0;0;48p, use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-48-rv|ann arbor ambassador/48 lines+reverse video,
+aaa-48-rv|Ann Arbor Ambassador/48 lines+reverse video,
        use=aaa+rv, use=aaa-48,
-aaa-60-s|ann arbor ambassador/59 lines+status,
+aaa-60-s|Ann Arbor Ambassador/59 lines+status,
        eslok, hs,
        lines#59,
        dsl=\E7\E[60;0;0;60p\E[1;1H\E[K\E[H\E8\r\n\E[K,
        fsl=\E[>51l, is2=\r\n\E[A\E7\E[60;1;0;60p\E8,
        tsl=\E[>51h\E[1;%p1%dH\E[2K, use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-60-s-rv|ann arbor ambassador/59 lines+status+reverse video,
+aaa-60-s-rv|Ann Arbor Ambassador/59 lines+status+reverse video,
        use=aaa+rv, use=aaa-60-s,
-aaa-60-dec-rv|ann arbor ambassador/dec mode+59 lines+status+rev video,
+aaa-60-dec-rv|Ann Arbor Ambassador/DEC mode+59 lines+status+rev video,
        use=aaa+dec, use=aaa+rv, use=aaa-60-s,
-aaa-60|ann arbor ambassador/60 lines,
+aaa-60|Ann Arbor Ambassador/60 lines,
        lines#60,
        is2=\E7\E[60;0;0;60p\E[1Q\E[m\E[>20;30l\E8,
        use=aaa+unk,
-aaa-60-rv|ann arbor ambassador/60 lines+reverse video,
+aaa-60-rv|Ann Arbor Ambassador/60 lines+reverse video,
        use=aaa+rv, use=aaa-60,
-aaa-db|ann arbor ambassador 30/destructive backspace,
+aaa-db|Ann Arbor Ambassador 30/destructive backspace,
        OTbs@,
        cub1=\E[D, is3=\E[1Q\E[m\E[>20l\E[>30h, use=aaa-30,
 
-guru|guru-33|guru+unk|ann arbor guru/33 lines 80 cols,
+guru|guru-33|guru+unk|Ann Arbor guru/33 lines 80 cols,
        lines#33,
        flash=\E[>59h$<100>\E[>59l,
        is2=\E7\E[255;0;0;33;80;80p\E8\E[J, is3=\E[>59l,
        rmcup=\E[255p\E[255;1H\E[K, smcup=\E[33p, use=aaa+unk,
 guru+rv|guru changes for reverse video,
        flash=\E[>59l$<100>\E[>59h, is3=\E[>59h,
-guru-rv|guru-33-rv|ann arbor guru/33 lines+reverse video,
+guru-rv|guru-33-rv|Ann Arbor guru/33 lines+reverse video,
        use=guru+rv, use=guru-33,
 guru+s|guru status line,
        eslok, hs,
@@ -15139,19 +15139,19 @@ guru+s|guru status line,
        tsl=\E[>51h\E[1;%p1%dH\E[2K,
 guru-nctxt|guru with no saved context,
        smcup=\E[H\E[J$<156>\E[33p\E[255;1H\E[K, use=guru,
-guru-s|guru-33-s|ann arbor guru/33 lines+status,
+guru-s|guru-33-s|Ann Arbor guru/33 lines+status,
        lines#32,
        is2=\r\n\E[A\E7\E[255;1;0;33;80;80p\E8\E[J,
        smcup=\E[33;1p\E[255;1H\E[K, use=guru+s, use=guru+unk,
-guru-24|ann arbor guru 24 lines,
+guru-24|Ann Arbor guru 24 lines,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        is2=\E7\E[255;0;0;24;80;80p\E8\E[J, smcup=\E[24p,
        use=guru+unk,
-guru-44|ann arbor guru 44 lines,
+guru-44|Ann Arbor guru 44 lines,
        cols#97, lines#44,
        is2=\E7\E[255;0;0;44;97;100p\E8\E[J, smcup=\E[44p,
        use=guru+unk,
-guru-44-s|ann arbor guru/44 lines+status,
+guru-44-s|Ann Arbor guru/44 lines+status,
        lines#43,
        is2=\r\n\E[A\E7\E[255;1;0;44;80;80p\E8\E[J,
        smcup=\E[44;1p\E[255;1H\E[K, use=guru+s, use=guru+unk,
@@ -15159,7 +15159,7 @@ guru-76|guru with 76 lines by 89 cols,
        cols#89, lines#76,
        is2=\E7\E[255;0;0;76;89;100p\E8\E[J, smcup=\E[76p,
        use=guru+unk,
-guru-76-s|ann arbor guru/76 lines+status,
+guru-76-s|Ann Arbor guru/76 lines+status,
        cols#89, lines#75,
        is2=\r\n\E[A\E7\E[255;1;0;76;89;100p\E8\E[J,
        smcup=\E[76;1p\E[255;1H\E[K, use=guru+s, use=guru+unk,
@@ -15171,7 +15171,7 @@ guru-76-w|guru 76 lines by 178 cols,
        cols#178, lines#76,
        is2=\E7\E[255;0;0;76;178;178p\E8\E[J, smcup=\E[76p,
        use=guru+unk,
-guru-76-w-s|ann arbor guru/76 lines+status+wide,
+guru-76-w-s|Ann Arbor guru/76 lines+status+wide,
        cols#178, lines#75,
        is2=\r\n\E[A\E7\E[255;1;0;76;178;178p\E8\E[J,
        smcup=\E[76;1p\E[255;1H\E[K, use=guru+s, use=guru+unk,
@@ -15179,7 +15179,7 @@ guru-76-wm|guru 76 lines by 178 cols with 255 cols memory,
        cols#178, lines#76,
        is2=\E7\E[255;0;0;76;178;255p\E8\E[J, smcup=\E[76p,
        use=guru+unk,
-aaa-rv-unk|ann arbor unknown type,
+aaa-rv-unk|Ann Arbor unknown type,
        lh#0, lw#0, nlab#0,
        blink=\E[5;7m, bold=\E[1;7m, home=\E[H, invis=\E[7;8m,
        is1=\E[7m\E7\E[H\E9\E8, rev=\E[m, rmso=\E[7m, rmul=\E[7m,
@@ -15250,7 +15250,7 @@ regent60|regent200|adds200|Adds Regent 60,
        use=regent40+,
 # From: <edward@onyx.berkeley.edu> Thu Jul  9 09:27:33 1981
 # (viewpoint: added <kcuf1>, function key, and <dl1> capabilities -- esr)
-viewpoint|addsviewpoint|adds viewpoint,
+viewpoint|addsviewpoint|ADDS Viewpoint,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=^L, cnorm=\017\E0`, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n,
@@ -15260,7 +15260,7 @@ viewpoint|addsviewpoint|adds viewpoint,
        kf0=^B1, kf2=^B2, kf3=^B!, kf4=^B", kf5=^B#, khome=^A, ll=^A,
        rmso=^O, rmul=^O, sgr0=^O, smso=^N, smul=^N,
 # Some viewpoints have bad ROMs that foo up on ^O
-screwpoint|adds viewpoint with ^O bug,
+screwpoint|ADDS Viewpoint with ^O bug,
        cvvis@, rmso@, rmul@, smso@, smul@, use=viewpoint,
 
 # From: Jay S. Rouman <jsr@dexter.mi.org> 5 Jul 92
@@ -15318,7 +15318,7 @@ screwpoint|adds viewpoint with ^O bug,
 # Underlined Half Intensity
 #    Blinking                     c    0143
 # Video suppress                  D    0104
-vp3a+|viewpoint3a+|adds viewpoint 3a+,
+vp3a+|viewpoint3a+|ADDS Viewpoint 3a+,
        am, bw,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        blink=\E0B\E), civis=^W, clear=\E*$<80>, cnorm=^X, cr=\r,
@@ -15331,7 +15331,7 @@ vp3a+|viewpoint3a+|adds viewpoint 3a+,
            %?%p2%t%{32}%|%;%?%p3%t%{16}%|%;%?%p4%t%{2}%|%;%?%p5%t
            %{1}%|%;%c%?%p7%tD%;\E)%e\E(%;,
        sgr0=\E(, smso=\E0Q\E), smul=\E0`\E),
-vp60|viewpoint60|addsvp60|adds viewpoint60,
+vp60|viewpoint60|addsvp60|ADDS Viewpoint60,
        use=regent40,
 #
 # adds viewpoint 90 - from cornell
@@ -15344,7 +15344,7 @@ vp60|viewpoint60|addsvp60|adds viewpoint60,
 #   -    <clear=\EG\Ek>: clears screen and visual attributes without affecting
 #               the status line
 # Function key and label capabilities merged in from SCO.
-vp90|viewpoint90|adds viewpoint 90,
+vp90|viewpoint90|ADDS Viewpoint 90,
        OTbs, bw, msgr, xhp,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        clear=\EG\Ek, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^F,
@@ -15359,7 +15359,7 @@ vp90|viewpoint90|adds viewpoint 90,
        sgr0=\ER\E0@\EV, smso=\ER\E0Q\EV, smul=\ER\E0`\EV,
 # Note: if return acts weird on a980, check internal switch #2
 # on the top chip on the CONTROL pc board.
-adds980|a980|adds consul 980,
+adds980|a980|ADDS Consul 980,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=\014$<1>\013@, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n,
@@ -15435,7 +15435,7 @@ cit101e|C. Itoh CIT-101e,
 # on.  I also set up mine for parity (but you may not need it).  Then
 # save the setup with ^S.
 # (cit101e-rv: added empty <rmcup> to suppress a tic warning. --esr)
-cit101e-rv|Citoh CIT-101e (sets reverse video),
+cit101e-rv|C.Itoh CIT-101e (sets reverse video),
        am, eo, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        OTnl=\EM, bel=^G, blink=\E[5m, bold=\E[1m, cbt=\E[Z,
@@ -15502,7 +15502,7 @@ cit500|CIE Terminals CIT-500,
        smkx=\E[?1h\E=, smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m, tbc=\E[3g,
 
 # C. Itoh printers begin here
-citoh|ci8510|8510|c.itoh 8510a,
+citoh|ci8510|8510|C.Itoh 8510a,
        cols#80, it#8,
        bold=\E!, cub1@,
        is2=\E(009\,017\,025\,033\,041\,049\,057\,065\,073.,
@@ -15535,7 +15535,7 @@ citoh-8lpi|citoh in 8 lines per inch mode,
 #### Control Data (cdc)
 #
 
-cdc456|cdc 456 terminal,
+cdc456|CDC 456 terminal,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=^Y^X, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -15632,7 +15632,7 @@ cdc721-esc|Control Data 721,
 # non-conformant (but more featureful) ANSI mode.
 #
 # From: Stephen Peterson <stv@utrecht.ow.nl>, 27 May 1995
-visa50|geveke visa 50 terminal in ansi 80 character mode,
+visa50|Geveke VISA 50 terminal in ANSI 80 character mode,
        bw, mir, msgr,
        cols#80, lines#25,
        acsc=0_aaffggh jjkkllmmnnooqqssttuuvvwwxx, bel=^G,
@@ -15706,11 +15706,11 @@ visa50|geveke visa 50 terminal in ansi 80 character mode,
 #
 # No delays needed on c108 because of ^S/^Q handshaking
 #
-c108|concept108|c108-8p|concept108-8p|concept 108 w/8 pages,
+c108|concept108|c108-8p|concept108-8p|Concept 108 w/8 pages,
        is3=\EU\E\sz"\Ev\001\177\s!p\E\s;"\E\sz\s\Ev\s\s\001\177p
            \Ep\n,
        rmcup=\Ev  \001\177p\Ep\r\n, use=c108-4p,
-c108-4p|concept108-4p|concept 108 w/4 pages,
+c108-4p|concept108-4p|Concept 108 w/4 pages,
        OTbs, eslok, hs, xon,
        pb@,
        acsc=jEkTl\\mMqLxU, cnorm=\Ew, cr=\r,
@@ -15722,13 +15722,13 @@ c108-4p|concept108-4p|concept 108 w/4 pages,
        rmacs=\Ej\s, rmcup=\Ev  \001 p\Ep\r\n, smacs=\Ej!,
        smcup=\EU\Ev  8p\Ep\r\E\025,
        tsl=\E z"\E?\E\005\EE\Ea %+\s, use=c100,
-c108-rv|c108-rv-8p|concept 108 w/8 pages in reverse video,
+c108-rv|c108-rv-8p|Concept 108 w/8 pages in reverse video,
        rmcup=\Ev  \002 p\Ep\r\n, smcup=\EU\Ev  8p\Ep\r,
        use=c108-rv-4p,
-c108-rv-4p|concept108rv4p|concept 108 w/4 pages in reverse video,
+c108-rv-4p|concept108rv4p|Concept 108 w/4 pages in reverse video,
        flash=\EK$<200>\Ek, is1=\Ek, rmso=\Ee, smso=\EE,
        use=c108-4p,
-c108-w|c108-w-8p|concept108-w-8|concept108-w8p|concept 108 w/8 pages in wide mode,
+c108-w|c108-w-8p|concept108-w-8|concept108-w8p|Concept 108 w/8 pages in wide mode,
        cols#132,
        is1=\E F\E", rmcup=\Ev  ^A0\001D\Ep\r\n,
        smcup=\EU\Ev  8\001D\Ep\r, use=c108-8p,
@@ -15771,7 +15771,7 @@ c108-w|c108-w-8p|concept108-w-8|concept108-w8p|concept 108 w/8 pages in wide mod
 # \EQ"\EY(^W (send anything from printer to host, for xon/xoff)
 # cannot be # in is2 because it will hang a c100 with no printer
 # if sent twice.
-c100|concept100|concept|c104|c100-4p|hds concept 100,
+c100|concept100|concept|c104|c100-4p|HDS Concept 100,
        OTbs, am, eo, mir, ul, xenl,
        cols#80, lines#24, pb#9600, vt#8,
        bel=^G, blink=\EC, clear=\E?\E\005$<2*>, cr=$<9>\r,
@@ -15795,10 +15795,10 @@ c100|concept100|concept|c104|c100-4p|hds concept 100,
        rmso=\Ed, rmul=\Eg, sgr0=\EN@,
        smcup=\EU\Ev  8p\Ep\r\E\025$<16>, smir=\E^P, smkx=\EX,
        smso=\ED, smul=\EG,
-c100-rv|c100-rv-4p|concept100-rv|c100 rev video,
+c100-rv|c100-rv-4p|concept100-rv|Concept 100 reverse video,
        cnorm@, cvvis@, flash=\EK$<200>\Ek, is1=\Ek, rmso=\Ee,
        smso=\EE, use=c100,
-oc100|oconcept|c100-1p|old 1 page concept 100,
+oc100|oconcept|c100-1p|old 1-page Concept 100,
        in,
        is3@, use=c100,
 
@@ -16086,7 +16086,7 @@ hds200|Human Designed Systems HDS200,
 
 # <ht> through <el> included to specify padding needed in raw mode.
 # (avt-ns: added empty <acsc> to suppress a tic warning --esr)
-avt-ns|concept avt no status line,
+avt-ns|Concept AVT no status line,
        OTbs, am, eo, mir, ul, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, lm#192,
        acsc=, bel=^G, blink=\E[5m, bold=\E[1m, cbt=\E[Z,
@@ -16117,13 +16117,13 @@ avt-ns|concept avt no status line,
        smcup=\E[=4l\E[1;24w\E2\r, smir=\E[4h,
        smkx=\E[1!z\E[0;3u, smso=\E[7m, smul=\E[4m, tbc=\E[3g,
        vpa=\E[%p1%{1}%+%dd, use=ansi+rep,
-avt-rv-ns|concept avt in reverse video mode/no status line,
+avt-rv-ns|Concept AVT in reverse video mode/no status line,
        flash=\E[=205l$<200>\E[=205h, is1=\E[=103l\E[=205h,
        use=avt-ns,
-avt-w-ns|concept avt in 132 column mode/no status line,
+avt-w-ns|Concept AVT in 132 column mode/no status line,
        is1=\E[=103h\E[=205l, smcup=\E[H\E[1;24;1;132w,
        use=avt-ns,
-avt-w-rv-ns|concept avt in 132 column mode/no status line/reverse video,
+avt-w-rv-ns|Concept AVT in 132 column mode/no status line/reverse video,
        flash=\E[=205l$<200>\E[=205h, is1=\E[=103h\E[=205h,
        smcup=\E[H\E[1;24;1;132w, use=avt-ns,
 
@@ -16135,22 +16135,22 @@ avt-w-rv-ns|concept avt in 132 column mode/no status line/reverse video,
 # on both 4 and 8 page AVTs. (Note the lm#191 or 192 - this
 # assumes an 8 page AVT but lm isn't currently used anywhere.)
 #
-avt+s|concept avt status line changes,
+avt+s|Concept AVT status line changes,
        eslok, hs,
        lm#191,
        dsl=\E[0*w, fsl=\E[1;1!w,
        is3=\E[2w\E[2!w\E[1;1;1;80w\E[H\E[2*w\E[1!w\E2\r\n,
        rmcup=\E[2w\E2\r\n, smcup=\E[2;25w\E2\r,
        tsl=\E[2;1!w\E[;%p1%dH\E[2K,
-avt|avt-s|concept-avt|avt w/80 columns,
+avt|avt-s|concept-avt|Concept AVT w/80 columns,
        use=avt+s, use=avt-ns,
-avt-rv|avt-rv-s|avt reverse video w/sl,
+avt-rv|avt-rv-s|Concept AVT reverse video w/sl,
        flash=\E[=205l$<200>\E[=205h, is1=\E[=103l\E[=205h,
        use=avt+s, use=avt-ns,
-avt-w|avt-w-s|concept avt 132 cols+status,
+avt-w|avt-w-s|Concept AVT 132 cols+status,
        is1=\E[=103h\E[=205l, smcup=\E[H\E[1;24;1;132w,
        use=avt+s, use=avt-ns,
-avt-w-rv|avt-w-rv-s|avt wide+status+rv,
+avt-w-rv|avt-w-rv-s|Concept AVT wide+status+rv,
        flash=\E[=205l$<200>\E[=205h, is1=\E[=103h\E[=205h,
        smcup=\E[H\E[1;24;1;132w, use=avt+s, use=avt-ns,
 
@@ -16372,7 +16372,7 @@ dg+ccc|Configurable color info for DG D430C terminals in DG mode,
 # Initialization string 1 sets:
 #      ^R              - vertical scrolling enabled
 #      ^C              - blinking enabled
-dg-generic|Generic Data General terminal in DG mode,
+dg-generic|generic Data General terminal in DG mode,
        am, bw, msgr, xon,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, blink=^N, clear=^L, cr=\r, cub1=^Y, cud1=^Z, cuf1=^X,
@@ -16385,7 +16385,7 @@ dg-generic|Generic Data General terminal in DG mode,
 # notation that's "^P%r%+\200%+\200").  Those \200s are suspicious,
 # maybe they were originally nuls (which would fit).
 
-dg200|data general dasher 200,
+dg200|Data General DASHER 200,
        OTbs, am, bw,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=^L, cr=\r, cub1=^Y, cud1=^Z, cuf1=^X,
@@ -16414,7 +16414,7 @@ dg211|Data General d211,
        rmso=\036E$<0/>, smcup=^L^R, smso=\036D$<5/>, use=dg200,
 
 # dg450 from Cornell (not official)
-dg450|dg6134|data general 6134,
+dg450|dg6134|Data General 6134,
        cub1@, cuf1=^X, use=dg200,
 
 # Not official...
@@ -16450,7 +16450,7 @@ dg460-ansi|Data General Dasher 460 in ANSI-mode,
 # This also matches a posted description of something called a `Dasher 100'
 # so there's a dg100 alias here.
 # (dg6053: the 4.4BSD file had <cub1=^H>, <cud1=^J>, <cuf1=^S>. -- esr)
-dg6053-old|dg100|data general 6053,
+dg6053-old|dg100|Data General 6053,
        OTbs, am, bw, ul,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        OTbc=^Y, bel=^G, clear=^L, cnorm=^L, cr=\r, cub1=^Y, cud1=^Z,
@@ -16972,7 +16972,7 @@ cs10-w|Datamedia Color Scan 10 with 132 columns,
        cup=\E[%i%p1%02d;%p2%03dH, use=cs10,
 
 # (dm1520: removed obsolete ":ma=^\ ^_^P^YH:" -- esr)
-dm1520|dm1521|datamedia 1520,
+dm1520|dm1521|Datamedia 1520,
        OTbs, am, xenl,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=^L, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^\,
@@ -16981,7 +16981,7 @@ dm1520|dm1521|datamedia 1520,
        khome=^Y,
 # dm2500: this terminal has both <ich> and <smir>. Applications using
 # termcap/terminfo directly (rather than through ncurses) might be confused.
-dm2500|datamedia2500|datamedia 2500,
+dm2500|datamedia2500|Datamedia 2500,
        OTbs, OTnc,
        cols#80, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=^^^^^?, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^\,
@@ -16996,12 +16996,12 @@ dm2500|datamedia2500|datamedia 2500,
 # also, has a meta-key.
 # From: <goldberger@su-csli.arpa>
 # (dmchat: ":MT:" changed to ":km:" -- esr)
-dmchat|dmchat version of datamedia 2500,
+dmchat|dmchat version of Datamedia 2500,
        km,
        dl1=\020\032\030\035$<2/>,
        il1=\020\n\030\035\030\035$<1*/>, use=dm2500,
 # (dm3025: ":MT:" changed to ":km:" -- esr)
-dm3025|datamedia 3025a,
+dm3025|Datamedia 3025a,
        OTbs, km,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=\EM$<2>, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=\EC,
@@ -17010,7 +17010,7 @@ dm3025|datamedia 3025a,
        home=\EH, ht=^I, il1=\EP\n\EQ$<130>, ind=\n, ip=$<6>,
        is2=\EQ\EU\EV, rmdc=\EQ, rmir=\EQ, rmso=\EO0, smdc=\EP,
        smir=\EP, smso=\EO1,
-dm3045|datamedia 3045a,
+dm3045|Datamedia 3045a,
        OTbs, am, eo, km@, ul, xenl,
        dch1=\EB$<6>, dl1@, il1@, is2=\EU\EV, kcuf1=\EC, kcuu1=\EA,
        kf0=\Ey\r, kf1=\Ep\r, kf2=\Eq\r, kf3=\Er\r, kf4=\Es\r,
@@ -17048,7 +17048,7 @@ dm3045|datamedia 3045a,
 #      Aux Bits/Char   0=7    1=8
 #      CRT Saver       0=Off  1=On
 # dm80/1 is a vt100 lookalike, but it doesn't seem to need any padding.
-dm80|dmdt80|dt80|datamedia dt80/1,
+dm80|dmdt80|dt80|Datamedia dt80/1,
        clear=\E[2J\E[H, cud1=\n, cuf1=\E[C,
        cup=%i\E[%p1%d;%p2%dH, cuu1=\E[A, ed=\E[J, el=\E[K,
        home=\E[H, mc0=\E[0i, mc4=\E[4i, mc5=\E[5i, ri=\EM,
@@ -17058,7 +17058,7 @@ dm80|dmdt80|dt80|datamedia dt80/1,
 # This is still less padding than the vt100, and you can always turn on
 # the ^S/^Q handshaking, so you can use vt100 flavors for things like
 # reverse video.
-dm80w|dmdt80w|dt80w|datamedia dt80/1 in 132 char mode,
+dm80w|dmdt80w|dt80w|Datamedia dt80/1 in 132 char mode,
        cols#132,
        clear=\E[H\E[2J$<50/>, cud1=\n,
        cup=\E[%i%p1%d;%p2%dH$<5/>, cuu1=\E[A$<5/>,
@@ -17086,15 +17086,15 @@ dt80-sas|Datamedia DT803/DTX for SAS usage,
 # from the other Datamedias in use here, and yet to associate a model of
 # the Excel terminals with the regular datamedia terminals that share
 # major characteristics.
-excel62|excel64|datamedia Excel 62,
+excel62|excel64|Datamedia Excel 62,
        dch1=\E[P, kbs=^H, kcub1=^H, kcud1=\n, kf5=\EOu, kf6=\EOv,
        kf7=\EOw, kf8=\EOx, kf9=\EOy, rmir=\E[4l, smir=\E[4h,
        use=dt80,
-excel62-w|excel64-w|datamedia Excel 62 in 132 char mode,
+excel62-w|excel64-w|Datamedia Excel 62 in 132 char mode,
        dch1=\E[P, kbs=^H, kcub1=^H, kcud1=\n, kf5=\EOu, kf6=\EOv,
        kf7=\EOw, kf8=\EOx, kf9=\EOy, rmir=\E[4l, smir=\E[4h,
        use=dt80w,
-excel62-rv|excel64-rv|datamedia Excel 62 in reverse video mode,
+excel62-rv|excel64-rv|Datamedia Excel 62 in reverse video mode,
        dch1=\E[P, flash=\E[?5l\E[?5h, kbs=^H, kcub1=^H, kcud1=\n,
        kf5=\EOu, kf6=\EOv, kf7=\EOw, kf8=\EOx, kf9=\EOy, rmir=\E[4l,
        smir=\E[4h, use=dt80,
@@ -17109,13 +17109,13 @@ excel62-rv|excel64-rv|datamedia Excel 62 in reverse video mode,
 #      Net: techsup@charm.sys.falco.com
 #
 # Current Falco models as of 1995 are generally ANSI-compatible and support
-# emulations of DEC VT-series, Wyse, and Televideo types.
+# emulations of DEC VT-series, Wyse, and TeleVideo types.
 #
 
 # Test version for Falco ts-1. See <arpavax.hickman@ucb> for info
 # This terminal was released around 1983 and was discontinued long ago.
 # The standout and underline highlights are the same.
-falco|ts1|ts-1|falco ts-1,
+falco|ts1|ts-1|Falco ts-1,
        OTbs, am,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        bel=^G, clear=\E*, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\n, cuf1=^L,
@@ -17124,7 +17124,7 @@ falco|ts1|ts-1|falco ts-1,
        ind=\n, is2=\Eu\E3, kcub1=^H, kcud1=\n, kcuf1=^L, kcuu1=^K,
        kf0=^A0\r, rmir=\Er, rmso=\Eg0, rmul=\Eg0, sgr0=\Eg0,
        smir=\Eq, smso=\Eg1, smul=\Eg1,
-falco-p|ts1p|ts-1p|falco ts-1 with paging option,
+falco-p|ts1p|ts-1p|Falco ts-1 with paging option,
        OTbs, am, da, db, mir, msgr, ul,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24,
        bel=^G, cbt=\EI, clear=\E*, cr=\r, cub1=^H, cud1=\E[B,
@@ -17135,7 +17135,7 @@ falco-p|ts1p|ts-1p|falco ts-1 with paging option,
        rmso=\Eg0, rmul=\Eg0, sgr0=\Eg0, smcup=\E_d, smir=\Eq,
        smso=\Eg4, smul=\Eg1,
 # (ts100: I added <rmam>/<smam> based on the init string -- esr)
-ts100|ts100-sp|falco ts100-sp,
+ts100|ts100-sp|Falco ts100-sp,
        am, mir, msgr, xenl, xon,
        cols#80, it#8, lines#24, vt#3,
        acsc=``aaffggjjkkllmmnnooppqqrrssttuuvvwwxxyyzz{{||}}~~,
@@ -17156,7 +17156,7 @@ ts100|ts100-sp|falco ts100-sp,
        sgr0=\E[m\017$<2>, smacs=^N, smam=\E[?7h, smkx=\E[?1h\E=,
        smso=\E[1;7m$<2>, smul=\E[4m$<2>, tbc=\E[3g,
        use=vt100+fnkeys,
-ts100-ctxt|falco ts-100 saving context,
+ts100-ctxt|